Trove is closing — How many concepts will it take to fill its ‘Capitol Hill complex’ space?

The peak of the Capitol Hill food and drink economy boom created a few opportunities so large, they could not be contained in a single concept. Now some four and five years after the debuts of these Capitol Hill complexes, we will get more of an idea of what comes next to the ambitiously large spaces.

Trove, which husband and wife chef team Rachel Yang and Seif Chirchi debuted as a restaurant and bar fourplex — “bustling noodle bar, tucked-in-the-middle bar, new-era Korean BBQ with grill-at-your-table tradition, and a frozen custard walk-up doling out giant parfaits” — in the overhauled 500 E Pike Greenus Building in the sunny September of 2014, will close later this month.

“Today, with a heavy heart, we would like to let you guys know that Trove will have its last dinner service on Sunday, June 30th,” Yang wrote, announcing the plans to close the project in a message to friends and family.  Continue reading

An ‘extraordinarily severe’ emergency: the radioactive leak at Harborview

A small platform crane hoists two men up near the roof gutter of a flat, one-floor building on the Harborview campus on First Hill. Slowly, one of the men moves a thick, round bar roughly six inches along the gutter with his right hand, stops, and then looks at the radiation survey meter in his left. Then he moves the bar another six inches. And another.

If there is any radiation left from the leak of radioactive material that left 13 people exposed during the decommissioning of an irradiator device in the middle of Seattle on May 2nd, these men will find it and wipe it down.

The concrete L-shaped loading dock and parking lot, wedged between the UW Medicine Harborview Medical Center Research and Training Building and a small administrative building near Terry Ave and Terrace, is already polka-dotted with white paint marks, designating areas where potential traces of Cesium-137 were found.

While being checked for radioactive residue, the R&T building is still on lockdown. State Patrol troopers guard the fenced-off entrances to make sure no one can go in and out. From behind the chain-link, there is not much to see — no Chernobyl-like scenes here — except for a sidewalk-wide stripe of white paint near the loading dock doors and a white plastic box covering the ventilation system. The parking lot exudes a ghostly calm.

Here, the night of May 2nd, crews from the Seattle Fire Department rushed to the scene to try to make sense of a rare incident that involved more than 50 people from at least six different agencies, including the department’s HAZMAT team, the Washington State Department of Health, the FBI, University of Washington, and a clean up crew with over 40 officials from the US Department of Energy.

More than six weeks after the leak, little is publicly known about what happened that night — and what went wrong.

Records obtained by CHS, reports by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as well as interviews with officials from the University of Washington, Washington State Department of Health and the US Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration shed more light on the night of the leak, and the aftermath.

The plan for that night, with preparations launched early this year, had been months in the making.

Continue reading

This District 3 candidate just won big-time Seattle labor support

(Image: MLK Labor)

One District 3 candidate just won big-time Seattle business support. And these candidates — all of them — just failed to get the backing of the influential 43rd District Democrats. Now this D3 candidate just struck a major blow in the fight thanks to support from the county’s labor council.

MLK Labor announced Wednesday night it has given its support in the D3 primary to school board member Zachary DeWolf. Continue reading

More hate vandalism on Capitol Hill: City says AIDS Memorial Pathway installations torn down

“When thinking about a temporary art, I thought about the condom, and how, at the start of the AIDs crisis, it became this necessary evil. This thing that people had to utilize and it was a constant reminder of death, of infection, it was a killjoy in a lot of ways. I wanted to take that thing, which was a symbol of fear, and turn it into something of beauty. Now that we’re sort of past that hump and we can look back with more appreciation of the struggle everyone went through and feelings people had. I used about 1000 condoms between the four pieces.” — Pete Rush – AMP Broadway

Artwork installed for Pride around the Capitol Hill Station mixed-use development construction site was ripped down almost as quickly as it went up over the weekend. The city’s Office of Arts and Culture said it is working on getting the works replaced.

Work by artists including Gabriel Stromberg, Pete Rush, and Timothy White Eagle were ripped down in the vandalism. The installations are part of the project creating the AIDS Memorial Pathway, a walkway featuring artwork and tributes that will connect the mixed-use buildings to nearby Cal Anderson Park when it opens in 2020. Continue reading

On the List | Before Stonewall film, Ginsberg poetry festival at Volunteer Park, Seattle Poetry Slam

Before Stonewall (Courtesy of First Run Features)

The epitome of this neighborhood in the year 2019? Perhaps this particular fork in the road: Do you choose meditation with cats, or rather an open mic for works-in-progress at an arts/event space in another building now for sale on the Hill?

Other options on Wednesday include celebrating Juneteenth in the Central District during the last day of “We Out Here,” a festival celebrating Black brilliance.

More things to do this week include  Queers fired up against the far right and a committee meeting (hosted by council member Lorena González) Addressing Gun Violence in the Central District, and free performances by students from the School of Spectrum Dance and Clyde Petersen on the site the future AIDS Memorial Pathway near Cal Anderson this Friday and Saturday.

Find more events the list below, plus on the CHS Pride Calendar and CHS Calendar.

THURSDAY, June 20: Dr. Louise Aronson believes we have some misconceptions around what it means to be or grow old. So the geriatric doctor wrote a book, “Elderhood—Redefining Aging,” to open up the discussion and share an “honest and respectful vision of our society’s elders as still-breathing human beings full of joy, wonder, frustration, outrage, and hope.” At the newly reopened Town Hall, she’ll pull from her experiences to rethink what “old age” means — and how that impacts the way we approach elder health care. Town Hall Seattle, 7.30 PM  

Continue reading

This District 3 candidate just won big-time Seattle business support

Orion at his campaign announcement this spring on Broadway

Calling it a “huge” moment in his campaign that will “shape the race going forward,” District 3 candidate Egan Orion has won the endorsement — and the financial backing powered by Vulcan, Amazon, and Expedia — of CASE, the political arm of the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce.

