The Murder of Tyrone Love

Margarita Quevedo-Walker and Tyrone Love

Margarita Quevedo-Walker and Tyrone Love

By Sakara Remmu/Special to CHS

Since 2007, Sakara Remmu has been a reporter and commentator covering social and political issues for KBCS Radio, The Seattle Times, and a number of regional and national news print and online outlets. She is the Founder and Managing Editor of BOMBCo; Black Owned Media Broadcasting Company, and Executive Producer of the podcast series Under the Redline, currently featuring the story of the Killing of Tyrone Love.

Innocent
In the late 2000s, shootings and murders — particularly of young black men — seemed almost common on the streets of Seattle. The Central District murder of Tyrone Love was different.

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(Image: CHS/Source: data.seattle.gov)

When the Seattle Police Department confirmed the identity of the man gunned down near 27th and Cherry February 15th, 2009 it was unlike anything most had seen or felt before. A city, across neighborhoods, race, religion, class and age, collectively knocked down, and stunned into disbelief, despair, and anger.

The bullets that killed Love hit his family, friends, his neighborhood, and the city at large. The funeral was standing room only. It was one of the few times the mayor himself, and not a delegate, attended the funeral of a homicide victim, specifically a black man. The mainstream media, quick to report such incidents as gang-related violence, initially did the same with Love’s murder, casting him an unsympathetic victim, blaming assumed yet inaccurate self-created circumstances. As far as the media was concerned, if Love was murdered because of gang affiliation, then in a way he was responsible for his own death; it’s a narrative we see time and time again.

Love was none of the things Seattle typically associates with shootings and murders of black men. He wasn’t a gang member or criminal. He didn’t have a criminal record. At 26, he was part founder and owner of a successful business with friends and business partners Jamar Jones and Bruce Williams. He was the provider for his family, including his mother, sisters, and girlfriend. Love had a seemingly stellar reputation in Seattle, with no known enemies. The night he was murdered, he was doing what he did countless times, going home from work. There was no particular incident leading up to the murder that provide clues about motive, or suspects; he didn’t argue with anyone and was thought to be alone as he walked. He was simply gunned down on the sidewalk, just blocks from his home.

His girlfriend, Margarita Quevedo-Walker, dropped Love off at work the night he was murdered. She was also the one who realized, hours later, that something was wrong. Love had not come home. In an interview with me in 2009, she recalled waking up around 4:30 in the morning and realizing his side of the bed was empty. She sent out texts to those closest to him, who sent out texts to their networks. No one knew where Love was. By 9:00 AM, the unimaginable was at the front door. Continue reading

CHS Pics | This week in Capitol Hill pictures

Time for pizza

The CHS Flickr Pool contains more than 34,000 photographs — most of Capitol Hill images, many glorious, some technically amazing. The pool is a mix of contributions from Capitol Hill — and nearby — shutterbugs. Interested in being part of it? If we like your photo and it helps us tell the story, we may feature it on CHS so please include your name and/or a link to your website so we can properly credit you. Interested in working as a paid CHS contributor for scheduled assignments? Drop us a line.

I can see myself in a Maserati
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Another Capitol Hill crossbike to be installed on E Pine

Capitol Hill’s already colorful pavement is about to get a few more markings on E Pine near Broadway. The Seattle Department of Transportation says the intersection of Pine and Nagle will be the next on the Hill to get the “crossbike” treatment:

We use bright green paint to make crosswalk-like stripes at intersections where bicyclists and drivers have come into conflict. Some people call these striped lanes a “crossbike.” Think of it as a crosswalk for people biking.

The city says a crossbike can help raise “awareness for both bicyclists and motorists to potential conflict areas” and “makes bicycle movements more predictable,” among other benefits. During last September’s Park(ing) Day street park pop-ups around the city, the Cascade Bicycle Club’s installation created a semi-separated bikeway along the same stretch’s also conflict-creating eastbound lane. Continue reading

‘Two amazing, kick-ass women’ — Developers recognized with Capitol Hill Spirit Award

Adele wasn’t the only award winner hoping to share her praise in recent days.

“I couldn’t be more proud of my neighborhood than at this moment,” Pike/Pine developer Liz Dunn told the crowd as she reflected on the wave of activism in the neighborhood at last week’s State of the Hill event held at Optimism Brewing. Continue reading

22 stories from the CHS archives full of Valentines, love, etc.

