Driver reportedly runs over man sleeping at First Hill parking entrance — UPDATE

A man reportedly sleeping along the sidewalk at a Terry Ave parking garage entrance was treated by medics after being hit by a driver early Monday morning, according to emergency radio dispatches.

Seattle Police says it responded to the incident and may have more information soon and we have not yet heard back from Seattle Fire on specifics regarding the man’s non-life threatening injuries. UPDATE: SFD reports the victim, a 57-year-old male, was transported to Harborview in serious condition.

According to East Precinct radio dispatches, SPD and Seattle Fire units were called to the 500 block of Terry Ave around 6:45 AM after a driver reportedly ran over a man in his 50s outside a First Hill apartment building just off Boren and James.

According to police updates, the man was found unconscious but breathing. Jefferson between Terry and Boren was closed briefly to traffic during the response.

Monday’s incident will add to the tally of serious collisions on Capitol Hill, Central District, and First Hill streets so far in 2019 as SDOT struggles to address Vision Zero goals in the city. “We want to engineer our streets for slower speeds so that pedestrians and bicyclists are less exposed to traffic,” an SDOT representative tells CHS about the unfortunate trend. “But we also need people who are out there to be sober and paying attention.”

 

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8 thoughts on “Driver reportedly runs over man sleeping at First Hill parking entrance — UPDATE

  1. I don’t understand why homeless people sleep in obviously dangerous places like that. Were they so high or out of it that they didn’t notice that they were about to pass out in the driveway?

  2. These events cost millions in uncompensated care in hospital, public safety and others costs. They may dared the 100 million or so spent on the vagrants we host. Oh, and can’t forget criminal justice costs for those arrested and tried.

    Stop being a magnet Seattle. Sweep the streets and repeat as needed.

    • These events cost millions in uncompensated care in hospital, public safety and others costs. They may dwarf the 100 million or so spent on the vagrants we host. Oh, and can’t forget criminal justice costs for those arrested and tried.

      Stop being a magnet Seattle. Sweep the streets and repeat as needed.

      • And then what? Shift the costs to incarcerating homeless people for— what, exactly? The “crime” of being homeless? Once you’ve “swept the streets”, what do you propose to do with those hundreds of people?

      • There is plenty of shelter space for the small percentage of truly homeless people in Seattle. The drug-addled traveling vagabonds will simply move on to the next city or town faster if our governments finally start enforcing simple laws… like not letting people sleep on the streets, driveways and sidewalks!

      • There is plenty of shelter space for the small percentage of truly homeless people in Seattle.

        Citation please. A majority of shelters don’t have mental health treatment or drug rehab program. The “plenty of shelter space” are basically a “bed at night, don’t care where you go during the day, but you can’t stay here” type of shelter. Oh, and you have to be and stay sober during your stay. We all know quitting alcohol or heroin cold turkey is super easy!

        The drug-addled traveling vagabonds will simply move on to the next city or town faster if our governments finally start enforcing simple laws… like not letting people sleep on the streets, driveways and sidewalks!

        And when they don’t? The City sweeps open encampments, but that has had exactly zero effect on the homeless problem. Do we start arresting the homeless? Do we drive them to the edge of town, never to return under pain of summary execution?

        The problem with the “tough love” method is that the homeless are already at rock bottom. They have nowhere to go, some have turned to drugs, others have mental illness problems. Constantly harassing or threatening them is going to have no effect on them because their lives literally can’t get any worse.

        The homeless problem has already been solved in other countries and even other places in the USA: house the homeless, treat the mentally ill and cure the addicts.

        Yes it will cost money, but we can easily pay for it by repealing the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 and the Tax Reform Act of 1986, also know as Reagan’s tax cuts, which cut the top tax bracket from 70% to 38.5%

    • There is plenty of shelter space for the small percentage of truly homeless people in Seattle. The drug-addled traveling vagabonds will simply move on to the next city or town faster if our governments finally start enforcing simple laws… like not letting people sleep on the streets, driveways and sidewalks!

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