Will workers bring Little Big Burger’s Little Big Union to Capitol Hill?

(Image: Little Big Union)

Portland’s Little Big Burger is coming to Capitol Hill soon. iIs workers could bring a fast food labor movement here, too.

In mid-March, Little Big Burger workers in Portland, led by staff at one location, went public with their decision to unionize, a rarity for fast food personnel, following issues of safety, scheduling, and what it says are inadequate pay raises. After talking to workers at other locations of the chain, workers realized that their concerns were widespread across restaurants.

“Conditions, you know, needed to change,” said Cameron Crowell, a union member who has worked at Little Big Burger in Portland for two years.

The union’s demands include $5 raises, two weeks of both paid sick leave and vacation time, fair and consistent scheduling ahead of time, and time and a half for all federal holidays, according to its website. Continue reading

Reminder: Capitol Hill Homelessness Forum Thursday night

Representatives from the City of Seattle and organizations focused on homelessness will be part of a panel Thursday night at the Broadway Performance Hall:

Capitol Hill Homelessness Forum

The Capitol Hill Homelessness Forum is being organized by the Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce to explore “what is being done” and “how you can help” when it comes to homelessness, shelter, and services. Continue reading

Dozens of shots but no reported injuries in shootout near 23rd and Jackson

There were no reported injuries as bursts of gunfire rattled the area around 23rd and Jackson and put nearby schools in lockdown Wednesday afternoon.

Seattle Police rushed to the reported shooting scene near 23rd and Main just after 2 PM after a report of dozens of gunshots. According to East Precinct radio dispatches, police were searching for two to three suspects reportedly armed with handguns seen by witnesses as the melee broke out. Some witnesses reported that the shooters appeared to be juveniles and at least one possible suspect was reportedly riding a bicycle as he fled the scene. Police were also looking for vehicles possibly involved in the shootout. Continue reading

On the List | Passover-Easter-4/20, egg hunts, Wa Na Wari, Small Mouth Sounds

Sometimes the Easter Bunny shows up at Block Party (Image: CHS)

This week’s a big one for lovers of holidays. Although it all depends on the object or subject of worship, there’s something for nearly everyone this Easter weekend and start of Passover. Chabad of Capitol Hill hosts a Traditional Passover Seder (April 19, 7:30 pm) with hand-made Shmutah Matzah and kosher wine. There’s also Easter Sunday (check out the list below for Easter egg hunts plus Easter dinner and brunch specials on and near the Hill), which is bookended by the holy days of green festivities, 4/20 and Earth Day. Redhook Brewlab is folding the two holidays into one weekend of “IPA Daze” fun, which includes a beach clean up, a baby goat farm and “psychedelic coloring.” At Broadway Performance Hall, comedians try to tell jokes while getting a little too high while Uncle Ike’s in the CD will have a bouncy house and climbing wall as part of its 4/20 celebration.  If you’d rather bow down to David Byrne’s genius or the Satanic Temple, the Northwest Film Forum and SIFF’s Egyptian Theatre have you covered. For more profane fun: Bar Sue’s hosting its sixth annual pickled egg eating contest while over at Vios, Bagel-buffs get their last (at least for now) chance to get a taste of Matthew Segal’s kick-ass bagels. Check out this week’s to-do list below, plus find more events on the CHS Calendar.

WEDNESDAY, April 17: While hurtling through space on his way to the International Space Station (ISS), South Korea’s first astronaut, Ko San, did not miss the taste of his favorite foods. The Korea Aerospace Research Institute made sure there was kimchi for him. Such is the devotion kimchi — a traditional fermented Korean side dish made out of Napa cabbage, daikon radish, and Korean red pepper flakes — inspires. At The Works, learn about the history of the condiment and how to make your own.  The Works, 6 PM Continue reading

At The Garage, Bowlero hopes to keep the ‘vibe’ without throwing a Capitol Hill gutter ball on ‘authenticity’

In the midst of a West Coast expansion, the folks at the New York City-based Bowlero company want you to know this about its plans for Capitol Hill bowling alley and pool hall The Garage:

“The core is that we’re going to keep that vibe, keep the authenticity,” Bowlero spokesperson Colie Edison tells CHS, confirming our report last week that the AMF family of bowling focused companies was taking over the 1996-founded Broadway bowling alley from its founding ownership with plans for an overhaul that will update the bowling center with an arcade and bar and food service.

