SPD investigating two shooting targets left on Capitol Hill

The used shooting target left at the 18th and Madison office (Photo: LWVS-KC)

The used shooting target left at the 18th and Madison office (Photo: LWVS-KC)

Seattle police are investigating why two paper shooting targets riddled with bullet holes were left outside within a block of each other this month on Capitol Hill. The first was reported by staff at the League of Women Voters  at 18th and Madison, in what a spokesperson said was likely an attempt at intimidation for the groups’s recent endorsement of gun control legislation. The target was left outside the nonprofit’s door sometime over the 4th of July weekend.

CHS found out about the second shooting target on Friday when a CHS tipster emailed us after seeing it posted on a tree near the Shell gas station at 17th and Madison.

“I didn’t take a photo but there were bullet holes similar to the one left at LWV,” said the tipster in an email.

The tipster made a report to SPD, but a police spokesperson was unable to provide CHS with any details at the time. On Monday SPD said they had little information on who might be behind the targets and asked anyone with knowledge of the targets to call 911. From SPD’s Blotter: Continue reading

Here’s where 10 Pronto bike share stations are planned for Capitol Hill

Screen-Shot-2014-05-25-at-10.11.00-PM-400x406The City of Seattle has quietly begun notifying neighbors and neighboring businesses around ten Capitol Hill locations where planners have applied to place stations for the new Pronto bike share system slated to begin service across Seattle later this year.

A permit notice from the proposed station near 14th and John is below. The ten locations where permits have been submitted are spread across the core of the Hill with an apparent focus on grocery stores — four of the ten are located near Safeway, two QFCs and a Trader Joe’s. There will be a station adjacent Cal Anderson Park but not Volunteer Park.

Screen Shot 2014-07-21 at 11.35.32 AMWith concerns about how an open, point-to-point bike share service will perform on Seattle’s hilly terrain, seven of the ten planned Hill stations are located at Broadway-elevation or higher. All are planned to replace at least one street parking space to make room for the rental racks and service kiosk installations.

Boosted by a major sponsorship from Alaska Airlines, Seattle’s system lags behind programs in several other major cities. Seattle’s new system will begin with 500 bikes. Each station will have docks for 12 to 20 bikes and will feature a kiosk where non-members can sign up for 24-hour, or multiday passes, and or access bikes using a code. Those who pay $85 for an annual membership will be able to bypass the kiosk and check bikes out directly from their docks. In order for Pronto to operate in compliance with Washington helmet laws, each station will also have a “helmet dispensing” device, and a helmet return bin. Helmets will be available to rent for $2, will be sanitized after each use, and cycled out after a certain number of uses. A 24-hour pass will cost $8 or you can get three days for $16. Planners are collecting feedback on possible station locations from the community but have not yet announced the permit applications.

The permit notices include a September 1st start date.

CHS Pics | Small turnout for Cal Anderson safety fair

IMG_1554

Chief O’Toole addresses attendees

IMG_1410A lot of concerns have been expressed about the state of safety on the streets at night around Capitol Hill but Sunday afternoon in Cal Anderson Park, only a small crowd gathered for some martial arts training and to hear new SPD Chief Kathleen O’Toole talk about public safety. Other recent self defense workshops with a focus on specific communities have proven popular in Seattle. With the small turnout in Cal Anderson, there might be a few interested in learning more who couldn’t attend. Check in with organizer Social Outreach Seattle to learn more about future opportunities.

IMG_1450

Block Party faces its future in a developing Capitol Hill

8445426339_94a0fd7a7f_o

BiIbnqBFAha6NrRZa3oSmY_BJMDsfoDU73YAw99qzVo

(Image: Alex Crick for CHS)

IMG_9020

Capitol Hill Block Party wants to keep the heart of the neighborhood alive as so much of it changes.

In its 18th year, the weekend event which closes down six blocks of Pike/Pine and draws upward of 30,000 music lovers remains an annual subject of excitement from fans and the rarest of summer musical festival beasts: a three-day commercial concert venue carved out of a living, breathing city neighborhood.

With A$AP Rocky, Chromeo and Spoon headlining this year, rock fest tourists and plenty of locals will once again swarm the cordoned-off area in the heart of Pike/Pine starting July 25 for a weekend of sights, sounds and selling your soul for a parking space.

Only in America
Owner Jason Lajeunesse has not needed the Capitol Hill Block Party to make his mark on the neighborhood. CHS dubbed him one of the ‘Princes of Pike/Pine’ — along with business partner and frequent collaborator David Meinert – due to his extensive stakes in many nearby restaurants and venues, including Neumos and Lost Lake.

After spending nine years planning the Block Party’s music as co-producer, Lajeunesse took ownership of the event in 2012.

He believes Capitol Hill Block Party is a product of the neighborhood which gives it its name.

“I think it’s important to promote the neighborhood year round,” he said. “The Block Party sort of grew with the local and regional bands. As the bands got bigger, so did the Block Party.”

