This week in CHS history | Hill rents on rise (in 2014), Seattle’s first bike box, CC Attle’s last days on Madison

screen-shot-2016-09-23-at-3-31-54-pmHere are the top stories from this week in CHS history:

2015

 

What counting every Pike/Pine pedestrian on a summer night reveals

Capitol Hill food+drink | Peloton at center of bicycle cafe pack coming to Pike/Pine, 12th Ave


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CHS Pics | This week in Capitol Hill pictures

Evening constitutional through Cal Anderson Park. Seattle, WA. September 2016.

The CHS Flickr Pool contains more than 32,000 photographs — most of Capitol Hill images, many glorious, some technically amazing. The pool is a mix of contributions from Capitol Hill — and nearby — shutterbugs. Interested in being part of it? If we like your photo and it helps us tell the story, we may feature it on CHS so please include your name and/or a link to your website so we can properly credit you. Interested in working as a paid CHS contributor for scheduled assignments? Drop us a line –- our roster is full for general assignments but pitch us on an idea. Continue reading

‘We can build 1,000 homes’ — Sawant eyes $160M from blocked SPD precinct project for affordable housing

Kshama Sawant says blocking the bunker will pay off with $160 million for affordable housing in Seattle — if the city changes the way it uses Real Estate Excise Tax (REET) funding.

The Socialist District 3 representative rallied supporters Thursday at the Central District’s Washington Hall for a night to celebrate what Sawant says was a “historic victory” for “anti-racist and social justice activists” after Mayor Ed Murray’s announcement that the $160 million plan to build a new Seattle Police precinct headquarters in North Seattle was being pulled back for a racial equity review. Continue reading

Capitol Hill Community Post | Rally Tonight, Bunker Blocked! Build 1,000 Homes Instead

From Councilmember Kshama Sawant

SEATTLE – Councilmember Kshama Sawant (District 3, Central Seattle) will host a rally Thursdayevening to demand that the City fund 1,000 units of affordable housing with the funds previously intended for building a new North Precinct police building.

Councilmember Sawant will unveil key details that explain how this funding can be made accessible to affordable housing projects. She and other speakers will also directly address assertions that a new North precinct is necessary.

“This week’s brutal killings of black people in Tulsa and Charlotte at the hands of the police, and the protests in response, remind us that a struggle for affordable housing and against economic inequality are inextricably linked with racial justice. We stand in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement,” Sawant said.

Affordable housing advocates, racial justice activists and members of the faith community will call for the development of City-funded affordable housing. Several speakers will explain why they believe the North Precinct is a gross misuse of public funds.

WHAT:
Bunker Blocked! Rally to #Build1000Homes Instead! – hosted by Councilmember Kshama Sawant

 

WHERE:
Washington Hall

153 14th Ave, Seattle 98122

 

WHEN:
Thursday, September 22

6 p.m. – 8 p.m.

 

WHO:

Councilmember Kshama Sawant

Sharon Lee, Executive Director, Low Income Housing Institute

Violet Lavatai, Membership & Development Coordinator, Tenants Union of WA State

Reverend Robert Jeffrey, Pastor, New Hope Missionary Baptist Church

Ubah Warsame, Somali & East African community advocate

Abdi Mohamed, Somali & East African community advocate

Kailyn Nicholson, Organizer, Socialist Alternative

Rabbi David Basior, Kadima Jewish Community

Rachel Padgett, member, Washington Federation of State Employee Local 1488

Ijeoma Oluo, Writer, Speaker, Editor at Large at The Establishment

And others.

Capitol Hill Community Post | New campaign answers question: Transgender people are _______?

transformsiteicon screen-shot-2016-09-19-at-2-46-14-pmFrom Transform WA

Statewide public education campaign will increase understanding of what it means to be transgender Celebrates the dignity, diversity, humanity of transgender Washingtonians

WASHINGTON STATE – An innovative statewide public education campaign celebrates the dignity, diversity, and humanity of transgender and gender non-conforming people. Available to the public at TRANSformWashington.com, the campaign aims to increase public understanding that all of us, including our transgender friends, family members, co-workers, and neighbors, deserve the freedom to live our lives with privacy, safety, and dignity.

