What it’s like being in the same bar as Real World: Seattle

(Image: @uhluviuh via Twitter)

(Image: @uhluviuh via Twitter)

What is it like having the Real World: Seattle cast living and playing in the neighborhood? Ask Capitol Hill resident Julia Aaker about her recent brush with the production inside a Pike/Pine bar over the weekend.

“That’s what made me mad!” she tells CHS of the moment when an apparent Real World producer intervened to stop a bouncer from removing a foul-mouthed bigot from the bar Aaker and friends were in Saturday night. Aaker says the producer wanted to keep the creep in the scene for the reality TV shoot.

Aaker’s tale played out in a series of Tweets Saturday night about the strange episode that involved homophobic language and pouring a drink on two women brave enough to speak up:

Aaker tells CHS the night started with her and a group of friends paying cover at a Pike/Pine bar to watch the big UFC fight.

As they watched the under-carders beat on each other and the main bout approached, their waitress came out to tell the group they would either need to order more food or move to another area of the bar — the Real World was coming and owners wanted a festive scene with lots of food.

The production crew was also looking for more than an onscreen fight. Aaker said one male patron began shouting slurs during the fight “Gonna get you, you fucking faggot… bitch ass nigga!” After women at another table began arguing with the patron, Aakers said it sounded like a member of the Real World crew came over to tell the male that with his yelling, they weren’t going to be able to use the scenes being shot that night. But the message apparently had a different effect on the patron. He left the area around the cameras and quickly returned, throwing a drink on the women. As the bar’s security descended, Aaker’s moment of anger came. The MTV producer yelled “Don’t kick him out,” and continued the shoot inside the bar.

“The producers of the show made the bar not throw this pathetic excuse for a man out of the bar because it added good drama,” Aakers said via Twitter.

Earlier this summer, CHS reported on the agreement Real World creators were requiring local businesses sign to be part of the production. Some agreed, many did not. The contract includes some choice passages illustrative of the art of reality television:

Producer shall have the right to refer to the Property by its actual name or any fictitious name, and the right to attribute actual or fictitious events as occurring on the Property, and the right to replicate the Property and use such replication in Producer’s sole discretion.

The show’s 32nd season represents a return to Seattle for the franchise. According to fan sites, season 32 features double the roommates as “a broken’ friendship, relationship, etc.” joins each of the original seven cast members in the house. Introducing 14 people to the neighborhood, there are bound to be a few run-ins here and there and most Tweets and Facebook posts about encountering the cast are more of the excited, brush-with-celebrity type than what Aakers encountered Saturday night.

Aakers, who has lived on Capitol Hill for four years, says before this weekend, the Real World wasn’t much more than a nuisance — apparently the crew sometimes films near the gym where Aakers works out — but now she’s disappointed to have the MTV show be part of the neighborhood.

“If we’re not kicking people out, that’s just letting it slips through the crack,” she said talking about the weekend incident Monday afternoon. “We’re letting this irrelevant TV show dictate how our businesses are being run.”

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18 thoughts on “What it’s like being in the same bar as Real World: Seattle

  1. It’s the businesses decision tofilm or not if Akers doesn’t like it don’t go there it’s none of her business

    • Are you f**ing kidding? The Capitol Hill community is supposed to stand by and let patrons have drinks tossed on them, all for the amusement of a bunch of losers watching SlackerTV? That doesn’t speak too highly of the bar management to condone that. And why aren’t we naming the bar? Is it because of it’s a CHS advertiser?

    • @jim98122x

      no, the community isn’t supposed to just stand by, however, at the same time, a business has a right to allow or refuse service to customers based on their judgement (no matter how ignorant that judgement may be).

      the solution, for the community, is to boycott the business. let them know that their stance to side with “real world” producers is such that we no longer want to spend our money with them. though, i’d like to hear their side of the story; not just ms. aaker’s.

      i too would like chs to publish the name of the bar where all this occurred.

  2. it’s also up to customers and the neighborhood community to decide for themselves if they wish to continue spending hard earned dollars in a joint that would go along with this bullshit…

    • Someone had a drink thrown on them at a bar, while watching two men beat each other for sport? OH THE HUMANITY, IS THERE NO FAIR AND RIGHTEOUS GOD TO SMITE THESE BROS?!

      Meanwhile in Syria….

    • “Crymeariver on Tuesday, August 23, 2016 – 9:22 am said
      Meanwhile in Syria….”

      So– the fact that horrendous atrocities are being committed elsewhere around the world excuses any and all lesser bullshit perpetrated here? Yeah, that totally makes sense.

    • Jim, a lot of things happen late night in bars because you know . . . drunk people. I think this incident is merely an excuse to complain about The Real World being in our midst. Some people seem to think this production (which tends to be @4-6 people) doesn’t “deserve” to be here and is beneath our community. Personally, I think it is kind of fun and frankly, not that big a deal.

  3. These Real World sinners need to REPENT!!!! We need to keep our beloved Hill pure and vanquish it of all heathen non-hipsters. REPENT! REPENT!

  4. This is 100% on the establishment. They signed off on MTV filming in their bar. I spoke to a production assistant and at anytime, if you have a problem with the cast or crew in your place of business, you can ask them to stop filming and leave. It all under signed contract that both parties agree to.

  5. Did you reach out to the bar for comment? If this happened it’s a pretty serious license violation by the bar. It would seem only right to get their side before you publish.