On the List | Bat ‘n’ Rouge, Jockstraps and Glitter, Capitol Hill Block Party and Off Block Party

IMG_9577The Capitol Hill Block Party revs up on Friday afternoon and runs through Sunday evening in the Pike/Pine core. You can hate the insanity or love — but you should definitely respect the one-of-a-kind, three-day music fest. Not a fan? CHBP is definitely not the only thing happening this weekend on Capitol Hill.

Just a block over from Block Party, queer athletes and their biggest fans will take over Bobby Morris field at Cal Anderson Park for two days of action.

Sunday brings a bumped-up on the calendar edition of the annual Bat ‘n’ Rouge softball game pitting Dykes vs. Drag Queens in a battle royale on the diamond. The fun starts at 1 PM. Bring cash to bribe the umpire!

jockstraps and glitterSaturday, the costumed fundraiser-kickball game Jockstraps and Glitter returns to Cal Anderson Park for a “ribald, and REVEALING afternoon hosted by DonnaTella Howe on the bullhorn to keep things going. Watch us run, kick, catch, and tumble with the rugby boys, who’ll do ANYTHING for a buck.”

Thursday, you can check out the videOasis quarterly showcase which brings “the best new PNW music videos out of the Internet ether and throws them big on the silver screen, with musicians and directors in attendance to spill the goods on the process of collaboration.” Prefunc in the bar at Northwest Film Forum with free tequila tasting starting at 7pm.

Art Deco Japan film Lady and the Beard screens Friday night at Volunteer Park Amphitheater at 8:30. This 1931 silent film will be accompanied by a live musical score performance. See our write up here on five weeks of outdoor film screenings this summer on the Hill. 

Participants in Velocity Dance Center’s Strictly Seattle – an intensive 3-week immersion into the Seattle dance scene – bring their culminating performances to Broadway Performance Hall. See super-charged new works by zoe | juniper, Pat Graney, Bennyroyce Royon, Jody Kuehner, Shannon Stewart, Rosa Vissers + Bryon Carr created during the three-week Strictly Seattle Summer Dance Intensive + New shorts from KT Niehoff’s Dance Film Track Friday (evening) or Saturday (matinee and evening).

Vermillion has organized three days of Off Block Party events, which include live music, dj dance party, and a BBQ.They’re located outside of the CHBP fence and all events are free.

In the CD, Outdoor Trek continues at Blanche Lavizzo Park and on 15th Ave E Friday, you’ll find a Nuflours gluten free bakery pop-up.

Something to add? Let us know on the CHS Calendar — more listings below:

Oct
19
Sat
RealSelf House of Modern Beauty: A Pop-Up Beauty Event @ The Riveter - Fremont
Oct 19 @ 10:00 AM – Oct 20 @ 5:00 PM

At RealSelf.com, we demystify cosmetic treatments and procedures so you can make smart and confident beauty decisions. In celebration of this mission, we launched the RealSelf House of Modern Beauty—an interactive pop-up event where guests can explore the world of medical aesthetics and discover the latest beauty treatments.

On Saturday, Oct. 19 and Sunday, Oct. 20, RealSelf will transform an office building in Seattle’s Fremont neighborhood into the House of Modern Beauty—a medical spa, beauty pop-up, and interactive event all-in-one. 

The two-day event will feature complimentary cosmetic treatments like microneedling, laser hair removal, and nonsurgical muscle toning, as well as visual installations (perfect for Instagram), and expert-led panel discussions featuring local media and entrepreneurs. 

Entry is free, ages 18+.

Learn more about RealSelf.com and the Seattle House of Modern Beauty at https://houseofmodernbeauty.realself.com/

RealSelf Media Contact: Madison Phillips, madison@realself.com

Oct
20
Sun
Darkwave Yoga @ Ritual @ Ritual
Oct 20 @ 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Come practice gothy, slow-flow vinyasa to the musical stylings of dark wave bands like Joy Division, Black Tape for a Blue Girl, and Depeche Mode in the weird and lovely Ritual space on Pike Street. This is a free karma class meant for all friends and neighbors on the Hill, taught by one of the Ritual owners, a certified vinyasa instructor, and all attendees enjoy a 15% discount if they stay and shop after class.

