Man shot by police after report of armed suicidal male on Melrose Ave — UPDATE

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One person was reported shot in an incident involving Seattle Police on Melrose just south of E Olive Way,

Seattle Police were reporting one suspect was shot and down at the scene in a shooting involving at least three police officers, according to East Precinct radio dispatches. Seattle Fire was called to the scene just after 9:30 PM.

According to police radio, officers were called to the area minutes earlier Tuesday night to a report of a suicidal male armed with a gun.

The man was reported leaving a Melrose Ave apartment building. Arriving officers reported hearing at least one gunshot as they searched for the man. More gunfire was reported in the area minutes later.

UPDATE: SPD has confirmed the incident is an officer involved shooting:

UPDATE x2: Police say the man fired at officers:

Moments after arriving, officers made contact with the armed suspect, and gave him verbal commands to drop his weapon. The suspect shot his firearm at the officers, and officers returned fire, striking him. Officers provided immediate emergency care, and called for Seattle Fire Department medics, who transported the suspect to Harborview Medical Center.

Police have closed off Melrose during the emergency response and investigation in what is likely to be a long process of collecting evidence and interviewing witnesses. Union guild representatives were also called to respond.

Seattle Fire reportedly transported the man who was shot to Harborview but we do not have any information about his condition.

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In deference to neighboring church, ‘graceful’ First Hill apartment tower will rise only 240 feet

Wednesday morning, Mayor Jenny Durkan will be at Capitol Hill Housing’s affordable 12th Ave Arts building to sign into law the expansion of Seattle’s Mandatory Housing Affordability program into neighborhoods across the city including Capitol Hill. Wednesday night, a project to create some 350 new market rate apartments on First Hill will go before the design board for its first review.

While the timing of the eight-story project means its developer won’t be required to pay into the MHA pool — projects vested to a Land Use Code in effect before the upzones won’t be subject to the expanded program — the new development planned for 1100 Boylston will replace a surface parking lot with lots of new First Hill housing.

Design review: 1100 Boylston Ave

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Happy third birthday, Capitol Hill Station

Some 7,698 light rail boardings take place every day at Capitol Hill Station. Tuesday marks the three-year anniversary of the opening of the busy Broadway subway station that has forever changed getting to and from Capitol Hill.

Saturday, March 19th, 2016, then-Mayor Ed Murray and King County Executive Dow Constantine broke out the giant ceremonial scissors to cut the ribbon opening the $110 million station and the start of service on the $1.9 billion, 3.15-mile U-Link extension connecting downtown to Husky Stadium via Broadway. 16 to 18 trucks per day were used to haul dirt away from the site during construction. Sound Transit officials said some 19,900 trucks plied the streets of Capitol Hill hauling muck churned up by the boring machines. Continue reading

With Tacoma expansion set to open, Central Co-op names new CEO

Last winter, Central Co-op marked 40 years on Capitol Hill. This year as spring approaches, the co-op has a new leader.

Catherine Willis Cleveland has been hired as the cooperative’s new CEO.

“Central Co-op is a model for building sustainable communities and a hub for celebrating healthy food,” Cleveland said in a statement. “When I was growing up my mother coordinated a cooperative produce buying club off our front porch and I have carried those cooperative values with me ever since. I am thrilled to be taking this leadership role at Central Co-op and to help guide this community-grown grocer into the future.” Continue reading

Amazon a ‘Go’ on E Pike

(Image: Amazon)

Through dozens of permits and pages of planning updates, CHS has found the first documentation that global retail giant Amazon is, indeed, opening a new cashier-less grocery store on Capitol Hill.

An otherwise innocuous conveyance permit required for elevator work in the AVA Capitol Hill building is the first document filed with the city over the past four years for the 600 E Pike project to include the name “Amazon.”

“No comment,” an Amazon spokesperson offered when CHS confronted the $855 billion and change company with its latest Washington Post-worthy, Watergate-level reporting on the store. Continue reading

On 15th Ave E, booming design business means expansion for Board and Vellum, new start for Capitol Hill nonprofit

In a booming city full of redesign and redevelopment, Capitol Hill design and architecture firm Board and Vellum has decided 15th Ave E is the place for it to grow, too.

