On the List | 12th Ave Arts, Donum sale at The Project Room, comics at the library, BAIT Seattle opening, Lobby’s last night

Capitol Hill’s big upcoming event is Thursday afternoon as the theater-powered mixed-use development 12th Ave Arts celebrates its grand opening.

Also this weekend, six local artists will come together in support of Capitol Hill’s The Project Room to host a two day sale event. Donum: a Sale of Contemporary Art and Fashion will take place on November 21 and 22nd from 1 to 7 PM. The artists will display and sell their works — 25% of their proceeds will in fact go to support The Project Room.

Born three years ago, E Pine’s The Project Room provides grant and giving-powered art programs to the public in an effort to maintain a free flow of art and creativity in the city. The organization has been holding workshops and various art events and presentations since its opening. “We are trying to raise money for The Project Room, support these artists and connect to new audiences,” Britt Rynearson, planner for the show and a Project Room board member, told CHS.

Donum is an annual sale which brings local artists together in an effort to promote art and raise money for a local charity. Last year the show raised money for Coyote Central which is an organization that provides art programs in the Central District.

“Each person involved is very established and they work full-time as a designer and they are all local,” Rynearson said. The featured artists for this event are Dawn Smithson, Mia Fioravanti, Tia Kramer, Lynda Sherman and Elena Korakianitou as well as Rynearson. The event will kickstart on November 20 with a V.I.P. party. The party will feature all six of the local artists, major donors and special client of the artists.

There will be variety of items like scarves and clothings, handbags, jewellery, handmade cards and a lot more. Items are priced from $20 to $1000. Rynearson herself will be displaying permanently pleated scarves and shawls.

Audiences will also be treated to a live performance by opera singer Janna Wachter at 6 PM on both days.

More information about this event can be found at projectroomseattle.org.

More things to do around Capitol Hill and nearby are below. Something to add? Let us know on the CHS Calendar.

Sep
23
Mon
Noon Yoga Every Weekday at The SweatBox @ The SweatBox Yoga
Sep 23 @ 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Now you can drop into a class at The SweatBox every weekday at noon.

Monday-Vinyasa; Tuesday-Hot Hybrid; Wednesday- Yin; Thursday- Hot Hybrid; Friday- Vinyasa!

noontime-yoga

German-language Talk: Democracy in Germany, 30 Years after the Mauerfall @ Goethe Pop Up Seattle
Sep 23 @ 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM

PLEASE NOTE: TALK & DISCUSSION WILL BE HELD IN GERMAN.

Prof. Dr. Karl-Rudolf Korte, who is visiting the Goethe Pop Up Seattle from Germany, will discuss his recent publication Gesichter der Macht, a study of the role of the federal president, and the elections in the federal states of Brandenburg, Thuringia, and Saxony. He is joined in conversation by Prof. Niko Switek.

At the center of the talk stands the following question: How does democracy narrate itself? The federal president disposes of an enormous potential for political creative power – apart from formal arrangements and decrees. Especially today, when in terms of elite, cosmopolitan liberalism on the one hand and new radical, national authoritarianism on the other powerful stories of minimal consensus of our democracy must be told. What story will be told this fall in Germany if the elections in Brandenburg, Saxony, and Thuringia will strengthen the AfD?

About the speakers:

Prof. Dr. Karl-Rudolf Korte received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Mainz in 1988 and his Dr. rer. pol. habil. from the Ludwig Maximillian University Munich. Korte has been teaching at the University Duisburg-Essen since 2003. He has been holding the position of director of the NRW School of Governance since 2006. For almost 20 years, he has also been accompanying the televised election shows of ZDF as election researcher. His recent monograph, Gesichter der MachtÜber die Gestaltungspotentiale der BundespräsidentenEin Essay was published in 2019.

Niko Switek currently holds a DAAD Visiting Assistant Professorship for German Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School for International Studies and the Department of Political Science at the University of Washington, Seattle.

