Downtown Dog Lounge leaving Capitol Hill

Just as the plans for Capitol Hill’s first cat cafe are finally taking shape, one of its longest running canine-focused businesses is getting ready to move out.

The Downtown Dog Lounge has been getting its furry clients ready for the big change on E Denny Way for a while now but officially announced its planned departure this week after 10 years on Capitol Hill: Continue reading

Elliott Bay Book Company-friendly buyer found for Capitol Hill’s Ford Building

(Image: Hunters Capital)

(Image: Hunters Capital)

Hunters Capital, owners of the Ford Building, which houses Elliott Bay Book Company, the Little Oddfellows cafe, and fashion retailer Totokaelo, have found a likely buyer for the property.

Jill Cronauer, Chief Operating Officer with Hunters, said the company has a letter of intent with a local buyer.

“It’s not some big, national conglomerate,” Mike Oaksmith, director of development at Hunters said at a Monday Pike/Pine Urban Neighborhood Council meeting.

The potential buyer’s identity and any agreements on price are under wraps for now. Continue reading

Parks board to consider making shorter Broadway Hill hours permanent

(Image: CHS)

(Image: CHS)

Following a nine-month pilot of shortened hours for Broadway Hill Park since its 2016 summer opening, the Board of Park Commissioners will consider making those hours permanent on Thursday.

Rachel Schulkin with Seattle Parks and Recreation said the pilot of opening the park at 6 AM and closing it at 10 PM was spurred by a mix of what parks employees were seeing in the park and complaints from area residents.

Staff reported finding beer cans and damaged benches in the park, graffiti had been an issue, 911 calls about loud, late-night activities were frequent, and members of the community reported feeling unsafe in the park in the evening. Continue reading

Serious crash tangles John near Capitol Hill Station

(Image: Matt Mitgang via Twitter)

(Image: Matt Mitgang via Twitter)

One person had to be cut of a crashed vehicle and police were investigating after a two-vehicle collision at John and 10th tied up rush hour traffic and added to street safety concerns on the increasingly busy streets around Capitol Hill Station. There was also a report of a pedestrian possibly injured in the crash.

UPDATE: ‪SFD says patient removed from the crashed car was a female in her 30s. Her injuries were reported as not life threatening. The report of a pedestrian injured in the crash was apparently a mistake in the early confusion at the crash scene.

Seattle Fire was called to the scene around 5:20 PM to a report of the collision. One victim was removed from a car involved in the crash by a fire crew that sliced through the vehicle’s roof.

Police were at the scene to close off John to traffic and begin the investigation of the collision. UPDATE 3/23/2017 9:00 AM: A department spokesperson tells CHS the initial response to the scene was quickly downgraded after the situation as sorted out and a full traffic collision investigation was not necessary due in part to the lack of any serious injuries. There did not appear to be any citations issued to drivers of either of the two vehicles involved in the crash.

The intersection is part of an area identified for pedestrian and street safety improvements. SDOT began gathering feedback on proposed improvements including curb bulbs and plastic posts for the John Thomas corridor this week. Meanwhile, CHS reported that the city has also decided to add left turn lanes on John and E Olive Way at Broadway as well as add an all-way crosswalk at Broadway and Denny after a car struck a pedestrian and other near misses were reported near the busy transit station.

With a ‘catarium’ and sheltered friends looking for homes, Neko Cat Cafe coming to the kitty-corner of Belmont and Pine

It’s not every project on Capitol Hill that comes with approval from the health department specifying rules for the “catarium” —

At all times, the designated cat support employee must always remain in the catrium and cat support function areas. This includes when the cat support employee starts and ends his or her shift. The only exception would be to use the restroom located in the café area. The cat support employee is not allowed in the office, scullery area, and the espresso bar. Please provide a locker or equivalent for your cat support employee to accommodate this requirement.

After more than a year of buzz, Neko Cat Cafe has found a Capitol Hill home at Belmont and Pine below the Annapolis Apartments. Here is the announcement from owner Caitlin Unsell:

We came, we hunted, we pounced. NEKO is officially coming to Capitol Hill this summer! That’s right people, it’s time to squad up and get your cat on. We’ve planted our paws on the corner of Pine and Belmont in the heart of Capitol Hill.
Continue reading

98 or so ideas for Capitol Hill and Central District streets and parks

Pac Man

The city asked for ideas, and the people have responded.

The first phase of the Your Voice, Your Choice program wrapped up in February, and brought in 894 ideas about how to spend $2 million across the city on smaller infrastructure projects – those with a budget of $90,000 or less. About 11% of the ideas came out of City Council District 3, centered on Capitol Hill and the Central District. Tuesday night, the penultimate effort to winnow that list down to a manageable eight projects gathered in the Central District at the Douglas Truth Library. Here are some of the District 3 safe streets and open space ideas they were wrangling.

