After 15 years, Metro Clothing is closing but won’t leave another hole in Broadway retail

Changing neighborhood dynamics and shifting fashion styles have conspired to end Metro Clothing’s 15-year run of selling alternative and goth clothes on Capitol Hill.

Last week, owner Angel Theurer began putting up signs announcing a liquidation sale in order to bring on new line of spring clothing. But Theurer and Metro founder Carl Medeiros have now decided to close Metro and start fresh with a new clothing store in the same space.

“A lot more New York influenced, edgy but not gothic, and definitely low price points,” is how Medieros described the new direction he wants to take. Medieros said the new offerings will be a higher-end complement to Panache, his clothing shop next door.

Metro will continue to liquidate everything in the store through April, when Medieros hopes to close up for a few days, then open the new yet-to-be-named shop.

Originally located on E Pike, Metro moved to its current location at Broadway and Thomas in 1998. At the time, Medeiros said it was a good move for the business. It was also a better time for goth-influenced clothing that customers were

These days, the long time Capitol Hill shoe and clothing seller said Capitol Hill’s younger residents aren’t willing to shell out hundreds of dollars on new club clothes and the clothes they’re buying aren’t what they used to be.

“The goth and alt scene have declined, theres’s (just) a percentage that continues to support us,” he said. “The clientele just isn’t around any more, they’re not spending the money they did.

More recently, Medeiros has been frustrated with the construction along Broadway for the new Capitol Hill light rail station and the perceived wall its created between Pike/Pine and Broadway.

“I think we can ride it though until Sound Transit is done,” he said. “If they have a delay for another year, it’s going to be more stores closing.”

The quick swap in the Metro space is just the latest fashion change on Broadway. Vintage clothing purveyor Red Light announced it was closing in December, quickly followed by Lifelong Thrift’s announcement that it would take over the space. Lifelong, by the way, is holding a fundraiser to help defray unexpected expenses in its move from E Union to Broadway.

Meanwhile, a hunt is on for a new tenant to fill the relatively massive space about to be left behind by OfficeMax’s exit from Broadway.

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6 thoughts on “After 15 years, Metro Clothing is closing but won’t leave another hole in Broadway retail

  1. I have always wondered how Metro and Panache have stayed open. Metro, perhaps by it’s niche market, but Panache? I’ve never seen a soul go in or out of there. Curious….

  2. Ugh, that full of suck. I always have enjoyed shopping at the Metro, just don’t have the cash like I use to.

  3. ” “The goth and alt scene have declined, theres’s (just) a percentage that continues to support us,” he said. “The clientele just isn’t around any more, they’re not spending the money they did.” ”

    Um, that’s bs. If either Carl or Angel participated in the scene in any way other than to attempt to wring money out of it, they would know the goth scene is thriving here. Clothing trends and styles come and go within the goth scene itself, and if Metro had any idea what was cool maybe people would shop there. Instead, a shop full of tired five seasons old Shrine clothing sadly collects dust.

  4. There is indeed a thriving vibrant, beautiful goth scene here but the way I was treated when I went into Metro assured I wouldn’t be back. There are far too many amazing, nice, thankful local artists my clothing funds can go to. I also had never seen a store so out of touch when trying to sell to a scene, it was more like an attempt, or costume store, I found it more than a little insulting. I believe after an employee had offended me the owner or manager tried to help & I did buy one thing because that I did want to support, her help & she was nice, but I never returned.