Man charged with rape for sex assaults on two teens in Cal Anderson Park

A 60-year-old man has been charged with two counts of child rape after an early morning incident in Cal Anderson Park in which police say he plied two teenagers with drugs before sexually assaulting them both.

Edward Smith was arrested early on the morning of July 4th when police found him outside the tent in the park where the teens said the attacks had occurred. He remains jailed on $250,000 bail. Continue reading

Team behind Altura eyeing new project on Broadway? — UPDATE: Welcome Carrello

(Image: Poppy)

A liquor license application for the north Broadway home of one of the key early chef-driven restaurants in the Capitol Hill food and drink boom appears to involve the team behind the neighborhood’s most ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ of its 💲💲💲 offerings.

According to the application filed Friday and already making the rounds in Seattle’s food and drink social media, Nathan and Rebecca Lockwood have applied for a new liquor license for a project titled Carrello at the address of Poppy, the fresh herb and Thali inspired restaurant from chef Jerry Traunfeld.

Neither the applicants or Traunfeld have yet responded to our inquires around the application. Such filings are common around Capitol Hill when a new owner is preparing to take over an existing venue. The applications must be approved in a process that can take months and not all deals close over issues around money, leases, and more. It’s a hugely sensitive transaction involving people’s lives and their livelihoods and, often, lots of money.

UPDATE 8:15 PM: Sounds like an ambitious project is being born in the process. “Carrello: noun, singular, a small cart usually consisting of two or three trays used for serving food, tea etc.,” the press release starts. Here’s the word on Carrello from the Lockwoods.

  1. Diners will be greeted by numerous carts (carrelli) carrying a wide array of small plates including stuzzichini, antipasti, salumi and seasonal vegetable dishes. These items will be priced individually from three to twelve dollars and guests may choose as many or as few as they wish. A meal could be made of these bites alone. Continue reading

In Seattle’s most expensive race, District 3 challengers powered by Democracy Vouchers

DeWolf and other challengers in D3 are holding gatherings to collect more support like this “a #DemocracyVoucher / Candidate Meet & Greet” gathering at a home on Capitol Hill (Image: Elect DeWolf)

On a long, wood table at Optimism Brewing Company Thursday night sat a makeshift box decked out in pamphlets talking about Zachary DeWolf and his campaign’s purple stickers, which were also being worn by many of the few dozen supporters that ranged from union members from Teamsters 174 and Ironworkers Local 86 to sitting at-large council members Teresa Mosqueda and Lorena González .

“Put your Democracy Vouchers right in here,” Mosqueda implored, holding up the box.

As attendees sipped beers and ate appetizers, González called out the only candidate in the District 3 race not taking part in the Democracy Voucher program: Council member Kshama Sawant .

“Zachary is going to be accountable to this community in this room and in this district,” González said. “You know who he is going to take his words from? It’s not going to be a committee in New York I can tell you that much.”

“The Democracy Voucher program is a beautiful thing,” she added of the measure held up as constitutional by the Washington State Supreme Court (PDF) earlier in the day after being approved by voters at the ballot in 2015.

In the city’s most expensive city council race where loads of PAC cash are coming into play, the Democracy Vouchers are living up to the ultimate test, powering the D3 challengers and creating even stronger reasons for the candidates to get out into the community and meet constituents. Continue reading

Woman dies in Capitol Hill stabbing — UPDATE

A 25-year-old woman died in a stabbing on Capitol Hill early Sunday morning.

Seattle Police has posted a brief on the incident:

Homicide detectives are investigating the fatal stabbing of a 25-year-old female that occurred early Sunday morning at Cal Anderson Park. On Sunday, July 14th at approximately 2:45 am, East Precinct officers were dispatched to report of a stabbing at Cal Anderson Park near East Pine and Nagel Place. Officers arrived and located a 25-year-old female with a stab wound to her chest. Officers performed first aid until they were relieved by Seattle Fire medics. The victim was transported to Harborview Medical Center where she succumbed to her injuries. Homicide detectives responded and assumed responsibility for the follow up investigation. CSI processed the scene. There is no suspect description at this time. This remains an active and on-going investigation. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Seattle Police tip line at (206) 233-5000.

UPDATE 7/15/19: Q13 says family has identified the victim as 25-year-old Rayshauna Webber.

