With sammies and fries, Sunset Fried Chicken makes ‘good partnership’ in Queer/Bar’s kitchen

(Image: Sunset Fried Chicken)

In the beginning, there were no chicken sandwiches on Capitol Hill.

Then there was Ma’ono at the Rhino Room. But that didn’t last long. Then Sunset Fried Chicken sandwiches rose at 12th Ave’s Rachel Ginger Beer. But Ma’ono came back to the Hill and took over that gig. Now, Sunset is back and Queer/Bar is the happy landing spot.

The spicy chicken sliders from Capitol Hill-centered master of the small space Monica Dimas are now taking over the kitchen at Queer/Bar, the 11th Ave gay bar and — now — fried chicken sammie purveyor. Continue reading

After Capitol Hill Block Party 2019, city to ‘assess the viability of this event in this neighborhood’

(Image: Capitol Hill Block Party)

Seattle City Hall is asking the Capitol Hill Block Party to clean up its act on its edges and will be conducting its own round of outreach to neighboring businesses and Pike/Pine residents “in order to better gather feedback on benefits and impacts” from the annual summer music festival “and other major Capitol Hill events,” city officials tell CHS.

Don’t expect there to be any financial mitigation. And there is zero chance the city will cancel permits for the 2019 event. But 2020 — and beyond — is another question.

“It is clear the Capitol Hill Block Party is economically beneficial to some Capitol Hill businesses, and culturally beneficial to the Capitol Hill neighborhood and Seattle,” Chris Swenson, who leads the city’s Special Events planning process, said in a statement sent to CHS. “It is also clear through feedback from Capitol Hill businesses and residents that the Capitol Hill Block Party is negatively economically impactful to other businesses and residents, and presents significant access and operations impacts to neighborhood businesses and residents.”

“The City and Committee take these impacts very seriously,” Swenson added.

For the 2019 Block Party, the city is requiring Block Party producers to make “several physical immediate improvements” including “streamlining access for employees and residents in and around the event perimeter” and “adjusting placement of portapotties and other operational elements to be less impactful to businesses and residents.” It will also require security staffing to be trained “to better support business and residential access.”

But in a message to neighborhood stakeholders sent Thursday, the city says for 2020 and beyond, it plans to consider larger changes to the festival including an effort to “assess the viability of this event in this neighborhood.” Continue reading

With I Love Wasabi roots, Migoto Sushi now open on 12th Ave

(Image: Migoto)

A restaurateur familiar with Capitol Hill’s appetite for sushi has opened a new spot across from Seattle University.

Migoto opened earlier this month with a deep menu of rolls, donburi, noodle soups, and grill specialties. It replaces longtimer Lemongrass, the mid-2000s born Vietnamese joint that managed to hang on even as more modern competition from Ba Bar moved in next door.

The space underwent a modest overhaul and now features a sushi bar setup and cleaned-up exterior. Continue reading

Gay City has expanded E Pike library and resource center — and Three Dollar Bill Cinema as a new roommate

Time to hit the books (Image: Gay City)

Capitol Hill’s Gay City has opened its new library and resource center on E Pike. It also has a new partner in the expanded space.

Gay City, which promotes wellness in Seattle’s LGBTQ community by providing health services, connecting people to needed resources, allowing for artistic expression, and building community, has maintained a growing library for years. The Michael C. Weidemann LGBT Library, at Gay City first opened in 2009, when the nonprofit inherited the LGBT Lending Library from the closing Seattle LGBT Community Center, and now houses more than 8,000 books..

“It’s really about making our existing resources more accessible,” Gay City executive director Fred Swanson said of the opening of the new, larger facility. “More space means more room for people to access services, and more opportunity for programing through the library.” Continue reading

Developers of planned seven-story Belmont Ave E condo project hold community meeting

The city’s new effort to give neighbors an earlier say in shaping neighborhood development is playing out with plans for a seven-story, 34-unit condominium project on Belmont Ave E.

Developer Real Wave Capital and architect Workshop AD have been collecting feedback and will hold a community meeting Thursday night at the Capitol Hill library starting at 4 PM.

“We want to hear from the community about what you want to see at this property,” the developers for the Belmont Z condos write. Continue reading

‘Neighborhood activist’ Murakami, pot entrepreneur Bowers join race for District 3

There are now three challengers for the Seattle City Council District 3 seat held by Kshama Sawant.

And none of them are Kshama Sawant.

