Here’s what’s next for the old Charlie’s on Broadway space

The old Charlie’s (Image: CHS)

Connecting the dots on our report from April that yet another minute clinic-style health care business was coming to Broadway, the restaurant space CityMD will be moving into and turning into an outpatient facility on Capitol Hill’s main drag is none other than the longtime home of Charlie’s.

Company officials have yet to confirm the project but people familiar with the plans say the CHI Franciscan Health-backed venture will open the new office after an overhaul of the old restaurant.

CHS reported in April that CityMD was planning a project for the property that includes the Broadway Alley retail mall.

Charlie’s on Broadway closed — again — in January some 40 years after its birth.

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10 thoughts on “Here’s what’s next for the old Charlie’s on Broadway space

  1. Those “clinics” are the equivalent of the 99¢ stores. I would do a thorough review before entrusting my health to one of them. Also, replacing going-out places, such as restaurants and bars, with banks and clinics will certainly not halt North Broadway’s demise as a vibrant street.

  2. I hope they auction off the big framed photos. Always loved sitting in a booth with Gary Cooper or Wallis Simpson. So very unhappy about this new tenant. We don’t need more of the same on Broadway!!

  3. This is sad. Another minute-clinic could just as easily go in any of the tons of new apartment buildings with ground-floor retail, all of which have zero personality and look like an aquarium. The Charlie’s space has warmth and funky charm that isn’t needed for a medical clinic.

  4. I’m bummed out about this. Is there really a market for yet-another such clinic on Broadway? These places are fast-food medicine. Whatever happened to finding a primary care provider you can trust and staying with him/her for years? That arrangement surely provides better medical care than these drop-in clinics, which are all about the money.

    • To play Devil’s advocate– It’s not really an “either/or”. I have a primary care doc that I’ve used for 20 years and am happy with. I have also used these Doc-in-a-box clinics too, for straightforward things like immunizations. I have friends with no insurance who have used them for pay-cash doctor appointments. And they can be open later than traditional doctor’s offices, so people who lose pay would not have to miss work. There IS a place for these– though I’m not sure so many, especially all on Broadway. I think this will make 3.

    • Point taken, Jim. But why pay the (inflated) cost for an immunization, when you can get most of them (not all) at your primary care doctor and get them covered by insurance? And don’t most people get paid time off from their employer when they have to see a doctor?

    • Bob,
      Why pay the (inflated) cost for an immunization, when you can get most of them (not all) at your primary care doctor and get them covered by insurance?
      A: it’s also covered at these places, too. Not sure about everyone’s but my insurance covers it 100% whether I get it from my doctor, a pharmacy, or a minute-clinic.

      Don’t most people get paid time off from their employer when they have to see a doctor?
      A: nope. Lots of people don’t. They either lose pay, or they have to use part of a sick day (if they even have them); or PTO (if their vacation & sick time are rolled together). So it’s like having to take part of a vacation day to get a shot. Lots of hourly workers get neither.

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