Windy October night leaves 3,000 without power around Capitol Hill

B01-Se4IcAAjBVjAn October windstorm knocked out power to around 3,000 customers in a northern swath of Capitol Hill near Volunteer Park Saturday night.

The outages were part of a series of service disruptions around the city leaving more than 20,000 without power.

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The largest outage surrounding the park was reportedly caused by a downed branch or tree. A smaller outage knocking about 600 out had a reported restoration time of after 11 PM. City Light estimated a midnight or later restoration for the larger outage.

The outages followed an increase in the night’s gusts around 8 PM. Winds on the 520 bridge measured above 60 MPH.

Around 8:04 PM, wires were reported down on 20th Ave E.

You can view City Light’s status page here.

The National Weather Service says winds could continue through 2 AM:1920393_801976873196054_3007751333398633932_n

CHS Crow | Mattilda, hb and Finley — ‘Finding some other kind of truth’ at Lit Crawl Seattle

It was a Lit Crawl Thursday night! The CHS Crow joined the happy chaos of the most action-packed literary event of the year in Seattle and met a Lamda Literary Award winning author and activist during the after party at Hugo House, a project manager with with memories of bygone burritos at the “Kundiman Poets” reading at Vermillion and a high-school maker of music that’s “just new” exiting the “Weed All About It” reading at Century Ballroom. Here is what they said:

  Mattilda

Who are you?2014.10, Mattlida, CHS Crow portrait - by Jacob Olson
I’m a writer. My most recent book is called The End of San Francisco. It’s a memoir against memoir.

I’ve been here in Seattle like two-and-half years. I live on Capitol Hill.

What else would you like to know?

What is your philosophy of writing?
I write in order to stay alive, basically. It’s the thing I’ve always had access to in order to process my life — make sense of it. And also to express the world that I see that most people don’t seem to. Continue reading

Mayor Nickels: Time for ‘common sense’ steps on gun control

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The former mayor is all in on I-594. Here’s his current Facebook profile photo

Former Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels posted the essay below via Facebook earlier this week before Friday’s tragic school shooting in Marysville. In it, he invoked the memory of the “Capitol Hill massacre” in a call for the State of Washington to do much, much more to control guns:

On the morning of March 25 a few years ago, I stood outside of a house in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood just a block from the newspaper route I had as a kid. A gunman had just taken the lives of six innocent young men and women and then killed himself.
It was a senseless and shocking act of violence in the heart of my community. Like the others who gathered at the scene that morning, I felt grief, disbelief and anger. As mayor of the state’s largest city, I asked myself a question: “what could we have done to prevent this tragedy?”

Every week seems to bring fresh examples that beg this difficult question, from the horrific school shootings to a young man senselessly shot dead during an argument at a Rainer Valley intersection.

The rest of his essay and call for improving the state’s gun control is below.

We asked the former mayor — who grew up on Capitol Hill — if he was worried that calls for greater control as the state prepares to vote on I-594 could lead to greater backlash from the pro-gun community and groups aligning to defeat I-594 and support the limits proposed in I-591.

“The Washington State Legislature has failed to take any meaningful action to protect our children and seniors from guns getting into the hands of felons and persons who are mentally disturbed,” Nickels writes. “Sadly this has largely been due to the opposition of the Democratic Speaker of the House, Frank Chopp.” Continue reading

CHS Pics | This week in Capitol Hill pictures

The CHS Flickr Pool contains more than 18,000 19,000 20,000 21,000  22,000 23,000 photographs -— most of Capitol Hill images, many glorious, some technically amazing. The pool is a mix of contributions from Capitol Hill — and nearby — shutterbugs. Interested in being part of it? If we like your photo and it helps us tell the story, we may feature it on CHS so please include your name and/or a link to your website so we can properly credit you. Interested in working as a paid CHS contributor for scheduled assignments? Drop us a line –- our roster is full for general assignments but pitch us on an idea.

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CHS Pics | A Capitol Hill fall tradition, Weavers’ Guild sale at St. Mark’s

Annette Mentzer and friend spin hand-carded wool (Images: CHS)

Annette Mentzer and friend spin hand-carded wool (Images: CHS)

A longtime part of fall of Capitol Hill, the Seattle Weaver’s Guild has returned to St. Mark’s this weekend for its annual sale that is equal parts opportunity to get your holiday shopping done early and opportunity to learn.

“You can learn a lot from a book but its nothing like being mentored by a wise woman,” weaver Marilyn Romatka told CHS. Creating pieces of woven art since 2007, Romatka worked Thursday on broken twill with tencel on a tabletop loom.

Kris Leet has been weaving since 1971. Her patterns go back even further with the oldest textile bands made in her medieval style dating back to 600-800 BC.