Pat Murakami, defeated in her 2017 run against Lorena González for the council’s Position 9 citywide seat, and pot entrepreneur Logan Bowers have joined nonprofit director and entrepreneur Beto Yarce in the race to lead District 3 representing neighborhoods including Capitol Hill, the Central District, First Hill, and, yes, Beacon Hill. Continue reading

Design review: Trading a 1929 Capitol Hill apartment building for a 2019 version on Harvard Ave E

Wednesday night could bring the final design step in the process for a Capitol Hill circa late 2018 trade of necessity — a 1929-built, two-story masonry apartment building with eight units making way for a planned 2019 or so-built, four-story apartment building with 25 “small efficiency dwelling units” and 13 standard apartments.

The development from Hybrid Architecture and the family trust that owns the property is slated to come before the East Design Review Board Wednesday night:

Design review: 740 Harvard Ave E

Parking for 17 vehicles is proposed. And, of course, the existing structure is slated to be demolished. Continue reading

On the List | Final Capitol Hill Art Walk of 2018, Neighbours Alley, Ben’s Bread, Sugar Plum Gary

This Thursday is the last Capitol Hill Art Walk of the year. To get your art fix, pass by the FoodArt Collection and The Factory, or check out the art walk calendar here. In the midst of the art walk, you’ll find the Neighbours Alley Celebration with dumpster painting, ornament making, and, yes, alley bowling. It’s also a big night for seasonal celebration in Volunteer Park at the annual Holiday in the Park event. Find more events around the neighborhood on the CHS Calendar.

THURSDAY, Dec. 13: Contemporary pop artist Genevieve St. Charles might be as consumed by, well, American consumerism as the venerable Andy Warhol was, her work packs a lot more banter. Though she shares a fondness for bananas with Warhol, St. Charles expands her scope to the whole fruit basket (plus deliciously dripping cheese burgers and hot dogs) with a new art show FROOT, featuring shiny peaches and bananas, neon, home furnishings and her famous LaCroix cans with bittersweet flavors such as “Homeless Bitcoin Millionaire” or “Deleted Tinder”. FoodArt Collection, 420 13th Ave E (buzz BUBEN at front door callbox) Apt 101. 5-9 PM Continue reading

Drug and gun charges for man feds say was prolific fake Xanax dealer around Capitol Hill

The haul recovered during searches last week (Image: SPD)

A man investigators say has been dealing marijuana, coke, oxy, and Adderall out of a Capitol Hill apartment for years has been arrested and charged with federal drug crimes after being nailed by Seattle Police detectives working in conjunction with Homeland Security and the King County Sheriff’s Office major crimes unit.

28-year-old Gizachew Degol Wondie was arrested Thursday morning by police at the E Denny Way apartment after an informant tipped off Homeland Security about his activities involving counterfeit Xanax and a King County Sheriff homicide investigation produced the needed search warrants. Continue reading

With OK on long-delayed construction, Elysian set to join Optimism and Redhook in Capitol Hill beer upgrades

(Image: Elysian Brewing)

A long-delayed and pared back overhaul of the grandaddy of Capitol Hill breweries is finally ready to get underway.

The city has finally issued construction permits for an overhaul of Capitol Hill’s Elysian Brewery that will include a refresh of the E Pike pub and beer production facility first planned as an opportunity to better showcase the brewing operation while making much needed equipment upgrades.

Opened in 1996 as Elysian’s original location, the E Pike brewery and brew pub will see a roster of upgrades ranging from an overhaul of the dining area, to bathroom upgrades, and new brewing equipment. The goal in 2016 when CHS talked to the company about the project was to create a “brewing amphitheater.”

A year earlier, Elysian joined what is called the “craft” wing of Anheuser-Busch InBev when they were purchased by the beer giant in 2015. The move that galvanized their share of market in 13 national markets and expanded it to almost all 50 states.

UPDATE 12/13/18: Elysian has announced full details of the work including a planned closure starting December 23rd through spring to get the work done:

Beginning on December 23rd, Elysian Brewing will temporarily close its doors to facilitate a full update to its Capitol Hill location. The brewery is set to debut the refreshed space in Spring 2019, which will feature an overall modernization of the pub, nodding to the Auto Row origins of the brewery’s location, while preserving the Elysian vibe and sentimental aspects of the original layout. Updates will include all-new brewing equipment and increased capacity, as well as the addition of a large garage door which will allow for outdoor patio seating.

Continue reading