About jseattle

Justin is publisher of CHS. You can reach him at chs@capitolhillseattle.com or call/txt (206) 399-5959. Follow @jseattle on Twitter or be best pals on Facebook.

The mayor of Capitol Hill 2017: Bob Hasegawa Q&A

Hasegawa: We were lied to.

CHS: So, this is about Sand Transit and the way it’s run? Not light rail?

Hasegawa: When it went to the ballot I said “I support ST3. Even though it’s $54 billion, we need it.”

CHS: It’s an interesting fine point, and it’s a big dollar fine point and it just…

“It’s about accountability from leadership. That’s what my whole campaign is about right now.”

Hasegawa: It’s a crucial fine point. If you’re not being told the truth, when we’re passing legislation that has the huge financial impact on people who are fixed income that are already being gentrified and priced out of the city, and mind you, we had the McCleary… We knew we had to find another $4.5 billion just to fund McCleary, so how likely are we going to be able to pass a revenue package now with all the email that I’m getting with people who are angry about the price of their car tabs and all this other taxes that they’re getting hit with.

CHS: But at the same time you said you wouldn’t have done anything different.

Hasegawa: No I wouldn’t have. I didn’t.

CHS: That’s, I think, the hard part.

Hasegawa: I just wanna be told the truth. If you are coming to us, don’t lie. Tell me the truth and let me make up my mind for myself.

CHS: Alright. Alright, well we will try…

Hasegawa: See that’s why I didn’t want to get into it, because it’s too fine…

CHS: You’re telling me it’s not about factual Sound Transit package, it’s about the agency.

Hasegawa: It’s about accountability from leadership. That’s what my whole campaign is about right now.

CHS: Alright. I wonder if people will care. I’m curious to see if people will care.

Hasegawa: Accountability?

CHS: Yes.

Hasegawa: I think people want to be told the truth.

CHS: Yeah? Well I wouldn’t wanna be told the truth. I wonder if people will care that it costs $54 instead of $15 billion.

Hasegawa: You don’t think so? [laughter]

This testy exchange was just the start of things in one of the feistiest conversations in CHS’s interviews with the mayoral candidates. State Sen. Bob Hasegawa didn’t like being labelled anti-transit — his issue is with the way the transit agency is run, he told CHS, not trains. We also talked with the longtime labor leader and 11th District senator about his push to create a municipal bank and his belief that the city needs a champion for South Seattle and underserved communities in City Hall. You can learn more at bobhasegawa.com.

Unchained by a damaging sex abuse scandal that removed incumbent Ed Murray from a powerful pole position, 21 candidates are vying this summer to be the next mayor of modern-day Pacific Northwest boomtown Seattle, Washington. Of those 21, only two will survive the first round cut from the August 1st primary. CHS may be on a summer news break but we couldn’t resist opportunities to talk with the candidates most likely to be on the mind of Capitol Hill voters in the coming weeks: Jenny Durkan, Nikkita Oliver, Cary Moon, Bob Hasegawa, Mike McGinn, and Jessyn Farrell. The interviews were conducted in recent weeks at locations across the city including coworking spaces, campaign offices, and a diner. The talks varied but revolved around a core set of Seattle issues: Black Lives Matter, affordability, addiction, and homelessness. We have edited the conversations for clarity and length.

CHS: I hear people sometimes say that we should put every penny we can towards…

Hasegawa: Education. Continue reading

Police search unsuccessful after woman robbed on 24th Ave

Police are investigating a reported armed robbery after a woman was mugged and thrown to the pavement on the backside of the Midtown Center commercial block at 23rd and Union Tuesday night.

According to East Precinct radio dispatches, the suspect grabbed the victim and claimed to have a gun pressed against her as he shoved the woman down and stole her wallet on 24th Ave just after 10:30 PM Tuesday.

Police spread out across the area and a K9 unit searched for the suspect described as a black male around 5’6″ and heavyset, wearing a white tank top, and dark jean shorts, last seen fleeing the area on foot to the east.

The search was not successful and there were no arrests. No serious injuries were reported.

CHS Crime Dashboard — Reported robberies by month — East Precinct (Source: SPD)

With a rise in gun incidents and shootings across the city, robberies are down so far this summer in the East Precinct and the area around the Midtown Center has seen fewer incidents of gun violence after a spike earlier this year.

In May, developers announced a $23.25 million deal to acquire the Midtown block for long-planned redevelopment.