With four indoor venues, two outdoor stages and dozens of restaurants and bars in the area, the Block Party has the distinction of being the only event of its kind in America.

“To our knowledge Capitol Hill Block Party is unique as the only ticketed three-day street festival in the country,” Chris Swenson, program manager with the Seattle Office of Film and Music, said. “It’s a little like scooping up half of Sasquatch and plopping it in the middle of a neighborhood for a weekend. The city’s primary concern is safety and, because of the unique layout of the event, each year safety officials and agencies spend many months establishing organizer requirements and emergency plans specific to the site.” Continue reading

Yancy Noll murder trial pushed back to September

The trial for the man accused of gunning down a Broadway Market QFC wine steward in 2012 is slated to begin next month, according to court documents. The trial for Thomasdinh Bowman in the murder of Yancy Noll is now scheduled to start September 22nd after it was initially slated to begin in February. According to court documents, prosecutors expect the proceedings to last three to four weeks.

In September 2012, Bowman was charged with first-degree murder for allegedly shooting Noll in the head outside Noll’s at 15th Ave NE and 75th home. King County prosecutors have called it a “thrill kill” case. If convicted, prosecutors say Bowman, a former child prodigy and onetime resident of the E Republican Melrose Terrace co-op building, will face up to 31 years in prison.

Bowman’s defense attorney John Henry Browne entered a plea of not guilty on charges Bowman gunned down Noll in his vehicle just blocks from each of their homes. According to charging documents, Bowman pulled his car next to Noll’s at 15th Ave NE and 75th and shot Noll in the head. The two men are believed to have never met prior to the shooting.

12th Ave theft ring trial

Police seize allegedly stolen items from Darling’s Capitol Hill house in 2012. (Photo: CHS)

Police seize allegedly stolen items from Darling’s Capitol Hill house in 2012. (Photo: CHS)

Also scheduled for trial in September is the Capitol Hill man arrested in 2012 for allegedly running a sophisticated operation to sell stolen goods from his 12th and Mercer home.

Prosecutors say Rabindranath Darling was buying items he knew to be stolen and selling them on eBay. Darling, who pleaded not guilty in the case, is scheduled to appear in court September 2nd.

When police raided the 12th Ave house in November 2012, they needed a trailer to haul off all the evidence. Computers, tools, and bikes with an estimated worth of “well in excess of $100,000″ were allegedly found throughout the Capitol Hill property. Police reported finding a shed filled with professional grade musical mixing equipment, scuba gear, Tiffany brand jewelry, and “a large amount of one brand of makeup.” Boxes in the basement contained Rolex watches and expensive data storage equipment. Many items would later be traced to past burglaries around Capitol Hill and Seattle.

Pikes/Pines | The bats of Capitol Hill — social, insect eating, possibly older than you

This little brown miotis calls a Capitol Hill attic home. It might also be older than you. (Image: Brendan McGarry)

This little brown miotis calls a Capitol Hill attic home. It might also be older than you. (Image: Brendan McGarry)

Long summer nights are one of the reasons we put up with Pacific Northwest’s dreary winters. Nothing is better than a cool evening in the park. Plus, this time of year, when we recline the grass and look to the sky during dusk, we get the added treat of seeing bats. Now, that last statement may not be exactly what you expected, let alone one you wholeheartedly agree with, but I’d like you to take a moment and appreciate Capitol Hill’s bats.

Possibly you’ll never appreciate their bizarre visages, but at the very least appreciate the work they do for us. Bats may be our best natural defense against many of our pest insects, gobbling them up efficiently during much of the night. When we see bats cruising overhead or over the water, they’re hunting using echolocation, which may be obvious but is a feat unto itself. Being insectivorous isn’t merely a nice thing for mosquito free evenings either. The US Geological Survey reports that they provide an agricultural service of pest removal of up to $53 billion (that, however, is the high estimate). Continue reading

One year ago this week on Capitol Hill

IMG_8274-600x400Here are the top CHS posts from this week in 2013:

  1. Reddit, street closure fuel rumors of Macklemore Broadway Dick’s video shoot
  2. Home selected for Capitol Hill’s parklet experiment — one of first three in Seattle
  3. Changes at Q as club co-founder steps aside
  4. Dick’s Broadway Block Party: Legendary Seattle drive-in plans 60th anniversary party on Capitol Hill
  5. Rape suspect busted after victim in 12th/Olive St attack waves down police
  6. New crime trend hits Capitol Hill grocery stores: milk shoplifting
  7. Capitol Hill Block Party 2013: Day One Open Thread

 

CHS Crow | Matt and Ali — “I was like, ‘Yeah I’m gonna ride a bull’”

This time around, CHS Crow met a virus scientist with some tricks up his sleeve and an interior designer with a flower-powered business plan as the summer sun was setting in Volunteer Park. Get acquainted!