According to East Precinct and Seattle Fire radio reports, the woman was reported stabbed near Cal Anderson and found outside the Rock Box around 2:45 AM. Seattle Police arrived to find the victim on the sidewalk outside the bar at Nagle and Pine. CPR was reportedly underway as confusion at the scene and an extremely busy night for Seattle emergency responders delayed the arrival of units from Seattle Fire.

The victim was transported to Harborview as CPR continued but did not survive, according to East Precinct radio. Continue reading

Pikes/Pines | Sign of Capitol Hill summer: Dragonflies in ankle tattoos — and the air

Eight-spotted Skimmer

One of the things that signal summer to me are dragonflies. One day I look up and suddenly they’re there: jeweled, colorful insects, jetting through the air and changing direction on a dime to scoop up unsuspecting prey. Maybe this isn’t your idea of summer but I think dragonflies are worth your attention this season.

I’ve been feeling a little blue about the state of insects lately (to put it lightly). I am convinced that I belong to a generation with a shifting baseline, unknowingly living through a major decline in insects because I grew up without massive amounts of insects around (see the link above for why this matters). But despite this feeling of dread, I have to remind myself that while some humans have seriously destructive and potentially irreversible tendencies, many insects have been around a long, long time too.  Continue reading

Police shut down MAGA ‘free hugs’ after Pike/Pine disturbance

Police convinced two men reportedly causing a disturbance near 10th and Pike outside the Comet Tavern to move along Friday night.

Earlier in the evening, there were multiple reports of two men wearing Donald Trump’s “Make America Great Again” hats and carrying a poster advertising “free hugs” attempting to interview and make video recordings of E Pike passersby. Continue reading

CHS Pics | YWCA celebrates 125 years in Washington, a century in the Central District

With a party in Powell Barnett Park Thursday night, the YWCA held a community gathering to celebrate its long history in the Central District as part of a greater celebration marking 125 years since the organization first established a location in the state when it opened a small storeroom with a cafeteria and a lounge in Seattle at 3rd and Columbia. Continue reading

City rolling out delayed changes on Broadway to speed up streetcar

Fuchsia Streetcar

Bowing to local business pressure — and what it predicts will be a radically transformed transportation corridor thanks to the  $120 million, 2.3-mile Madison Bus Rapid Transit project — the Seattle Department of Transportation has updated its long-delayed plans for improvements to the First Hill Streetcar following pushback business owners and Mayor Jenny Durkan’s office. Despite complaints about the elimination of left-turns and the addition of red paint for a transit-only lane, SDOT still plans to alter traffic signals and implement a transit-only lane — eventually.

“Complex intersections where other vehicles might be making a left turn or otherwise blocking the intersection slows down the streetcar,” SDOT representative Ethan Bergerson said.

Last year, CHS reported on SDOT’s plans for potential changes to the First Hill Streetcar route to make the streets more efficient for the rail transit and, hopefully, boost ridership. But Capitol Hill businesses — led by the now-disolved Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce — and the mayor’s office pushed back on the proposals and the project has been stuck in neutral since.

SDOT officials say the department has since made changes to traffic signals and turns on Yesler in an effort to speed up that section of the First Hill Streetcar. Adjustments included restricting left turning vehicles from east and westbound directions during peak afternoon traffic times at Yesler and Boren, restricting left turning vehicles at Yesler and 12th, and synchronizing traffic signals at Yester and 14th.

Officials say SDOT now plans to make similar adjustments to the Broadway section of the streetcar, implementing changes as soon as this fall.  Continue reading

Capitol Hill slept through an early morning Seattle earthquake

A 4.6 magnitude earthquake rumbled from near Monroe early Friday morning, shaking buildings to the southwest around Seattle while most of Capitol Hill slept through the ride.

There were no reports of significant damage or injuries from the 2:51 AM quake or smaller aftershocks that followed but it did rattle and roll enough for a few people to get out of bed — or, at least, roll over, grab their phones, and update social media.

USGS Community Internet Intensity Map

The US Geological Survey’s mapping of reports from around the area showed that the quake was felts as far away as Olympia.

KIRO reports the quake is the largest to hit the region since the 6.8 M 2001 Nisqually earthquake.

While Seattle is still largely unprepared for the “big one,” the city does know more about how much it would cost to retrofit its thousands of unreinforced masonry buildings. A new plan, meanwhile, will test a solar microgrid system at Capitol Hill’s Miller Community Center that is designed to give the facility greater resiliency in the event of natural disasters.