The largest single category on Capitol Hill and the Central District seemed to do with either making it easier for people to cross streets, or forcing cars to slow down. Continue reading

Blotter | Man busted on Capitol Hill with car prowl booty

See something others should know about? Email CHS or call/txt (206) 399-5959. You can view recent CHS Crime coverage here.

(Image: SPD)

Five mp3 players?1?!? (Image: SPD)

  • Car prowl booty bust: A Monday arrest of a warrant suspect on E Olive Way turned up a trove of phones and credit cards police say were taken in car prowls across the city:
    Officers Chris Myers and James Olson were on bike patrol in the 800 block of East Olive Way around 2:30 PM when they spotted a 37-year-old man they knew was wanted on a misdemeanor warrant. After arresting the man, officers found two debit cards and several sets of house and vehicle keys in the man’s pockets. Inside the man’s backpack, police found three laptops, 14 cellphones, five mp3 players, nine different ID and credit cards, financial documents and mail addressed to residents in Capitol Hill, Sammamish, Bellevue and Vashon Island, WA.
    Police say several of the items had been taken in recent car prowls on Capitol Hill and Queen Anne. During the arrest, the man claimed he had swallowed heroin and was taken to Harborview Medical Center, where he was examined, cleared, and then booked into the King County Jail for possession of stolen property and his warrant, SPD reports.
  • Neighbours alley beating: A man who woke up after he says he was beaten in the alley behind Neighbours after being denied entry to the club told police he believed he had also been robbed of his wallet and phone in the incident. According to SPD, the victim contacted police the day following the early morning March 11th beating to report the robbery. The victim and his friend told police they were intoxicated but don’t know why they were denied entry and why a bouncer allegedly dragged the victim into the alley. Neither witness could provide many details of what happened but the victim said he awoke after being knocked out and made his way home to recover. When he awoke that morning, he discovered his wallet and phone were missing. The responding police officer noted the victim had injuries to his face from an attack but said it was unlikely there would be any video evidence showing what transpired: Continue reading

Olive Tree’s new Capitol Hill branch now open on 15th Ave E

The flavors of the Mediterranean — by way of Kent — are now resident on 15th Ave E. Olive Tree opened this week in the space of a short-lived Latin American restaurant and a long-lived Bagel Deli.

CHS talked earlier this year with  Zana Abdulaziz who opened the first Olive Tree in Kent with his brother-in-law Ranj Rebwar in 2009. Abdulaziz told CHS the business partners chose 15th Ave E because it is a community-based neighborhood in the midst of the busy Capitol Hill restaurant scene. “We have an amazing product,” Abdulaziz told CHS last month. “We have an amazing vision of what we’re trying to do. If Olive Tree is to take off, Capitol Hill is the place to make it happen.” Continue reading

Civic duty: Last chance to weigh in on Madison BRT — bikes, 12th/Union, enforcement

The Madison Bus Rapid Transit online open house closes Wednesday night and, because you’re human and may have put off getting to it and because we’re human and did a poor job of making it clear when the deadline for online comment was, here is your reminder/push to weigh in on what just might be the last big infrastructure investment around the Hill before you move to Tacoma.

You can see a presentation on the details of the planned changes to Madison and provide feedback at MadisonStreetBRT.participate.online.

Here are a few ideas for aspects of the $120 million project to weigh in on. Continue reading

Inside I-126, Seattle’s $275 homelessness levy: shelter, health, housing

Homeless people in Seattle may be getting more assistance in the form of programs funded by a $275 million property tax levy proposed by Mayor Ed Murray — if voters agree. The money is substantial, and the proposed spending in some ways aligns with what the homeless themselves say they could use the most.

Signature gathering is underway to put I-126 on the August ballot. “The Seattle skyline visible from this location is a symbol the city’s economic strength and growth, but from the exact same vantage point you can see the people and community that that same progress has left behind and made more vulnerable,” Downtown Emergency Service Center director Daniel Malone who co-chaired the advisory committee that developed the measure said about the start of the effort. “We all know that the problem of homelessness has been growing rapidly. We need to step and do more to help the people suffering on our streets, and this carefully considered measure will do that.”

The measure would last five years and nearly double what the city currently spends on aid to homeless people. The levy will cost about 27 cents per thousand dollars of assessed value for homeowners. For the city’s median homeowner — Zillow puts that at a $513,200 home — that would mean $138.51 per year. Continue reading