Seattle Arts & Lectures Literary Arts Series: Malcolm Gladwell @ Benaroya Hall — S. Mark Taper Foundation Auditorium
Sep 23 @ 7:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Seattle Arts & Lectures Literary Arts Series: Malcolm Gladwell @ Benaroya Hall — S. Mark Taper Foundation Auditorium

Malcolm Gladwell is a writer, public speaker, and podcast host whose work deals with the unexpected implications of research in the social sciences. Gladwell’s latest, Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about People We Don’t Know (September 2019), is a challenging and controversial excursion through history, psychology, and scandals taken straight from the news.

Free Trivia Night @ Poco Wine + Spirits
Sep 23 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Free Trivia Night @ Poco Wine + Spirits

Join us for your weekly dose of brainy drinking.
– Max team size of 6.
– Winning team takes home a $40 gift card!

Sep
24
Tue
Slow Flow in The SweatBox Loft @ The SweatBox Loft
Sep 24 @ 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM
Slow Flow in The SweatBox Loft @ The SweatBox Loft

Find the softer side of your flow practice with Slow Flow in The SweatBox Loft. In Slow Flow, we’ll intentionally weave together traditional postures. This class will be unheated and very beginner friendly (aka- no Chaturangas!) Slow your practice down and build your alignment, balance, and focus. Come and expand your strength and flexibility- physically AND mentally. Appropriate for all levels. 80 degrees. This class takes place in The SweatBox Loft and pre-registration is encouraged. Please pre- register and use code 9642 and follow signs to get to The SweatBox Loft space for this class.

Dress Codes: Ellen Lesperance and Diane Simpson @ Frye Art Museum
Sep 24 @ 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Diane Simpson. Window Dressing: Background 6, Collar and Bib-deco, 2007/08. Foam board, linoleum, wood, aluminum, enamel, and spun-bond polyester. 96 x 120 x 16 in. Courtesy of the artist; Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago; JTT, New York; and Herald St., London.

Clothing is both a highly personal and socially constructed system of communication: a signifying point of contact between individual identities and collective attitudes, customs, and trends. Dress Codes brings together the work of two artists who perform acts of translation in relation to clothing’s form and ornamentation, pressing images of historical garments—and the values encoded within them—through the interpretive interface of the grid. Though they begin from different types of source material and seek divergent ends, Ellen Lesperance and Diane Simpson both employ the gridded instructional diagram as a means for transformation across time and dimension. In the process, they return the grid, an idealized format associated with Modernist abstraction, to the practical ethos of the applied arts and domestic craft, connecting the everyday language of dress to wide-ranging cultural and political histories.

Lesperance creates gouache paintings based on the attire of women activists using American Symbolcraft, the visual shorthand of knitting patterns, in which the color of each stitch is shown as a single cell within the matrix of specialized graph paper. Working from footage and photographs of protest movements—most notably the Greenham Common Peace Camp that mounted anti-nuclear-armament demonstrations in Berkshire, UK from 1981 to 2000—the artist carefully translates activists’ (often homemade) clothing into the flattened space of hand-ruled paper, extrapolating to fill in areas that are invisible within the source images. The paintings function as standalone artworks and also as directions for re-making the pictured garments, as homage to the original wearers, a record of their ideological symbology, and stimulus to likeminded action in the present.

Simpson’s sculptural work begins with illustrations found in antique clothing catalogues, window dressing manuals, and histories of dress. Submitting pliable articles like collars, cuffs, aprons, and bonnets to the rigid constraints of a two-dimensional diagram—modeled on axonometric projection employed in architectural drawings, which integrates multiple viewpoints into a single image—the artist renders their forms in a foreshortened perspective that she then maintains when constructing three-dimensional versions. The resulting angular distortions—coupled with dramatic shifts in scale and materiality—both estrange and magnify the garments’ relationship to the body, underscoring their sociological significance as imposed expressions of gender norms, class status, and morality.

Through the process of encoding structure into schematics, both Lesperance and Simpson transform their source material into something new, embedding their own perspective in translations of the past. Dress Codes brings their work into conversation for the first time, highlighting their body- and craft-adjacent use of the grid as a feminist alternative to patriarchal representational traditions of painting and sculpture.