Judith Noble is also a guild longtimer. She says monthly study groups help guild members learn new techniques and improve their work. It also seems like a good way to make a few crafty friends. Continue reading

Church sues to shut down marijuana shop at 23rd/Union, change way Seattle zones pot

Pastor Witherspoon assists Mt Zion's Reverend Samuel B. McKinney with the bullhorn at a rally against Uncle Ike's in October (Image: CHS)

Pastor Witherspoon assists Mt Zion’s Reverend Samuel B. McKinney with the bullhorn at a rally against Uncle Ike’s in October (Image: CHS)

Opening weekend at Uncle Ike's (Image: CHS)

Opening weekend at Uncle Ike’s (Image: CHS)

The Central District church that turned to prayer and protest when it suddenly found itself neighboring Seattle’s second I-502 marijuana retailer is taking its case to close Uncle Ike’s to an even higher power — King County Superior Court.

The Seattle Times reports that Mount Calvary Christian Center is suing to shut Uncle Ike’s down:

The suit alleges that Uncle Ike’s was allowed to open despite being about 250 feet from a teen recreation center. It says the city and state did not perform due diligence in allowing Uncle Ike’s to open.

The church and community center ask the court to revoke Uncle Ike’s license and direct the city of Seattle to set up measures that would require it to let communities weigh in before potential marijuana stores are approved.

The Times reports Mount Calvary’s Pastor Reggie Witherspoon told the paper that Uncle Ike’s owner Ian Eisenberg needs to take the “community’s concerns” more seriously.

Ike’s, the WSLCB and the City of Seattle are all reportedly named in the lawsuit which has not yet been filed. Continue reading

A look at the Capitol Hill numbers from the first week of Seattle’s bike share

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Source: Pronto/Image: CHS

Some 500 rides per day were taken on Seattle’s new Pronto bike share with about 42% of those traveling around Capitol Hill in the system’s first week of operations, the nonprofit’s director Holly Houser tells CHS. CHS got a look at the data and found out where around Capitol Hill people rode the most in Week 1. We also took a tour of our own to visit each of the dozen new Pronto stations around Capitol Hill and First Hill.

One Capitol Hill station ranked among the top five busiest in the first week. Here are the city’s top 5 busiest Pronto stations: 3rd & Pike, Harrison & Broadway, Pier 69, REI Flagship Store, Occidental Park. The second most popular Hill station at 11th and Pine near Cal Anderson Park came in 6th. Continue reading

Blotter | ‘Persons of interest’ caught on camera in $2k Capitol Hill apartment burglary

The "persons of interest" in an October 16th daytime apartment burglary on 19th Ave E (Image: Q13Fox.com)

The “persons of interest” in an October 16th daytime apartment burglary on 19th Ave E (Image: Q13Fox.com)

See something others should know about? Email CHS or call/txt (206) 399-5959. You can view recent CHS Crime coverage here.

  • 19th/Mercer burglary: Thieves made off with nearly $2,000 in stolen goods in a burglary of an apartment inside the 19th and Mercer building last Thursday. The SPD report on the daytime break-in is below. A local TV station posted this picture of the alleged burglars caught by a security camera.Screen Shot 2014-10-23 at 2.38.03 PM Continue reading

In Capitol Hill tech M&A, Redfin closes deal for 12th Ave’s Walk Score

Team Walk Score in front of a familiar Capitol Hill landmark (Image: Walk Score)

Team Walk Score in front of a familiar Capitol Hill landmark (Image: Walk Score)

Employees may not buy flashy new cars in celebration but there are probably going to be at least a few pairs of fancy new shoes on display around 12th Ave this week after Capitol Hill-headquartered start-up Walk Score’s big deal with Seattle-based online real estate company Redfin:

The real estate brokerage today is announcing the acquisition of Walk Score, a 10-person Seattle company that ranks millions of addresses across the country based on their walkability, bikeability or proximity to public transportation. It does this on a scale of 1 to 100 by measuring the distance from a specific addresses to certain neighborhood amenities, such as schools, restaurants, libraries and coffee shops.

Walk Score creates technology to measure walkability, bikeability and proximity to public transportation. You can check out your address’s score here. In 2012, the company secured a $2 million first round of financing.

The tie-up, Mobilisafe CEO Giri Sreenivas points out, marks the second recent successful “exit” for tenants of the Hunters Capital-owned Ballou Wright building on 12th Ave:

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Death and density: 40,000 and counting make Lake View their eternal Capitol Hill home

"Cemetery crows" (Image: Kate Clark via Flickr)

“Cemetery crows” (Image: Kate Clark via Flickr)

Mother Damnable turned to stone before she came to Capitol Hill. Mary Ann Conklin, who ran one of the city’s first hotels, and likely one of its first brothels, earned the name Mother Damnable for her foul mouth and the name Madame Damnable for her side job.

