Pikes/Pines | The five creepiest crawlies you’ve never heard of that live with you on Capitol Hill

From: The Habitats Humans Provide: Factors affecting the diversity and composition of arthropods in houses

Have you ever been home alone, watching Stranger Things or listening to My Favorite Murder, and started jumping at the sudden hum of the refrigerator, brandishing your ice-cream spoon down the dark hallway to the bathroom? I have good news for you. We are never, ever alone in our homes. We all have other creatures living in our homes, no matter how scrubbed, swept, and sterilized our apartments and houses on the Hill may appear.

From the time that people began living inside dwellings, we’ve had other creatures alongside us. Some are imperceptible, bacteria, viruses, archaea, and fungi. Others, like insects and arachnids, are decidedly more noticeable. In 2016, a press worthy study by North Carolina State University researchers was published, reporting findings from an exhaustive, purportedly first-ever survey of the arthropods (invertebrates of the phylum that includes spiders, insects, and crustaceans) in our homes. Of the 50 houses the authors surveyed in the Raleigh, North Carolina, 100% had arthropods living in them. In fact, they had far more than anyone guessed, and they collected over 10,000 individual specimens representing nearly 600 species of arthropods, with homes hosting an average of 93 species, from 62 families.

Though I doubt this revelation eases your movie induced paranoia, below are five common house guests that you may or may not have even heard of, but may have been living inches from all your life.

Psocoptera (Image: Wikipedia)

1) Booklice (Order Psocoptera) — Unlike their blood sucking cousins, booklice like to chew rather than suck. Mostly they like to munch on fungus, food bits, and other detritus but they will also happily chew on the glue of our book bindings and wall paper and can in some instances infest food. Seeing a few of these opaque flattened creatures is nothing to be alarmed about, but if you happen to collect old books in damp places, be mindful.  People often confuse book lice with bed bug nymphs or termites which are far more alarming.  Continue reading

Spacecraft launching a space for ‘people who don’t necessarily consider themselves artists’ to create art above Broadway

A recent Spacecraft work party (Image: Spacecraft)

One of Capitol Hill’s oldest homes for creative retail spaces and restaurants is making space for a crafty new addition.

Spacecraft, a community arts and craft space targeting “screen addicted adults” and “people who don’t necessarily consider themselves artists,” is getting its final coats of paint and collecting supplies for a planned October opening in the 101-year-old Broadway Alley building.

“I’ve always been crafty, always kind of a dabbler,” Alison Cantor tells CHS. Describing how challenging it is to find space to do those things with “people living in smaller and smaller spaces,” Cantor says Spacecraft will be a place to spread your project out and work on your art somewhere better than the kitchen table.

“It’s a community where people can come and make art,” she said. Continue reading

Hilloween is alive! Broadway BIA picks up 2019 edition of costume, candy, and carnival event

The Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce may be dead but Capitol Hill’s celebration of little ghosts and goblins will live on.

The Broadway Business Improvement Area has announced it will host this year’s Hilloween, an annual, all-ages costume and candy carnival on Broadway. Continue reading

The Baltic Room’s new owners say taking shooting response ‘very seriously’

(Image: The Baltic Room)

Charges haven’t yet been filed against the shooter but the club’s new owners say they are taking action after last weekend’s early morning shooting outside Capitol Hill nightclub The Baltic Room.

“We are taking this matter very seriously and strive to provide an enjoyable experience while maintaining safety of all patrons, employees, and neighbors,” Rachel Keith told CHS in a statement about last Saturday’s 2 AM shooting that sent two to the hospital. Keith said the club has hired “a few more security guards,” and implemented an earlier last call time.

Keith tells CHS the Baltic was clearing out for the night “when a fight between a few people began in the middle of the street up past Woody’s.” Continue reading

The government says (Capitol Hill’s) rainbow crosswalks (spreading to Iowa) could be unsafe. Are they really? (No. No they are not.)

The New York Times got the media buzzing about something that has been making the rounds since last month when the federal government told the good people of Ames, Iowa to remove the city’s “inclusive” multi-colored crosswalks citing safety concerns.