Rebel Saints Meditation Society-Meditation-Kindness/Forgiveness/Compassion/Equanimity/ @ Rebel Saints Meditation Society
Oct 20 @ 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Capitol Hill Meditation Sit/Class on with Rebel Saints Meditation Society.

Sunday Morning10:30 AM to Noon

Learn how to use the practice of meditation to become more kind, more compassionate and more forgiving towards yourself, towards others and towards the world.

30 minute guided meditation-talk-discussion

We are located at 1423 10th Ave Studio 9 in the Pike/Pine corridor of our beloved Capitol Hill Neighborhood.

We are easily accessible by all public transportation with the light rail station three blocks from our door…

You will find us by walking down the ramp and entering thru the red door..

Capitol Hill Farmers Market @ Capitol Hill Farmers Market
Oct 20 @ 11:00 AM – 3:00 PM
Capitol Hill Farmers Market @ Capitol Hill Farmers Market | Seattle | Washington | United States

The Capitol Hill Broadway Farmers Market supports Washington’s small family farmers by creating a vibrant neighborhood farmers market.  Located outside the Seattle Central Community College, the Market runs year-round every Sunday from 11am-3pm, and has been in operation since 2005.  One can find fresh Washington grown produce, fruit and flowers, meat and cheese, seafood and eggs, bread and grains, dairy products and hot prepared food, live music and cooking demonstrations, and that’s just the start! We are happy to accept EBT, and can answer any of your questions at the Market Manager booth.  Join us!

Donald Byrd: The America That Is To Be @ Frye Art Museum
Oct 20 @ 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Jeffrey S. Kane. Donald Byrd, 1989. Photograph. Courtesy of Jeffrey S. Kane.

Seattle-based choreographer Donald Byrd works at the forefront of contemporary performance. For four decades, he has created innovative and startling dance theater works that explore the extraordinary capacities of dancers’ bodies, the complexities of Africanist aesthetics, and the ways that theatrical dance can open audiences toward social change. Presenting selected works from across his prodigious career, Byrd’s first solo museum exhibition reflects Americans’ ongoing struggles to care for our complex diversity. The show centers the artist’s firm belief in an America that is to be: one that is “multi-racial in every aspect.” For Byrd, the future of performance will include “a full spectrum of who lives in America on the stage…a reflection of our world.”

More than any other statesman of contemporary dance, Byrd concerns himself with the terms of social encounters that produce racialized and gendered subjects. His works test suppositions: he wonders on public stages about the conditions of gender and misogyny, race relations, eternal warfare, sexual identity, and the price of obsession. Working across multiple genres—in Hollywood, on Broadway, in opera, and with major ballet and modern dance companies—Byrd always moves toward the most difficult questions, boldly, forcefully, and thoughtfully. In so doing, he presses us all to understand the potential of dance as an act of defiance, as a demonstration of expertise, and as a meditation on what else could be.

The America That Is To Be incorporates archival performance footage and ephemera from various stages of Byrd’s forty-plus years of creativity with in-gallery dance performances. The exhibition traces his beginnings at California Institute of Arts, where his dance work took on a punk-inspired aesthetic, to his early works with his first dance company Donald Byrd/The Group (active from 1978–2002), through crucial collaborations with groups including the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, and his work since 2002 as Artistic Director of Seattle’s Spectrum Dance Theater. Reflecting the way Byrd’s vision has evolved into its full expression across a remarkable array of dance-theater works, The America That Is To Be demonstrates the passionate affirmation of a mature artist’s belief in dance to inspire social transformations; to dance toward social justice.

Donald Byrd (American, b. 1949, New London, North Carolina) is a Tony-nominated (The Color Purple) and Bessie Award-winning (The Minstrel Show) choreographer. He has been the Artistic Director of Spectrum Dance Theater in Seattle since December 2002. Formerly, he was Artistic Director of Donald Byrd/The Group, a critically acclaimed contemporary dance company, founded in Los Angeles and later based in New York, that toured both nationally and internationally. He has created dance works for many leading companies including Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Pacific Northwest Ballet, The Joffrey Ballet, and Dance Theater of Harlem, among others, and worked extensively in theater and opera.