“Board and Vellum has grown from a staff of one back in 2011 to just under 40 people today,” firm principal Jeff Pelletier tells CHS. “We have seen tremendous growth in our landscape architecture and interior design studios and being able to occupy the whole building will mean we have certainty of where we will work for years to come while accommodating any future growth in our staff size.”

That growth means Board and Vellum has undertaken two of its most important design projects yet. Continue reading

Seattle passes Mandatory Housing Affordability plan to allow its densest neighborhoods to become even denser

A North Capitol Hill resident made his case against Eastlake upzoning prior to Monday’s vote

Four years and 40 Seattle City Council meetings later, the plan to surgically allow taller and more multifamily-packed development in the city’s densest neighborhoods including Capitol Hill has been approved.

“We’re embracing growth by embracing inclusion,” council member and Mandatory Housing Affordability committee chair Rob Johnson said Monday before the vote. “And we’re embracing inclusion by changing plans that were made 25 years ago.”

The vote Monday ran 9-0.

The MHA plan ties upzones in 27 of the city’s densest neighborhoods to the creation of affordable units and will transition a reported 6% of Seattle’s current single family-zoned property. Continue reading

One dead in 14th/Yesler apartment fire — UPDATE

(Image: Seattle Fire)

CORRECTION: This post has been updated with the correct building identification. CHS initially reported the location of the first address that appeared in the Seattle Fire incident logs but that location was subsequently updated. We apologize for the error.

One person was found dead in a two-alarm apartment fire overnight in a Catholic Housing Services apartment building at 14th and E Yesler.

Seattle Fire was called to the scene around 12:30 AM Monday and found a second story unit in the 1900-built, 34-unit building fully ablaze.

Firefighters quickly brought the fire under control before flames could spread beyond the unit or to the building to the south.

SFD says the blaze was mostly contained to the unit where the body was found. The Medical Examiner was called to the scene and will handle determination of a cause of death and identification of the victim.

Four units in the building were not able to be reoccupied overnight, Seattle Fire said, and Red Cross was requested to assist the victims.

Catholic Housing Services operates the building as part of its homeless, low-income and special needs housing properties. The building has served as housing for the elderly.

Seattle Fire is conducting an investigation into what caused the blaze.

UPDATE: Investigators have ruled the cause of the fire as undetermined pending autopsy results, Seattle Fire says.

Total estimated loss was estimated at $295,000.

Capitol Hill homeowners mount last-ditch effort against MHA upzoning… in Eastlake

The view from Harvard Ave E (Image: CHS)

They know they are probably too late. They know that after a multi-year journey of hearings, community meetings, public comment, and legal challenges, the Seattle City Council wants the Mandatory Housing Affordability (MHA) legislation, which connects affordability mandates to upzoning parts of the city’s densest neighborhoods, to reach its destination during a final vote Monday afternoon. Perhaps they even know Monday’s vote is basically pro forma, as council members have worked on it for years and voted unanimously to advance the legislation last month.

And, yet, a group of North Capitol Hill homeowners, along with the Eastlake Community Council, is trying to fight the upzoning of a seven-block-long (and mostly half a block-deep) sliver of I-5-bordering properties in Eastlake. The amendment for zoning increase, from low-rise to mid-rise with a height limit of 80’ on Boylston Ave. E and a short stretch of Franklin Ave. E was recently introduced and approved by the city council as part of a series of amendments that scaled back upzones across neighborhoods and increased some others. Continue reading

CHS Pics | Seattle Youth Climate Strike — ‘We don’t have any more time to waste’

(Images: Margo Vansynghel for CHS)

Under an early spring sun, hundreds of students and some parents and supporters rallied on Capitol Hill Friday on the turf of the Bobby Morris Playfield for the Seattle Youth Climate Strike.

The students came to Cal Anderson from schools across King County, including Garfield High School, Thornton Creek Elementary School, Nathan Hale and Sammamish High School. They skipped school to demand legislative action on both local and state levels in Washington, adaptation of the Green New Deal to shift to 100% renewable and clean energy, and the declaration of the climate crisis as a national emergency. Continue reading