The stories and experiences of transgender and gender non-conforming Washingtonians and their families, featured on the site, offer visitors an opportunity to better understand what it means to be transgender.

The campaign leaves open the statement Transgender people are _____ and then fills in the blank with photos and stories from transgender people who are parents, musicians, health care practitioners, children, grandparents, students, and so on.

“Just 23% of people in Washington say they personally know someone who is transgender. So it’s not surprising the general public doesn’t understand what it means to be a transgender or gender non-conforming person,” said Project Coordinator Jeremiah Allen, who is a transgender man and parent to three children.

Nicole Browning, Board President of Pride Foundation, said, “As a lesbian and an ally, I have learned so much from mytransgender colleagues, friends, and family. I am excited to be a part of this effort so I can better support my community and understand the diverse lived experiences of transgender and gender non-conforming people at this critical time in our state.”

Just two months ago, a group tried, and failed, to gather enough signatures to put an initiative on the 2016 ballot to repeal Washington’s 10-year old non-discrimination protections for transgender people.

“We want to increase public understanding that all of us, including our transgender friends, family members, co-workers, neighbors, and children, deserve the freedom to live our lives with privacy, safety and dignity,” said TRANSform Washington Advisory Committee member Rochelle Long of Renton, who is the mother of four children, including one transgender child.

The campaign emphasizes that transgender people come from every walk of life, ethnicity and from every corner of the Evergreen state. What transgender people have in common is that they face greater discrimination and violence just for being who they are.

“Transgender people, like me, are a part of the fabric of our community – we are parents, grandparents, children, business owners, musicians, health care practitioners, college students, retirees, employees, and veterans,” said TRANSform Washington Advisory Committee member Everett Maroon, of Walla Walla, who is a transgender man, parent, and author.

The TRANSform Washington website features Cheryl, a retired transgender woman in her 70’s who lives in Gig Harbor with her husband Tom. ” I want to demonstrate to the world that we are successful people who live lives of good work and positive success,” she says.

“What’s great about our state is that Washingtonians believe everyone should treat each other with understanding and respect, and expect the same in return,” said TRANSform Washington Advisory Committee member Lucas Leek, a transgender man who lives and works in Spokane. “We believe all Washingtonians deserve to be safe, to be their true selves, and to live free from discrimination.”

Pride Foundation, a regional community foundation investing in full equality for LGBTQ people across the Northwest, is funding the new digital campaign, which features profiles, photos and first-person accounts, along with an online video series that will be available later this year. TRANSform Washington is similar to public education campaigns recently launched in Alaska, California, and New Hampshire.

Governor Inslee to debate challenger Bryant on Capitol Hill — Plus, Clinton-Trump debate watch parties

Next week, Washington’s gubernatorial candidates will be part of a political doubleheader, of sorts. You can have front row seats.

Governor Jay Inslee will debate his Republican challenger Bill Bryant on Monday night, September 26th at Seattle U’s Pigott Auditorium in a tilt scheduled for first pitch as soon as the first debate between presidential rivals Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump wraps:

Governor Jay Inslee and his challenger, Bill Bryant, will face off in November’s gubernatorial election. Join us at Seattle University for a robust discussion of the issues between Inslee and Bryant at the Washington State Debate Coalition’s inaugural debate! Seattle University is part of the Seattle CityClub’s recently-formed Debate Coaltion and is proud to host this debate in conjunction with our 125th anniversary. Because this event is televised live, audience members are asked to take their seats by 7:30 PM for the 8:00 PM start time.

Free tickets for the gubernatorial debate are available here. You can also watch live on KING-5 television. Continue reading

This week in CHS history | Ernest Loves Agnes debuts, Uncle Ike’s born, Grrl Army

img_0289-600x400Here are the top stories from this week in CHS history:

2015

 