Ellen Lesperance (American, b. 1971, Minneapolis, Minnesota) lives and works in Portland, Oregon. Her work has been exhibited nationally at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York; The New Museum, New York; the Portland Art Museum, Oregon; the Drawing Center, New York; and Seattle Art Museum, Washington and internationally at the Bonniers Konsthall, Stockholm and the Tate St. Ives, England. She has received grants and awards from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, Art Matters, Pollock-Krasner Foundation and the Ford Family Foundation.

Diane Simpson (American, b. 1935, Joliet, Illinois) lives and works in Chicago. Recent one and two-person exhibitions of her work have been held at Herald Street, London; Corbett vs Dempsey, Chicago; JTT, New York; NYU Broadway Windows, New York; Silberkuppe, Berlin; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; and Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. She has exhibited in numerous group exhibitions, including The Jewish Museum, New York; The Hessel Museum at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y.; the Art Institute of Chicago; White Columns, New York; and CCA Wattis Institute, San Francisco, and will participate in the 2019 Whitney Biennial.

Dress Codes: Ellen Lesperance and Diane Simpson is organized by the Frye Art Museum and curated by Amanda Donnan. Media sponsorship provided by Crosscut.

End of Day: American Oil Painting Around 1900 @ Frye Art Museum
Sep 24 @ 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM

John Henry Twachtman. Dunes Back of Coney Island, ca. 1880. Oil on canvas. 13 7/8 x 19 7/8 in. Frye Art Museum, 1956.010.

End of Day presents a selection of portrait and landscape paintings by American artists from the Frye Art Museum’s permanent collection. Spanning the period between the Civil War and First World War, the images oscillate between an embrace of progress and a sense of nostalgia for what was perceived to be a simpler American era.

Frame of Mind: Storytelling Through Animation @ Frye Art Museum
Sep 24 @ 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Image: Madeline Courant Rathbun

A Partnership for Youth exhibition, Frame of Mind: Storytelling Through Animationshowcases the results of an eight-week workshop for teens led by teaching artists from Reel Grrls, during which students develop, animate, and edit their own stop-motion film projects.

Pierre Leguillon: Arbus Bonus @ Frye Art Museum
Sep 24 @ 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Pierre Leguillon. Installation views of Arbus Bonus, 2014. 256 framed magazine pages, pile of vintage magazines, 11 crates, captions. Dimensions variable. Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh: The Henry L. Hillman Fund, 2014.13.1-.269. Photo: Bryan Conley.

Pierre Leguillon’s artwork-as-exhibition Arbus Bonus calls attention to the major role famed twentieth-century photographer Diane Arbus’s work has played in defining the image of American postwar popular culture. Bringing together every published magazine spread that features her photography, Leguillon’s project considers the ways in which cultural histories are assembled and disseminated, and proposes more inclusive counter-narratives.

Recent Acquisitions: Toyin Ojih Odutola @ Frye Art Museum
Sep 24 @ 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Toyin Ojih Odutola. Birmingham (left, center, right), 2014. Four-color lithograph with gold leaf. 24 x 16 ½ in. each. Frye Art Museum, Purchased with funds provided by Seattle Art Fair, additional funds provided by Frye Art Museum Director’s Discretionary Fund, 2018.007.01-.03

Toyin Ojih Odutola’s drawings, paintings, and prints question physical and sociopolitical identities as they pertain to skin color. This suite of three lithographs, recently acquired for the Frye Art Museum’s collection, demonstrates Odutola’s signature approach to portraiture, in which the sitter is seen obliquely or from multiple, unusual angles within one composition.

This entry was posted in News, etc. by Sumedha Majumdar. Bookmark the permalink.

About Sumedha Majumdar

I am an aspiring journalist. I am currently a Journalism major attending school in Seattle University. I am graduating in the Spring. Writing and photography is a hobby and I want to turn them into a lifestyle. I am originally from India and I moved to Seattle back in 2004. My full-time job is in Safeway and I have been there for over ten years. I have always wanted to go into Journalism and have worked in a couple of school newspapers in the past. I have always wanted to cover serious issues and arts and entertainment. I am so looking forward to my internship in CHS and I know that I will be able to learn a lot.
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