“They like a lot of Seattle voters are looking for pragmatic folks to get on the council,” Orion said. “Somebody who can work with all sorts of different groups.”

The pro-business and anti-street disorder CASE — the Civic Alliance for a Sound Economy — announced its 2019 primary endorsements Wednesday morning.

Orion said he will not take campaign contributions from business PACs — but the group is likely to be a big spender on his behalf.

Tuesday night, Orion came in dead last in a vote to win the key endorsement of the 43rd District Democrats on a night when none of the challengers rose to the occasion despite a polarizing incumbent in Kshama Sawant.

Orion said CASE’s choice positions him as the best candidate to face off with Sawant. “She’s framed her campaign as her a binary choice between workers and big business,” he said. “I see things in a much more complex way.”

CASE says it endorses candidates who “demonstrate a strong commitment to improving the quality of life and economic opportunities for all Seattleites” on four core issues: Continue reading

No endorsement: Sawant, challengers fail to shine as District 3 candidates make lackluster showing in 43rd Dems endorsements vote

It was Sawant vs. DeWolf Tuesday night — and nobody came out on top

The one time council member Kshama Sawant didn’t want a no endorsement result she got it as the 43rd District Democrats failed to reach agreement on a single District 3 candidate with a standing-room crowd at the University of Washington’s Kane Hall Tuesday night. After two ballots, the attendees were unable to come to an agreement on an endorsement, even when the field was whittled down from the six candidates to Seattle Public Schools Board member Zachary DeWolf and Sawant.

This decision signals a splintered electorate where none of the five challengers have truly seized the mantle in taking on a polarizing incumbent and that anything could happen in the next two months before the August top-two primary. It also could be a sign of things to come in a summer of political races featuring an unprecedentedly huge field of candidates.

The first ballot Tuesday was inconclusive, leaving DeWolf and Sawant to duke it out on a second round. The All Home King County staffer received votes on 46% of ballots in the first set, while the incumbent was on 42%.

“These kids have hope and they cannot wait for us any longer to act,” said DeWolf, catching his breath after arriving a few minutes late to speak as he was running from another school graduation ceremony. “Please do not let them into a world where people are sleeping outside, where people are going hungry, where our cities crumbling because of the climate crisis. We owe it to these kids to deliver results so that they can be proud of the world that they’re living in.”

Unlike in last month’s contentious 37th District Democrats endorsement process, which resulted in a complicated ‘no consensus’ decision after three and a half hours and four ballots, the 43rd’s Democratic Party allows for the endorsement of a candidate outside of the party, such as Sawant of Socialist Alternative. Continue reading

Man suffers serious injuries after pinned by construction vehicle on E Pine sidewalk — UPDATE

A person using a walker suffered serious injuries after being struck and trapped by the trailer of a flatbed truck on the sidewalk in an incident Tuesday night along E Pine.

Seattle Fire and Seattle Police rushed to the scene just a block from Fire Station 25 and the East Precinct around 6 PM to the report of the work truck hauling construction equipment up on the sidewalk on the north side of E Pine just above 12th Ave. Continue reading

‘With just a few strands of beads and an ambitious dream,’ Fresh Tangerine joins Pike/Pine’s growing shopping and fashion mix

Kogane (Image: Fresh Tangerine)

A Seattle creative entrepreneur who got her start with an Etsy “side hustle” has chosen Capitol Hill for a new home to showcase her retail creations.

Seattle jewelry and luxury goods brand Fresh Tangerine has opened its second shop on E Pine in the Odd Fellows Building next door to Molly Moon’s. It will celebrate its grand opening Thursday.

“Fresh Tangerine is known for its delicate designs, unexpected details and affordable quality,” the announcement of the new shop reads. “Their selection includes hand-forged stacker rings, earrings, bracelets, geometric necklaces, and more.” Continue reading

£20 for a boiled egg, one piece of toast, a mug of tea… and CHS community news?

CHS is pay what you can community news.

What does that mean?

Well, for one, it means we need to run a small subscriber drive every now and then to get our numbers up to help pay for things like reporters and photographers covering multiple important District 3 candidate events this week and bringing on our new summer 2019 intern.

You might have missed our pushes and promos for the drive — but you also might not have.

Not everybody subscribes. Anywhere from 5,000 to 10,000 people read the site — every day! As of the minute I’m writing this, we have 714 monthly subscribers and another 112 annuals. Thanks for your support! You’re the best 10 to 15% of an audience ever and we appreciate you helping make CHS possible. We’re hoping to add a dozen or so more new subscribers before the end of the month so we can put the drive promos back in the closet.

If you haven’t subscribed yet and aren’t 100% sold on the concept of pay what you can, maybe breakfast will sway you.

This week, a small cafe in London went viral for its “£20 For Boiled Egg, Tea And Toast” breakfast. Egg and Bread cafe in the north of London is a “pay what you feel” restaurant where patrons can give as little or as much as they like for their food. Breakfast is good for you and those that can pay more for a good start to their days are encouraged to do so. Egg and Bread keeps it both clever and simple. It is partly a DIY experience with an “egg boiling station” where “you pop your egg in a little holder and then lower it into the boiler.” You’ll even toast your own bread.

At CHS, we also try to keep it simple and clever though we’ll probably handle the toasting and egg boiling of daily news for you. But we, too, believe in making sure everybody has a good start to their days with news, information, and more about the neighborhoods and streets where you live. We hope you’ll consider picking up the tab — whether it is £20 or £2 — and helping us keep CHS pay what you can. Subscribe today.

Thanks for reading.