Edison said no name change is planned for the venue and that while the currently 21and over bar setting for the Garage will likely give away to an all ages setup, she still expects times when the 1130 Broadway hangout will be adults only for nightlife hours.

The sale is not necessarily a time for congratulations for longtime owner Mike Bitondo. He and business partner Alex Rosenast founded the Garage two decades ago after a chance run-in with the property’s owner at a Mariner’s game. Three years ago, Bitondo bought his partner out so he could spend more time with family and away from the day to day grind of owning a business.

Now Bitondo is also ready to step away. Continue reading

Walkout at Seattle Central part of call for state to provide more funding for community colleges

Students joined faculty and staff at walkouts across the Seattle Colleges system Tuesday including a rally on Broadway outside Seattle Central to support legislation currently being considered in Olympia to more fully fund Washington’s community and technical colleges.

“The walkout is intended to illustrate the crisis faced by the community and technical colleges (CTC) because of the State Legislature’s failure to adequately fund programs, salaries and student support,” organizers from the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) local 1789 wrote. “For over a decade, the State has covered only 65% of college expenses, while increases in student tuition, budget cuts, and reserve money have attempted to cover the gap.” Continue reading

‘High tech dog houses’ where you can park your pup coming to Capitol Hill

(Image: DogSpot)

For the first time in 50 years, Seattle has more than 100,000 children. But we all know there are way more fur babies on Capitol Hill.

If it comes to being the most dog-friendly city in the US, Seattle is top dog. That’s according to real estate broker Redfin and Rover, the Uber for dog sitters and walkers. The companies compiled a list of cities with the highest amounts of dog walkers, sitters and walks, and combined the data with the amount of home sale listings that mention “dog”. Both Seattle-based companies announced that their hometown was the number 1 dog-friendly city. Chicago and Denver came in second and third.

Brooklyn-based company DogSpot has come to the same conclusion: People in Seattle love dogs (and walking them). Next month, the company will install six high tech dog houses — to leave Fido in while shopping — in the Seattle area, including on the Hill, in a partnership with supermarket chain QFC.

“Seattle’s a tech-friendly and dog-obsessed city,” says Rebecca Eyre, director of communications at DogSpot. “Those things make it an amazing market for us.” Continue reading

Sawant says she will make new push on Seattle rent control, ordinance against ‘Economic Evictions’

(Image: Seattle City Council)

Building on recommendations from the Seattle Renters’ Commission, City Council member Kshama Sawant announced two measures Monday aimed would alleviate some of the burden for Seattle renters. The first is a proposal to enact a Seattle rent control ordinance. The second, the Economic Evictions Assistance Ordinance, would look to protect tenants against substantial rent increases.

“We have two choices,” Sawant said at a Monday morning press conference at City Hall to announce her planned proposals. “One, just sit on our hands and expect that some day, in the distant future, the Democratic establishment will gather the courage to break from the real estate lobby and finally stand with us. We’ve done that kind of waiting for 40 years.”

“Or we can begin the fight here.” Continue reading

Provider selected for program to restore homelessness outreach to Broadway

The Seattle Human Services Department made an announcement Monday on a key decision that will put homelessness outreach workers back on the streets around Broadway.

The city department’s selection panel has chosen Evergreen Treatment Center’s REACH program to fulfill its $244,400 portion of a new effort to put the workers into action in three neighborhoods: Capitol Hill, the International District/Chinatown, and First Hill.

“Outreach services are defined as efforts to approach and engage someone with the objective of developing a relationship of trust and connecting that person with resources. Services may include addressing a person’s survival needs, providing health and other education, facilitating access to available services such as diversion or emergency shelter, and establishing ongoing, trusting relationships,” HSD says. Continue reading

Lynching graffiti found at Seattle Central investigated as hate crime

Racist graffiti in a stairwell at Capitol Hill’s Seattle Central College condemned by the school president in a letter to the campus community is being investigated as a hate crime, a Seattle Police spokesperson tells CHS.

The letter from Dr. Sheila Edwards Lange references black marker graffiti showing “several bodies hanging from ropes” found in March in the school’s stairway B of the Broadway Edison building. Lange said an ominous message accompanied the drawings — “Damn your strange fruit.”

Continue reading