His many awards, prizes, and fellowships include Honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts, Cornish College of the Arts; Masters of Choreography Award, The Kennedy Center; Fellow at The American Academy of Jerusalem; James Baldwin Fellow of United States Artists; Resident Fellow of The Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center; Fellow at the Institute on the Arts and Civic Dialogue, Harvard University; and the Mayor’s Arts Award for his sustained contributions to the City of Seattle.

Donald Byrd received the 2016 James W. Ray Distinguished Artist Award, which is funded by the Raynier Institute & Foundation through the Frye Art Museum | Artist Trust Consortium. The award supports and advances the creative work of outstanding artists living and working in Washington State and culminates in a presentation at the Frye Art Museum.

Donald Byrd: The America That Is To Be is organized by Frye Art Museum and curated by Thomas F. DeFrantz, Professor of Dance, Duke University. Lead support for this exhibition is provided by the Raynier Institute & Foundation through the Frye Art Museum | Artist Trust Consortium. Additional generous support is provided by Graham Construction. Media sponsorship is provided by Encore Media Group.

Dress Codes: Ellen Lesperance and Diane Simpson @ Frye Art Museum
Oct 20 @ 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Diane Simpson. Window Dressing: Background 6, Collar and Bib-deco, 2007/08. Foam board, linoleum, wood, aluminum, enamel, and spun-bond polyester. 96 x 120 x 16 in. Courtesy of the artist; Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago; JTT, New York; and Herald St., London.

Clothing is both a highly personal and socially constructed system of communication: a signifying point of contact between individual identities and collective attitudes, customs, and trends. Dress Codes brings together the work of two artists who perform acts of translation in relation to clothing’s form and ornamentation, pressing images of historical garments—and the values encoded within them—through the interpretive interface of the grid. Though they begin from different types of source material and seek divergent ends, Ellen Lesperance and Diane Simpson both employ the gridded instructional diagram as a means for transformation across time and dimension. In the process, they return the grid, an idealized format associated with Modernist abstraction, to the practical ethos of the applied arts and domestic craft, connecting the everyday language of dress to wide-ranging cultural and political histories.

Lesperance creates gouache paintings based on the attire of women activists using American Symbolcraft, the visual shorthand of knitting patterns, in which the color of each stitch is shown as a single cell within the matrix of specialized graph paper. Working from footage and photographs of protest movements—most notably the Greenham Common Peace Camp that mounted anti-nuclear-armament demonstrations in Berkshire, UK from 1981 to 2000—the artist carefully translates activists’ (often homemade) clothing into the flattened space of hand-ruled paper, extrapolating to fill in areas that are invisible within the source images. The paintings function as standalone artworks and also as directions for re-making the pictured garments, as homage to the original wearers, a record of their ideological symbology, and stimulus to likeminded action in the present.

Simpson’s sculptural work begins with illustrations found in antique clothing catalogues, window dressing manuals, and histories of dress. Submitting pliable articles like collars, cuffs, aprons, and bonnets to the rigid constraints of a two-dimensional diagram—modeled on axonometric projection employed in architectural drawings, which integrates multiple viewpoints into a single image—the artist renders their forms in a foreshortened perspective that she then maintains when constructing three-dimensional versions. The resulting angular distortions—coupled with dramatic shifts in scale and materiality—both estrange and magnify the garments’ relationship to the body, underscoring their sociological significance as imposed expressions of gender norms, class status, and morality.

Through the process of encoding structure into schematics, both Lesperance and Simpson transform their source material into something new, embedding their own perspective in translations of the past. Dress Codes brings their work into conversation for the first time, highlighting their body- and craft-adjacent use of the grid as a feminist alternative to patriarchal representational traditions of painting and sculpture.