Here are a few of our favorite Valentine’s Day, love, loveless, hugs, kisses, and, yes, (not scary) sex stories from the CHS archives. Happy Valentine’s Day.

Photos from the Valentine’s Day tube tournament

Hillebrity | Constant Lovers

CHS Pics | Bag of Valentines for Capitol Hill at Republican and Boylston — UPDATE: V-day happenings

CHS Pics | The Valentine’s service turkeys of the Central District

A new candidate for the ’10 best places to kiss on Capitol Hill’ list

Castle sex store making plans to open in Pike/Pine

Man steals armful of sex toys from Babeland — including special vibrator

Sex toy bandit hits Broadway ‘megastore’

Babeland celebrates 20 years of sexuality and satisfaction on E Pike

Pikes/Pines: The sexy songs of Capitol Hill spring

The Loveless Building: A Brief History

CHS Pics | A shield of love in Montlake

Modern Love, Capitol Hill-style

CHS Pics | Capitol Hill Valentine violinist

Artist’s giant hands getting ready to join kissing jets in Capitol Hill Station

9 Capitol Hill buildings worthy of a woman’s love

CHS Re:Take | Hidden stories of love at Broadway and John

All Pilgrims ready to grow $200K Same Love Garden on Broadway

Experiment on your lovesick heart, keep Capitol Hill’s art pulse beating at the Heartbreak Science Fair

Hey, somebody in the 98122 ZIP code, somebody loves you — Is this your lost love letter?

CHS Re:Take | Love letters shaped our city (Summit Line part 1)

CHS Pics | Happy (early) Valentine’s Day — Seattle celebrates marriage equality

CHS Pics | This week in Capitol Hill pictures

snowy serenity
The CHS Flickr Pool contains more than 34,000 photographs — most of Capitol Hill images, many glorious, some technically amazing. The pool is a mix of contributions from Capitol Hill — and nearby — shutterbugs. Interested in being part of it? If we like your photo and it helps us tell the story, we may feature it on CHS so please include your name and/or a link to your website so we can properly credit you. Interested in working as a paid CHS contributor for scheduled assignments? Drop us a line.
On Broadway
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Halted by the Depression, $10.5M project to complete Saint Mark’s will begin this spring

building-access-new-1024x464Thanks to the Great Depression, Capitol Hill’s Saint Mark’s was never truly completed. This spring, construction will begin to clad the amazing old church in proper limestone and replace the depression era glass windows that have somehow held up for 88 years:

Saint Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, the iconic building situated on a prominent bluff high above I-5, is Seattle’s most visible symbol of faith. Construction of this “beacon on the hill” began in 1928, but was halted after the stock market crash of 1929, and never fully completed. The enormous concrete walls were never meant to be exposed to the elements, and the cheap depression-era glass windows were not meant to be permanent. In 2012, chunks of concrete began to break away from the exterior walls, posing a safety risk, and it became urgent for Saint Mark’s Cathedral to address the deteriorating state of the walls and windows. Continue reading

Capitol Hill startup Shelf Engine gets $800k seed to grow ‘highly perishable food’ AI

Anybody who has made a Capitol Hill coffee shop their office is probably familiar with neighborhood entrepreneur Stefan Kalb’s work. His Molly’s brand sandwiches and snacks are a ubiquitous part of the Seattle-area cafe scene. Another of his ventures just got a big financial vote of confidence:

Shelf Engine, a Seattle-based startup who uses artificial intelligence to help retailers and distributors order better to optimize for profits in highly perishable food categories, announced today a seed investment of $800k. The investment from Bay Area and Seattle funds is lead by Initialized Capital with participation by Founder’s Co-op, Liquid 2 Venture, and other angel investors enabling Shelf Engine to scale in 2017.

Kalb and co-founder Bede Jordan created Shelf Engine to help reduce waste in the Molly’s business, according to an announcement on the funding round. The startup’s office is on 12th Ave below Plum Bistro and La Spiga in the Piston Ring building.

“Most grocery stores leave ordering of fresh food up to individual category managers. But those managers typically lack appropriate tools and data needed to match orders of hundreds or thousands of products to demand,” CEO Kalb said in the announcement.

Shelf Engine’s order prediction engine analyzes historical order and sales data to generate automated order recommendations, according to the company.

Kalb has stepped down from his CEO role at Molly’s to focus on Shelf Engine, the Seattle Time reports. The news will also create a few new 12th Ave jobs. Much of the financing will go toward hiring developers.

You can learn more at shelfengine.com.