Grab and go at By Tae, secreted away inside Chophouse Row

By the time this post hits Facebook, you had probably already be hustling through the back alleys of Chophouse Row. The handrolls move fast at By Tae and the lunchtime counter can fill up faster.

Chef Sun Hong’s settled-in pop-up has been open for a few weeks in the small counter space behind Marmite and Spirit in the Bottle in the Pike/Pine food, shopping, and office complex on 11th between Pike and Union. But the don’t-necessarily-call-it sushi chef is still working out a schedule. By Tae is currently open 11:30 AM to 2:30 PM weekdays for lunch, with occasional “drinking hour time” openings at night and weekends still in the works. Continue reading

We’re calling it ‘Tbilisi grey’ — Dacha Diner ready to open on E Olive Way

(Image: Dacha Diner)

From matador hot pink to Tbilisi grey — “Tricorn Black,” the owners say — the wedge of a restaurant building in the 1400 block of E Olive Way is nearly complete with its Eastern European transition. It is almost time for Dacha Diner to serve its first “Eastern European cuisine with Jewish fare” breakfasts and lunches.

CHS broke the news in September on the new project from Joe Heffernan, Tom Siegel, and Tora Hennessey as the plan rounded into shape for an Eastern European flavored diner to replace the tacos and tequila of The Saint. “There’s a frugal character to it. The flavors come through with a certain honesty,” Siegel said of the cuisine Dacha Diner is setting out to share. “When it’s done poorly, it’s shameful. But when it’s done properly, there’s nothing like it out there.” Continue reading

By the Pound rent mess includes $18K owed for 10th Ave Estate fashion shop — UPDATE

An image of the papered over Estate on 10th Ave from the court filings

In 2017 when CHS first reported on the arrival of the club-focused 1923 Management and F2T Hospitality company offices on E Olive Way, a plan for a new ambitious speakeasy-style bar in the neighborhood also included a twin fashion retail venture’s move to the Hill.

With the shuttered By the Pound now embroiled in a $75,000 lawsuit over unpaid rent, it turns out paying the bills is also an issue for the fashion end of things on Capitol Hill for the companies involved.

According to King County Superior Court records filed in October, the company behind Estate — “a home for international streetwear/contemporary menswear. Brands: Estate, Represent, Knomadik, En Noir, Stampd La, Chapter, I Love Ugly & much more” planned but now shuttered in the new Modera building on 10th Ave — owed around three months in in unpaid rent for the Pike/Pine shop. Continue reading

What’s open on Capitol Hill Thanksgiving 2018

Let us give thanks. For the baristas and the bartenders. The budtenders. The Amazon Prime delivery people. Bike shares. And your neighbor’s wi-fi. Below, we’ve compiled our annual roster of coffee joints, grocery stores, etc. where your friends and neighbors will be working to make sure you have the happiest holiday possible. As for getting a post-feast cocktail, that list is up to you. Take a chance. Make sure to tip. And be thankful.

COFFEE

    • Vivace — Brix and other locations- Closed, Walk-up open from 7am-430pm
    • Ladybug drive-thru – Busy signal, you tell us in the comments
    • Starbucks Roastery 7am -11pm, Roy Street – 630am-330pm
    • Fuel 19th – 8am – 1pm
    • Victrola 15th, 7am-3 or 4pm (the baristas weren’t sure) and Victrola Pike 630am – 2pm
    • Caffe Vita – 7am-2pm

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Shuttered By the Pound deli speakeasy evicted over thousands in unpaid rent

There’s a bigger mess than the construction reportedly underway at the shuttered By the Pound deli and bar.

A King County Sheriff’s eviction notice has gone up on the venue’s locked E Olive Way door. Court records show the companies behind the project owe more than $75,000 in unpaid rent — plus daily rent of $317.24 for every day after Halloween they didn’t vacate the premise, and more than $1,600 in attorney’s fees and hundreds more in costs. Continue reading

With Dirty Thai cocktails and punchline plans, Bites of Bangkok now open on 15th Ave E

Pranesh Sharma is now pouring on 15th Ave E. The laughs are coming soon.

With plans for a familiar recipe combining Thai food and comedy, Bites of Bangkok is now open on 15th Ave E.

What? You’re not familiar with the traditional Capitol Hill pairing of live comedy performance and the cuisine of Bangkok? Let Capitol Hill residents Jansri Parichat and Pranesh Sharma delight you. Continue reading

Sol Liquor to host a bit of Capitol Hill Christmas past: a Sun Liquor eggnog pop-up

(Image: Sun Liquor)

Not everything has to change. Summit Ave’s original Sun Liquor may now be Sol Liquor — and under new ownership — but a holiday favorite is scheduled to make a return to the bar this week.