Capitol Hill food+drink | First look at Ernest Loves Agnes

‘Open items’ — First Hill Streetcar hits more delays

Now open on Bellevue Ave: Kedai Makan’s wandering days are over


Continue reading

CHS Pics | This week in Capitol Hill pictures

Kinski at Chop Suey on August 18th 2016

The CHS Flickr Pool contains more than 32,000 photographs — most of Capitol Hill images, many glorious, some technically amazing. The pool is a mix of contributions from Capitol Hill — and nearby — shutterbugs. Interested in being part of it? If we like your photo and it helps us tell the story, we may feature it on CHS so please include your name and/or a link to your website so we can properly credit you. Interested in working as a paid CHS contributor for scheduled assignments? Drop us a line –- our roster is full for general assignments but pitch us on an idea. Continue reading

On the List | Leviathan Helm in Volunteer Park, Park(ing) Day 2016, Eat Out, Art Hack Day

The weekend around Capitol Hill will bring art and creativity of all shapes and sizes — some monstrous. But first, make sure you stop by one of the 20+ locations participating Thursday in the Eat Out Seattle benefit for County Doctor community clinics.

Thursday through Tuesday, you can find artist Lauren Grossman and her Leviathan Helm creation installed at the top of the Volunteer Park water tower. “There will be mystery,” Grossman said. “A lot of people that will come up won’t be coming up to see the work. They’ll get sound and color as they come up the stairs. As they arrive, they’ll find a 50-foot wide installation. I don’t think it’s too scary.”

Friday and Saturday bring the return of Park(ing) Day to Seattle. The annual event celebrating street parks across the Hill and Seattle returns with a special two-day expansion in 2016.

Around the same time, artists and techies will be teaming up to create magnificent things inside 11th Ave’s V2. At Saturday’s Art Hack Day party, you can witness the glorious art hacking first hand.

There is plenty more to keep you busy around the Hill this weekend including the Pride Lives Walk, an SDOT meeting at Top Pot to discuss an expansion of RPZ 15, and the 15th Ave E Merchants Sidewalk Fest. You can find these and more — or add your own — on the CHS Calendar. Continue reading

City fleet’s 30% goal puts Seattle electric car initiative into first gear

Mayor Ed Murray and City Council member Mike O’Brien test drove an electric vehicle this week to celebrate progress on Seattle’s electric car initiative, a plan that includes improving the infrastructure for EVs, electrifying the city’s own vehicle fleet, and continuing Seattle’s ongoing conquest to cut carbon emissions and pollution from transit.

In the video of the stunt, we learn Murray does the driving in this relationship, neither of these guys drive very often, Murray owns a Subaru Forester, and O’Brien can spout EV trivia like Rain Man. We also learn that the City Council’s Transportation and Sustainability committee Wednesday approved a resolution “which sets a goal to have 30% of all light-duty vehicles in Seattle operate under electric power by the year 2030.” The EV champions Murray and O’Brien also “announced their intention to significantly expand electric vehicle infrastructure in Seattle, such as charging stations, to encourage and serve the electric vehicle demand.” Continue reading

SDOT looks at Restricted Parking Zone 15 expansion across I-5 Shores

caphillrpz8444334030_3d6c40fa08_o-1A new drive has begun to create a major expansion of Restricted Parking Zone 15 to cover most of the densely-packed streets between Broadway and I-5 north of E Olive Way with two-hour parking restrictions for drivers from outside the neighborhood.

“RPZs are intended to improve parking access for residents, while balancing the needs of others to use the public right of way,” SDOT said in its announcement of the newly proposed expansion. “RPZs help neighborhoods deal with parking congestion from traffic generators through signed time limits from which vehicles displaying a valid RPZ permit are exempt.”

Here is how SDOT is explaining the proposal:

  • The gray area on the map is the new RPZ, using E Roy St and Belmont Ave E as the northern boundary.
  • In the gray area, RPZ signs would be installed on the color-lined blocks, limiting vehicles without zone permits to 2-hour parking Monday to Saturday, 7 am to 8 pm.
  • All residents in the gray area would be eligible for permits in the new RPZ.
  • Permits are currently $65 per vehicle for two years. Guest permits are also available.
  • Signs would not be installed next to commercial properties, nor would they replace existing paid or time limited parking.

You can provide feedback on the plan with this SDOT survey or by emailing capitolhillparking@seattle.gov by September 26. SDOT staff will also be available “to take comments and answer questions” at Top Pot Doughnuts, 609 Summit Ave E on Saturday, September 17, 2016, from 10 AM to 12 PM. Continue reading