Meaty Johnson’s brings ‘Seattle barbecue’ to Capitol Hill

Pine’s newest addition is surely a win for the meat lovers of Capitol Hill. In May, Meaty Johnson’s BBQ opened at 1201 Pine.

“It’s one thing to make barbecue good, it’s another thing to make it good all day so that people can enjoy it,” said Meaty Johnson’s namesake, Zac Johnson, who also works as a real estate agent and music promoter. Johnson began barbecuing as a hobby, and it quickly became a hit with his friends and family. He then began catering for huge house parties of friends and the reception continued to be overwhelming.

Meaty Johnson’s got its entendre-ful start at Cowgirls, Inc., the notorious country bar concept with a 1st Ave Seattle location. Continue reading

With a snip of a ribbon, two years of construction starts on Capitol Hill Station development

On the warm night of June 19th, 2018 a celebration did its best to fill the empty space around Broadway’s Capitol Hill Station as ground broke on the new development that includes new retail, 428 housing units — 178 of which are affordable housing, and a new community plaza featuring the AMP: AIDS Memorial Pathway remembering those who have succumbed to the disease.

The event included a band that played jazz music through the evening, the Capitol Hill Neighborhood Farmer’s Market popping-up with a preview of the coming plaza’s future, and free Dick’s burgers provided by the drive-in across the street. It was hard to find someone not holding a carton of water being given out for free to assuage the thirst of the attendees as they mingled under the evening sun.

“Today’s a really important day for us and the community as we officially kick this construction project off, and really start seeing the dirt move,” said Jill Sherman of lead developer Gerding Edlen who also emceed the night’s proceedings. Continue reading

True Hope Village, a tiny piece of Seattle’s big homelessness and affordability problem, moves forward in the Central District

Employees of Vulcan gathered for a day of community service to construct the 30 homes destined for the Central District’s True Hope Village (Image: Vulcan)

Monday afternoon, the Seattle City Council is set to approve the legislative underpinning to Mayor Jenny Durkan’s “bridge housing” plan creating a $9.5 million a year program for shelter and “tiny house” encampments. So-called bridge housing is the rare cog in Seattle City Hall’s engine that still seems spinning forward for solutions to the city’s intertwined homelessness and affordability crisis. And, despite pushback from within and from beyond the neighborhood, a new tiny house village planned for the Central District might be the most solid effort at this point to build something new to help put more people in shelter.

CHS reported earlier on plans for the encampment and a set of community meetings about the project. The vision has withstood the process. True Hope Village is being constructed at 18th Ave and E Yesler Way.

The Low Income Housing Institute (LIHI), which is leading the project, has learned from past skepticism and opposition to the village projects, organizing community meetings earlier in the process to give a space for nearby residents to voice their concerns and create transparency, Josh Castle, director of advocacy and community engagement for LIHI, said. Continue reading

20 years of community engagement set to pay off as ground breaks on Capitol Hill Station’s ‘transit oriented development’

The future view of “Building A” from Broadway (Image: Hewitt)

On Tuesday, June 19th, a celebration for the groundbreaking of the new development at Capitol Hill Station will be held at the Broadway site. The event will include live music, the Capitol Hill Neighborhood Farmers Market, and food and drinks from local businesses. The festivities, organizers say, are a way of giving back to a community that has done so much over the past two decades to make the project a reality.

Capitol Hill Station Development Groundbreaking

The idea for the development on Sound Transit’s surplus land surrounding the station first began to shape in the late 1990s when light rail was first being pitched and developed. The community didn’t want a simple brick plaza to lay in the empty space created by the station, and saw this as a way of revitalizing the Broadway corridor that had lost much of its vibrancy.

“The goal was to restore the heart of Broadway,” Cathy Hillenbrand, a longtime community advocate of the undertaking said. Continue reading

Merlot, pinot, and chardonnay on tap with less waste the plan for Capitol Hill’s Footprint Wine

Seattle is beer country with more breweries than any other city in the nation. Kenneth Dillon, a Seattle wine aficionado, has decided to do something about evening the score — and doing it with a new, more environmentally friendly approach.

Dillon plans to open his own unique Footprint Wine bar and tap on E Madison by September.

“I’m happy to now be joining the Capitol Hill wine community and hope to give a little back to the community one glass of wine at a time,” Dillon said.

Before realizing he could work with wine as a career, Dillon spent 10 years in human resources, including four at the University of Washington. He always had a passion for the grape since it was legal for him to drink it, but didn’t actually break into the industry until 2016. Continue reading