  Matt

Years old: 38  Day job: Post-doc researcher at UW’s medical chemistry department, studying the Lambda virus. Curricular: Bachelors in recombinant genetics at Western Kentucky U.; doctorate at UW. Extracurriculars: Hiking, snowboarding, “small electronics projects,” “microcontroller programming.”  Has lived on Hill: 4 years Moved here from: Kentucky, with a few years in Northgate in between. Secret skill: “Amateur magician.”

2014.07 CHS Crow portrait, MattWhat’s a major challenge you’ve overcome?
I was in jail for a while. In my younger, partier, days I was a bit of a substance abuser if you will. I’ve been clean and sober since then obviously, to get my life turned around.

And it was kind of a big deal because, you know, I lost my scholarship. I almost was not allowed to go back to college for a while. It looked like it might have been a real game-changer for a little while.

And then not too long after that I met my wife, and finished school, and went to graduate school, and moved out here. And it’s been great. I love it out here. Continue reading

CHS Pics | This week in Capitol Hill pictures


The CHS Flickr Pool contains more than 18,000 19,000 20,000 21,000 photographs — most of Capitol Hill images, many glorious, some technically amazing. The pool is a mix of contributions from Capitol Hill — and nearby — shutterbugs. Interested in being part of it? If we like your photo and it helps us tell the story, we may feature it on CHS so please include your name and/or a link to your website so we can properly credit you. Interested in working as a paid CHS contributor for scheduled assignments? Drop us a line – our roster is full for general assignments but pitch us on an idea.

Continue reading

Stuff the Bus to help new Westside Baby/St. Joseph’s Baby Corner team help families

(Image: WestSide Baby)

(Image: WestSide Baby)

St. Joseph’s Baby Corner on 18th near Cherry and WestSide Baby merged into one organization in an effort to help Seattle families make ends meet. Sunday, there’s an opportunity to help the new team.

“We have kept the heart of serving local children in need and are excited to bring our expertise and watch it blossom and thrive in Capitol Hill,” WestSide Baby executive director Nancy Woodland said. “We actually modeled ourselves after St. Joseph’s Baby Corner and are excited to come in and increase services.”

The two organizations collect second hand items for babies and children that providers such as social workers or other agencies distribute to families in need.
Continue reading

Police capture suspect accused in 29/King murders

The suspect Seattle Police say killed two Seattle men in a “premeditated” and “unprovoked” June 1st attack at 29th and King after a night out on Capitol Hill has been captured by authorities after a weeks-long manhunt.

Ali Muhammed Brown, charged with two counts of murder in the slaying of 27-year-old Ahmed Said and 23-year-old Dwone Anderson-Young, was arrested Friday in New Jersey: 

Essex County, New Jersey Prosecutor’s Homicide Task Force and West Orange, New Jersey police arrested Seattle double-murder suspect Ali Muhammed Brown on warrant charges earlier this afternoon. Brown was arrested without incident and the investigation is ongoing. Seattle Police and King County Prosecutor’s Office representatives will be monitoring this case very closely.

“I want to thank the Seattle Police Department, the West Orange Police Department and the Essex County Prosecutor’s Office for their diligent efforts to bring Mr. Brown into custody,” Mayor Ed Murray said in a statement released by SPD. “All of our communities are safer today as a result. I hope his arrest brings some initial measure of closure to the families of Dwone Anderson-Young and Ahmed Said.”

“Seattle Police Homicide detectives have been working on this case relentlessly since day one. I personally offer my thanks to them and every other local, state and federal law enforcement official involved in the search for Mr. Brown and his eventual capture,” said Chief Kathleen O’Toole in the same statement.

Police say Brown shot the two men to death at 29th and King after a night out on Capitol Hill.

Details from court documents have described an attack possibly involving a hookup sex app. A friend of the two murdered men who saw them at R Place earlier in the night told police Said spent much of the evening on his phone and that he believed Said was using an app “like Grindr or Jack’d” — “These are phone apps on which gay men meet up with other gay men,” the police report noted. This friend told police he also saw the stranger with Said and Anderson-Young that night as they left R Place. That friend later identified the suspect Brown out of a police photo montage. Detectives were also able to retrieve video surveillance from a nearby business showing the suspect and Said and Anderson-Young together. Police say shell casings at the murder scene matched a 9 MM Smith and Wesson semiautomatic pistol purchased by the mother of Brown’s children that she said had gone missing. Police found Brown’s fingerprints and three spent 9mm shell casings inside Said’s car

Here’s why there are pianos in Cal Anderson and Volunteer Park


Inspired, perhaps, by the great Rancho Bravo piano installation of 2011, a new campaign has placed two pianos on surprising Capitol Hill stages. Thanks to Pianos in the Parks, you’ll find “artistically enhanced” uprights ready for the playing inside Cal Anderson and Volunteer Park:

Pianos in the Parks features 20 artistically enhanced pianos created by Gage Academy of Art faculty, students and friends, each placed in one of 15 iconic Seattle city parks and open spaces, such as Alki Park, Cal Anderson Park, and Seattle Center, and five King County Parks locations, including Marymoor Park and the Sammamish River Trail.

Continue reading