A special pop-up is slated for Friday night at Sol as Sun Liquor’s famous aged eggnog makes a temporary return to Capitol Hill. The first glasses are scheduled to be poured at 5 PM. Happy holidays.

Originally only a seasonal treat for neighbors visiting the bar before finally bottling it for sale on a small scale, Sun has grown its eggnog business into a Santa-sized annual event with retail distribution.

Continue reading

After ‘positive’ talks, New Seasons and community groups opposing new store set for Central District agreement — UPDATE: ‘Disappointed’

UPDATE 11/19/18 12:30 PM: Despite hopes of an agreement from representatives on both sides Friday, Monday, activists and community groups who have been engaged with New Seasons said they are “disappointed” that officials “gave no indication the company is committed to change.”

“We can’t wait around while New Seasons’ corporate leadership thinks a little more about respecting our community’s values, and we’re not going to stop calling on them to respect workers’ rights,” the group writes in a statement sent by the Good Jobs Coalition.

“We’re not going away,” the group writes, “and we call on other community members to join us…”

The full statement has been added at the end of this post.

The grand opening of New Seasons in Ballard included this group of protesters

Original report: Unlike what happened at its May opening in Ballard, you probably won’t see protesters greet New Seasons when it opens at 23rd and Union in 2019.

A company spokesperson said it plans to meet Friday’s deadline for a response after positive talks with community groups aligned to push back on the Portland-based grocery chain’s labor practices and its ownership’s anti-LGBTQ politics as it readies to open in the Central District.

Friday’s deadline is part of a community coalition’s demands for the chain:

During their meeting, organizers gave New Seasons co-president Kristi McFarland and other local reps a list of demands. If the demands are met, they said, their campaign against the company would stop. Among other things, they asked New Seasons to sign a neutrality agreement to let interested workers unionize, disclose workforce demographics, let low-income customers use Fresh Bucks to buy produce, stock affordable staple foods, and donate some of their local profits to affordable housing projects and community land trusts.

Nicole Keenan, executive director of Puget Sound Sage, an advocacy group dedicated to low-income people, communities of color, immigrants and refugees, has been part of talks with New Seasons and also categorized the negotiations as positive in a conversation with CHS Friday afternoon. Keenan joined reps from groups like the Squire Park Community Council in the discussions with New Seasons.

While we don’t yet know the specifics of the New Seasons response, the community campaign against the store which has included a “newseasonstories.com” website and neighborhood yard signs, appears to be approaching a fruitful conclusion.

UPDATE 3:40 PM: A New Seasons representative sent over the company’s response to the community groups. We’ve added the full letter at the end of this post. A company representative also provided the following statement:

At New Seasons, we are proud of our established track record as an active civic partner that is committed to directly engaging in building community in a way that reflects our shared progressive values. We’ve been working with a Central District Advisory Council made up of business leaders, local nonprofit representatives and neighborhood council members to understand the needs of the neighborhood, but when we were contacted by this group we wanted to hear their perspective as well. At the meeting, we shared our commitment to championing higher wages, comprehensive benefits for all kinds of families, an inclusive culture, as well as using our voice to stand up for affordable housing, hunger relief and other important social justice and workplace issues that affect everyone. We also took away some valuable ideas from our conversation that we will be exploring further.

Continue reading

Heritage Distilling Capitol Hill celebrates grand opening, ‘blessing of the still’

Its heritage on Capitol Hill already runs four months deep but Heritage Distilling’s backside of Pike/Pine tasting room will celebrate a grand opening this weekend.

“Expect music, a blessing of the still, ribbon cutting, discounts on bottle sales, tastings and more,” the folks at HDC Capitol Hill — the “C” is for “company” — promise. Continue reading

Tiny Broadway taco shop and its Guaymas family of restaurants comes up big as state drops $5.6M tax case

Attorney General Bob Ferguson and investigators from the Washington State Department of Revenue who started their search at a Broadway restaurant have huevos rancheros on their face after allegations of a $5.6 million tax fraud scheme at the Seattle chain of Tacos Guaymas fizzled into a poquito $750 fine.

“It is really a great example of the philosophical Occam’s razor,” Robert Chicoine, lawyer for Tacos Guaymas owner Salvador Sahagun said in a statement to CHS. “If there are two explanations for an occurrence, the one that requires the least speculation is usually the correct explanation.”

Ferguson’s office charged Sahagun earlier this year with six counts of first-degree theft and three counts of possessing and using sales suppression software in what the AG said was a multi-year scheme to pocket more than $5.6 million in sales tax from cash transactions. Continue reading