New Spacefinder helps *find* *space* for arts… and more around Capitol Hill (Plus, we found Caps for Slats)

Looking for a space you can rent by the hour on Capitol Hill? Here's a start

Looking for a space you can rent by the hour on Capitol Hill? Here’s a start

One of the big challenges for creating a thriving Capitol Hill Arts District? Finding spaces to meet, work, and perform that are accessible to artists and community groups. The Seattle Office of Arts and Culture has rolled out a new tool to help. Spacefinder Seattle is “a database that will eventually include every rental space in the region that’s available to artists, and arts and cultural organizations” —

The site’s database includes presentation spaces, such as theaters, galleries, cinemas, and museums, and the relatively invisible artists’ creative spaces, such as studios, rehearsal rooms, and offices. There will be event spaces, meetings spaces, and even raw retail and warehouse spaces for lease. The site is launching with approximately 200 spaces, and will grow over time. Spacefinder Seattle allows artists to search the database by dozens of variables, including price and availability. There are no fees associated with using the site, which is underwritten by the City’s Office of Arts & Culture. It is envisioned as a tool to connect artists and arts organizations to available spaces for development, rehearsal, or presentation of their work, and encourage the regional artspace marketplace.

10661931_10154826244120008_6929457198356361607_oYou can check out the listings at spacefinderseattle.org. The office is also working to promote “the economic activity generated by arts and cultural activities, and educates citizens, property owners, and developers on the importance of the arts to property values and neighborhood character,” an announcement of the new tool reads.

One venue not on the Spacefinder map is CHS advertiser the Comet Tavern but that’s where we found a piece of “lost” Capitol Hill art. Turns out, Caps for Slats, the bottle cap mural of the Pike/Pine character, found a home inside the E Pike bar. Last year, we reported on the mostly organic plans for many of the pieces found on the Sound Transit “Big Red” construction wall once the barrier starts coming down. A Sound Transit spokesperson tells CHS the wall art belongs to the artists. “In Slats case, Cameron Larson, the artist, no longer lives in the area and didn’t have a way to move it,” the spokesperson said. “We made sure he was OK with it going to The Comet when that came up as an option.” Comet co-owner Dave Meinert said he was “psyched” to be approached about the piece. “Slats was a regular,” he said.

“It’s another bit of local history in what’s becoming the local historical tavern,” Meinert said.

 

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5 thoughts on “New Spacefinder helps *find* *space* for arts… and more around Capitol Hill (Plus, we found Caps for Slats)

  1. Can we please stop talking about “creating” a thriving Capitol Hill Arts District? Capitol Hill had – WAS – a thriving arts district for years/decades prior to the current development boom.

    The spacefinder site is a great resource. It would be nice if the site would either emphasize the spaces run by independent groups/nonprofits or charge for-profit groups to list their spaces.

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