She’d been buried in what was a city cemetery and is now Denny Park after her death in 1873. By 1884, Seattle leaders had decided to turn the cemetery into a park, and relocated the bodies, including Conklin’s. When her remains were moved, the legend at the time said it took six men to lift the casket. In doing so, the lid popped open, and it appeared as if she had been perfectly preserved and turned to stone.

Conklin has one of the more colorful stories surrounding those buried at Capitol Hill’s Lake View Cemetery, but it is far from the only one. Continue reading

Garfield High protesting teacher cut in district budget process

Screen Shot 2014-10-23 at 8.45.22 AMAn annual Seattle Public Schools budgeting process that inexplicably plays out mid-school year is meeting a more heated reception than normal this fall as the district exercises what interim superintendent Larry Nyland calls increased “resource stewardship.”

Thursday afternoon, students, faculty and staff are planning a walkout to protest the planned cut of a teacher at Garfield High School, the only public high school serving Seattle’s central neighborhoods:

The timing of the walkout, 1:50 pm, symbolizes the impact of cutting one core teacher at this late date. Core classes fill to a capacity of 30 students total 150 students per full time teacher. This means that 150 students will have holes in their schedules during the day–roughly 10% of the student body.

The protest is calling for the district to reverse its decision to cut the Garfield teacher.

For SPS, the annual adjustments — even as they come after the school year has already started — are typical business: Continue reading

On the List | Seattle Lit Crawl, Hilloween carnival, 15th Ave E costume crawl, Weavers’ Guild sale

(Image: CHS)

(Image: CHS)

A week of Capitol Hilloween celebrations begins this weekend with a furry flurry of costumed good times for trick or treaters of all types.

Before you put that costume on, however, plan to make a stop or three at the third annual Seattle Lit Crawl. The Lit Crawl will bring some 64 writers and artists out for 21 readings at venues across First Hill and Capitol Hill, along with a over a dozen more folks acting as hosts. The full schedule is here.

Also Thursday, you can do your civic duty by attending the monthly EastPAC community crime meeting at Seattle U.

The centerpiece on an only kinda drizzly Saturday will be the return of the annual Hilloween carnival in Cal Anderson:

Hilloween, Capitol Hill’s favorite kid-friendly Halloween event returns Saturday, October 25thand it’s sure to delight kids of all ages. From 12:00pm to 3:30pm mini-firefighters, tiny princesses, and itty-bitty zombies alike will be tricked and treated to music, candy, prizes and plenty of fun age-appropriate activities. The carnival begins at Cal Anderson Park on Capitol Hill (1635 11th Ave) and include musical performances by The Not-its! and Eli Rosenblatt. Families will enjoy carnival games, a magic show, jugglers, balloon twisters, face painters, stiltwalkers, a couple bouncy houses and Fonzie the Performing Dog all underneath a big top tent. At 3:30 the Chaotic Noise Marching Band will once again lead a costume parade around the park and onto Broadway for trick-or-treating with participating merchants. And to top the day off, kids in costume can get a free slice of pizza at Pagliacci’s. For more information and event schedule visit www.caphilloween.com.

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During Hilloween, make sure to stop by Umpqua Broadway for a “haunted bank laboratory.” And trick or treating.

More grown-up Halloween fun follows Saturday night with a costume pub crawl on 15th Ave E.

Also Saturday, E Madison’s Bottleneck Lounge celebrates its annual Teeny Tiny Pumpkin Brew Festival when all of its taps are dedicated to to pumpkin brew — and, this year, even a pumpkin cider.

More Halloween fun? 19th Ave E’s Cone & Steiner hosts a Sunday pumpkin carving party.

Continue reading

Tougo Coffee owner ready to open charcuterie and wine spot Bannister next door at 18th and Union

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(Image: Bannister)

(Image: Bannister)

The Central District’s one-block commercial stretch along 18th Ave at E Union is one of the quaintest and most neighborhood-y around. Since 2007, Tougo Coffee has anchored the stretch as a neighborhood hangout. Now owner Brian Wells says he’s hoping to cultivate the same sense of community one door down at Bannister, his new charcuterie-wine venture.

Wells tells CHS he’ll hold a reservation-only soft open starting October 24th and a grand opening on November 1st.

On the menu, Wells said to expect fine cheese, cured meats, olives, made-in-house,  pickles, and a full wine bar.

The restaurant is named after Edward Mitchell Bannister, a 19th century artist Wells said he has long admired.

Wells started his coffee career in Boston in 1991. He moved to Seattle in 1996 and spent most of his time in the service industry. In 2010 CHS reported on financial and tax troubles at Tougo. The 18th Ave cafe closed temporarily while Wells fundraised to pay back business taxes in order to renew his license. Since, Wells shuttered his Westlake Ave location. Wells said these days everything is going swell at Tougo and he’s ready for the expanded business venture. Continue reading