180 Polyclinic employees moving ‘Capitol Hill’ style — 2 blocks from E Pike to Broadway

Talk to a Capitol Hill veteran and you’re likely to find somebody who has moved everything they’ve owned, box by box, down the hallway, down the street or down the block. Turns out, even giant health providers make the classic two-block Capitol Hill move. A new Polyclinic building on First Hill means 180 of the health care provider’s employees are leaving E Pike — and are being moved down the street and around the corner to Broadway. The moving trucks began the work this weekend.


A company spokesperson says about one third of the employees will be moved from the 1016 E Pike building the Polyclinic has been leasing for office space this weekend, with the second third moving out the following weekend and the final third making the transition to the Polyclinic Broadway facility after that.

Officials say the move is a consolidation made possible by the opening of the new Polyclinic facility at 7th and Madison. The transition of care services to the western edge of First Hill opened up the clinic’s Broadway building for office space making the E Pike lease superfluous. 

CHS has no details if the Bellevue real estate investor who owns the 22,000 square-foot building has new tenants lined up. The Polyclinic functions handled on E Pike included dealing with payments — hence the unusual level of security and seriousness around the entrance in the middle of a street mostly focused on having a good time.

As for the former Complete Automotive building at Union and Broadway purchased by the Polyclinic as potential insurance against their First Hill plans falling through, the company spokesperson said it hasn’t ben determined what will become of the property. “We’re looking at it,” she said. In 2010, CHS reported that the 7th/Madison deal likely meant a long period of limbo for the Union/Broadway property.

5 thoughts on “180 Polyclinic employees moving ‘Capitol Hill’ style — 2 blocks from E Pike to Broadway

  1. “Talk to a Capitol Hill veteran and you’re likely to find somebody who has moved everything they’ve owned, box by box, down the hallway, down the street or down the block.”

    Unfortunately for Capitol Hill residents, every time you move in a similar manner, as life on Capitol Hill is a perpetual jockeying for a better situation, your credit rating goes downhill. It’s so completely arbitrary, unfair, discriminatory. It needs leadership from the Washington delegation.

  2. Obviously, this doesn’t have anything to do with HOW you move. It has to do with how often you move. It’s not particularly shocking that people who move very frequently tend to have lower credit scores, because they’re less stable. That doesn’t mean it’s true for everybody, but credit scoring is based on averages. Not sure why you think this is unfair, but it seems intuitively obvious.

    Even so, all you have to do is pay your bills consistently, and it won’t be a problem. I moved frequently in my 20s, and I didn’t make a lot of money, but it never hurt me any.