The Ames City Council voted unanimously to ignore the request, the NYT reports. Continue reading

At public safety candidates forum, Orion makes call to ‘stabilize’ force, Sawant makes statement by passing on Seattle Police Officer Guild event

(Image: @brandikruse)

In mid-May, just six weeks after announcing his bid for the Seattle City Council, Egan Orion moderated a panel on summer safety for the now-defunct Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce. A big topic of discussion that day was the understaffing of the Seattle Police Department.

SPD East Precinct commander Capt. Bryan Grenon noted at the meeting that the department was down several officers on all watches and that in his 28 years on the force, they’ve never had officers to spare.

So Orion came into Wednesday’s candidate forum hosted by the Seattle Police Officers Guild to prove his mettle on one of the biggest issues plaguing the city and the district. And what was the first issue he brought up in his opening statement?

“We’re losing police officers faster than we can hire them on the SPD,” Orion said. “Public safety is an essential part of our every day lives, of course.”

Kshama Sawant, Orion’s competitor and the most vocal Seattle Police critic on the current council, chose to make her statement by not attending Wednesday’s forum that included at least one candidate from all seven council seats up for election next month.

“Far too often, the conversation on police accountability has had to start at the grassroots level in the wake of tragic events, with the political establishment rushing to catch up, and the SPOG standing in opposition,” Sawant said in a statement. “I stand with the Movement for Black Lives, which has called for independently elected community oversight boards with full powers over police departments.” Continue reading

Lawsuit settlement won’t end effort to save the Showbox

(Image: The Showbox)

Seattle is conceding on an important legal battle in the campaign to save the city’s Showbox music venue championed by Mayor Jenny Durkan, campaigned for by District 3 rep Kshama Sawant, and fought for by groups like Historic Seattle.

In the deal announced this week by the Seattle City Attorney, the city will pay the Showbox property’s owner Roger Forbes $915,000 to cover attorney fees and both sides agreed to move forward with a King County Superior Court Judge issuing his final ruling after quashing the city council’s temporary expansion of the Pike Place Historic District to protect the building and stop a planned sale.  Continue reading

On the List | Homeless pets pop-up, Seattle Queer Film Festival, freestyle frisbee world championships, Capitol Hill Art Walk at (tiny!) new gallery Elbo Room

A pop-up dedicated to pets and people experiencing homelessness visits Cal Anderson Thursday (Image: Center for One Health Research)

October is not just a good month for creepiness and rain, it’s also an ideal time to wrap yourself in some softer varieties of music, including choral music during the Seattle Sings Choral Festival, running October 10 through 12, and acoustic music during the 6th annual Seattle Acoustic Festival this Saturday. Find more for acoustic aficionados, frisbee fans, and burger buffs below. And don’t forget — the weekend brings the first of three this fall without light rail service between Capitol Hill and SoDo.

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 9: No, your timing’s not off, it’s just Lit Crawl arriving early this year. The festival doesn’t start until later this month, but this week, the literary Capitol Hill event launches early with a kickoff and fundraising party slash open mic. The event will have music, food, and drinks and feature readings by some of Seattle’s “beloved literati,” Richard Chiem, Ching-In Chen, and Ari Rosenschein.

“The evening will also have plenty of opportunities to support Lit Crawl’s artists and ensure we can keep Seattle’s booziest literary night going for as long as it can,” organizers write. “Come prepared to give.” Capitol Cider, 6 PM – 8 PM 

Through Oct. 14: Some would say the burgers of Li’l Woody’s are perhaps already fast food, but this month, the local burger purveyor celebrates Fast Food Month by recreating one fast food classic every week, inspired by Wendy’s, Taco Bell, McDonald’s and co. Don’t miss this weekend’s Sourdough Woody, a Jack in the Box-inspired burger with Hill’s bacon, garlic mayo, grass-fed beef, Swiss cheese, and ketchup. It comes with curly fries. Li’l Woodys Continue reading