Wanted: $55K to return homelessness outreach workers to Capitol Hill

At night, Seattle City Hall becomes an emergency shelter (Image: CHS)

The effort to fund homelessness outreach workers on Capitol Hill has shifted — the good news is the price is more clear but the challenge now will be getting City Hall and the Seattle City Council to find a way to help pay for it in time.

“Of all the central downtown neighborhoods, only Capitol Hill, First Hill, and Chinatown/ID don’t currently have homeless outreach services,” Egan Orion, director of the Broadway Business Improvement Area said. “We saw in the two-year pilot on Capitol Hill how single point of contact for businesses and residents alike and a full-time advocate for our unsheltered neighbors on the streets was a very compassionate and effective approach to issues of homelessness on the Hill.” Continue reading

‘Save Saba’ — Sawant rallies support to protect 12th Ave Ethiopian restaurant, ‘stop gentrification in our community’

The 300-unit mixed-use building destined for the block

Inside Saba (Image: Saba Ethiopian Cuisine)

As her efforts to “Save the Showbox” continue to reverberate in Seattle land use and legal circles, District 3 representative Kshama Sawant is also putting her political muscle behind Saba, a 12th Ave Ethiopian restaurant facing displacement that has served the neighborhood for nearly 20 years.

“We need your support to call on the current owner, as well as any future owner, to negotiate an agreement that protects Saba Ethiopian Cuisine,” the petition Sawant has championed from Saba Tekle, daughter of the restaurant’s owner, reads. “The new owner could relocate the restaurant across the street, or temporarily relocate the restaurant while new construction is underway.”

Sawant first drew attention to the plight of Saba in September as she included the story of Workie Wubushet’s restaurant in an op-ed about Mayor Jenny Durkan’s budget proposal.

As of Sunday night, the petition calling for the restaurant to be protected has more than 900 signatures. Continue reading

A lesson in ‘Teaching for Black Lives’ from Garfield High

By Carolyn Bick

In the one high school honors class Jesse Hagopian was in, his mostly white peers laughed at him when he stumbled over some words as he read aloud to the rest of the class.

“Being one of the only students of color in the classroom, that pretty much shut down my attention or will to participate in that class,” Hagopian recalled. “School was a challenge to me. I never thought I’d ever be a teacher. I wanted to get away from school.”

Growing up, the Garfield High School ethnic studies teacher had very few teachers of color in his school career, and did not see any Black people reflected in his curriculum, until college. It was a “very alienating experience,” he said. It didn’t leave him any room to discuss or explore his identity as a Black and mixed race person, or help him appreciate the contributions Black people have made to society. Continue reading

Police can’t find gunman — or intended target — after overnight Capitol Hill shootout

Police found shell casings but couldn’t located the shooter or the possible intended target after a volley of gunfire on Capitol Hill early Saturday morning.

911 calls began around 3:30 AM with reports of up to eight shots fired and glass breaking on Belmont near Pine. Police arrived to find shell casings but the combatants and a vehicle possibly involved in the shootout were nowhere to be found.

Police were searching for two men reportedly seen headed west on Pine toward downtown after the gunfire. Another man seen fleeing north on Belmont during the shootout also could not be located.

There were no arrests and no immediate reports of anybody with a gunshot wound arriving at area emergency rooms.

The gun violence follows the three-month “Operation Triple Beam Jet City” led by the U.S. Marshals office which reportedly rounded up dozens of suspected criminals with gang ties off the streets of Seattle.

CHS Pics | This week in Capitol Hill pictures

The CHS Flickr Pool contains more than 36,000 photographs — most of Capitol Hill images, many glorious, some technically amazing. The pool is a mix of contributions from Capitol Hill — and nearby — shutterbugs. Interested in being part of it? If we like your photo and it helps us tell the story, we may feature it on CHS so please include your name and/or a link to your website so we can properly credit you. Interested in working as a paid CHS contributor for scheduled assignments? Drop us a line.

We also keep our eyes on the #capitolhillseattle Instagram tag —- you should, too! Below are this week’s best Capitol Hill shots. Thanks for sharing! Continue reading

Before fall rains set in, Seattle Public Utilities rescues the Stevens Elementary goldfish

A scene from the rescue (Image: SPU)

Amid worries that coming rains could wash them away to dangerous sewer pipes or sad lives as an invasive species in Lake Washington, the Stevens Elementary goldfish have been rescued by Seattle Public Utilities.

Friday, the department thanked CHS and the many readers who brought attention to the curious little wonder of the “secret” underground pond in the school’s catch basin:

SPU first learned of the goldfish from the Capitol Hill Seattle blog, which reported that the fish had become a “curious kind of campus mascot,” and several community members who reached out to inquire about the possibility of a rescue operation. While SPU was glad to see the fish faring well in the catch basin, it was necessary to relocate them as soon as possible.

Continue reading

Tacos Chukis joins growing family of food and drink around 23rd and Union

That guy up top? That’s Beto Salmeron. He just opened his fourth Tacos Chukis — the largest yet — in the Central District.

CHS told you all about the new 23d and Union taco joint here as it prepared to open last week. Here’s a look inside the Graham Baba-designed restaurant. Continue reading

Here’s your chance to help shape new Pike/Pine protected bike lanes

Planning is underway for new protected Pike/Pine bike lanes, and a community group wants to hear from residents about it.

The idea of protected bike lanes along Pike and Pine streets, connecting existing lanes on 2nd Ave and Broadway has long been in the city’s plans. Earlier this year, there had been some mixed messaging about how high a priority the lanes were, until the City Council in July voted to make them a priority.

The city is hoping that connecting these two sections will help increase bike ridership by forming a connected bike network throughout the core of Seattle.

The plan now is for the lanes to be operational, if not entirely permanent, by the end of 2019. The plan recognizes that there are some complications likely with the western portion of the lanes. Construction on major expansion of the convention center will begin relatively soon. And the “Pike Pine Renaissance” project will reshape the downtown portion of the corridor.

For those reasons, the city is hesitant to spend too much money on bike lanes west of the freeway, only to have them torn up during one of those projects. But there will be something, with plans for interim lanes generally between Bellevue and 2nd Ave.

The Capitol Hill portion of the lanes is likely to be a more permanent section, said Brie Gyncild, who is working on the project with Central Seattle Greenways. The group is sponsoring a workshop to discuss options for how the new lanes might be designed. Continue reading

Blotter | Union F-bomb-L-Word pepper spray attack, QFC ‘serial’ wine shoplifter, Garfield threat

See something others should know about? Email CHS or call/txt (206) 399-5959. You can view recent CHS Crime coverage here.

  • 16/Union pepper spray attack: Police investigated a reported assault at 16th and Union in which the victim said he was pepper sprayed after saying “fuck you lesbians” to a group of three women during an altercation in the street. According to the SPD report on the just before 10 PM Friday, October 12th incident, the victim told police he and his partner were escorting their intoxicated neighbor home when they heard the three women “hollering as if they were having fun.” The victim told police his group joined in, upsetting the trio of women who yelled at the men as they passed. At this point, the victim told police he dropped the f bomb and the L word. As one of the women approached him, the victim told police he began swinging his arms to keep her away from him. The assailant then sprayed the victim in the face with pepper spray. The victim rushed home, showered, and then called 911, he told police. He also told the officer he didn’t believe he had been assaulted because of bias, only a misunderstanding. There were no arrests. Continue reading