Ellen Lesperance (American, b. 1971, Minneapolis, Minnesota) lives and works in Portland, Oregon. Her work has been exhibited nationally at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York; The New Museum, New York; the Portland Art Museum, Oregon; the Drawing Center, New York; and Seattle Art Museum, Washington and internationally at the Bonniers Konsthall, Stockholm and the Tate St. Ives, England. She has received grants and awards from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, Art Matters, Pollock-Krasner Foundation and the Ford Family Foundation.

Diane Simpson (American, b. 1935, Joliet, Illinois) lives and works in Chicago. Recent one and two-person exhibitions of her work have been held at Herald Street, London; Corbett vs Dempsey, Chicago; JTT, New York; NYU Broadway Windows, New York; Silberkuppe, Berlin; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; and Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. She has exhibited in numerous group exhibitions, including The Jewish Museum, New York; The Hessel Museum at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y.; the Art Institute of Chicago; White Columns, New York; and CCA Wattis Institute, San Francisco, and will participate in the 2019 Whitney Biennial.

Dress Codes: Ellen Lesperance and Diane Simpson is organized by the Frye Art Museum and curated by Amanda Donnan. Media sponsorship provided by Crosscut.

Frame of Mind: Storytelling Through Animation @ Frye Art Museum
Oct 20 @ 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Image: Madeline Courant Rathbun

A Partnership for Youth exhibition, Frame of Mind: Storytelling Through Animationshowcases the results of an eight-week workshop for teens led by teaching artists from Reel Grrls, during which students develop, animate, and edit their own stop-motion film projects.

Halloween Pet Parade in Volunteer Park @ Volunteer Park
Oct 20 @ 11:00 AM – 2:00 PM

Join us for a festive celebration of our furry friends!  This delightful parade will feature pets in costumes, food trucks, prizes, and 20 vendor booths.

Click here to register your pet!

Like, share and RSVP on our Facebook event page.

Food Trucks

The following food trucks will be on hand for a little snack!

Nonprofits

The following nonprofit groups will also be on hand:

Julie Austin Photography will be offering FREE digital photos of your pets!

And more!  See our website event page for updated info.

THANK YOU!

Thank you to our Event Sponsor: MUD BAY

Thanks also to our Ask the Vet sponsor Jet City Animal Clinic.

And a special thank you to our sponsoring Community Partners:  Kaiser Permanente, Aegis Living on Madison and 4Culture.

 

Italy From Hat To Boot Wine Tasting @ Madrona Wine Merchants
Oct 20 @ 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM

From Alto Adage in the north to Sicily in the south, we are on an Italian adventure this Sunday. Stop by for a taste of these Sunday Sippers.

2016 Castel Sallegg Sauvignon  $12
From Alto Adage — Classic and direct Italian Sauvignon Blanc.  Aromas of grapefruit, peach, freshly cut grass, tomato leaves and nettles. It is moderately heavy, juicy and fresh on the palate with a pleasant mellowness and a good length.  Was $18 now $12

2015 Alcesti Admeto  $15
Syrah
This Sicilian Syrah has a rich and mellow bouquet and notes of wild berries in perfect harmony with spicy hints of black pepper and balsamic notes. It has a generous flavor, with a pleasant tannic, velvety and persistent sensation.

Madrona Wine Merchants offers free wine tastings featuring 4-5 selections on a theme every Saturday from 2 until the bottles run out and on Sunday, we offer a mini-tasting of two wines all day from 11-5.

Pierre Leguillon: Arbus Bonus @ Frye Art Museum
Oct 20 @ 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Pierre Leguillon. Installation views of Arbus Bonus, 2014. 256 framed magazine pages, pile of vintage magazines, 11 crates, captions. Dimensions variable. Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh: The Henry L. Hillman Fund, 2014.13.1-.269. Photo: Bryan Conley.

Pierre Leguillon’s artwork-as-exhibition Arbus Bonus calls attention to the major role famed twentieth-century photographer Diane Arbus’s work has played in defining the image of American postwar popular culture. Bringing together every published magazine spread that features her photography, Leguillon’s project considers the ways in which cultural histories are assembled and disseminated, and proposes more inclusive counter-narratives.

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