The mayor of Capitol Hill 2017: Cary Moon Q&A

CHS: Alright lets jump in. Yeah, I don’t know. Do you ever read interviews with candidates? I always find them kind of boring.

Moon: Yeah. Because everybody’s so careful, they say all the positive things.

CHS: Yeah. And there’s not anything that has to change that at all. But I do try… Well, I’ll try and ask more Capitol Hill kinda, Central District kinds of things. I’m curious to know — can you set the stage for me instead of me trying to write… Where are we in Seattle’s history? And what’s going on? What’s the state of this city right now?

Moon: Yeah. I think what started off as feeling like, “Wow, we’re so popular. Wow, we’re thriving when so many places aren’t.” And the feeling of excitement and satisfaction and being part of the winning team. I think that quickly turned to, “Oh my God. What’s going on?” And, “Can I afford to live here?” And, “Are my kids going to be able to live here?” And, “What are we doing to our creative soul?” And you know everybody is freaking out because all of a sudden, it doesn’t feel like we’re in control of this. We’re not guiding the future of our city. It’s happening to us, not by us and for us and that is scary and people feel all kinds of insecurity. They feel housing insecurity. They feel economic insecurity. They feel like, “Is this my culture? Is this like the Seattle I love?” Or, “Is that completely evaporating?” And so people are scared.

Unchained by a damaging sex abuse scandal that removed incumbent Ed Murray from a powerful pole position, 21 candidates are vying this summer to be the next mayor of modern-day Pacific Northwest boomtown Seattle, Washington. Of those 21, only two will survive the first round cut from the August 1st primary. CHS may be on a summer news break but we couldn’t resist opportunities to talk with the candidates most likely to be on the mind of Capitol Hill voters in the coming weeks: Jenny Durkan, Nikkita Oliver, Cary Moon, Bob Hasegawa, Mike McGinn, and Jessyn Farrell. The interviews were conducted in recent weeks at locations across the city including coworking spaces, campaign offices, and a diner. The talks varied but revolved around a core set of Seattle issues: Black Lives Matter, affordability, addiction, and homelessness. We have edited the conversations for clarity and length.

“That wealth is being extracted away from the community…”

Below, CHS talks with Cary Moon, the urbanist and civic leader who was the Co-Founder and Director of the People’s Waterfront Coalition. Moon carries the endorsement of The Stranger into the August Primary. CHS spoke with her about the state of the city, her approach to building our way out of the affordability crisis, and whether City Hall should help make sure Pike/Pine bars and restaurants can pay their rent. You can learn more at carymoonformayor.com.

CHS: But these are the good times, aren’t they? I mean we’re doing financially very well.

Moon: Okay, if you look at GDP, style gross metric, sure. But that doesn’t tell a story of what’s happening on the ground. Because on the ground we’re creating credible wealth through our sky rocketing property values through the profits that are being made by mostly big corporations — some small businesses, too — but that corporation wealth is not circulating back into the community. That wealth is being extracted away from the community and so instead of a healthy economy where everybody benefits and everybody who’s part of building the profits gets to share in the profits and businesses are locally owned so wealth they create gets circulated back in new investment or expansion. That’s what we typically think of, of a booming economy. That’s not what’s happening here. Continue reading

The mayor of Capitol Hill 2017: Nikkita Oliver Q&A

CHS: We already spoke to you way back when. It felt good to be out in front of the buzz around your campaign, so I’m glad we had a chance to get you on. These are boom times for the city, but clearly boom times aren’t necessarily happy times. There seems to be a lot of concern and worry when I talk to the candidates, and I know that’s part of the reason you’ve got involved. So, what’s going on in the city? Why are we this way? Why is it a bummer to be so successful in the way we are structured now? What’s broken and what’s the start of fixing that from your perspective?

“I do feel moved in terms of knowing that there are some incredibly wealthy people in our city who do want to see equity become a reality.”

Oliver: Yeah. I think what’s beautiful about Seattle is people are attracted to our city. It’s green. It’s next to water. There’s an incredible amount of culture here, and some attempts to preserve that and so I think it’s what make it an attractive city. I think the struggle is, is we have lacked a vision for equitable development. We have a race and social justice initiative. We use a lot of equity terms, but in practice we don’t really know what that looks like, and also have not been willing to ask our developers and corporations to invest in that. Also having such an upside down tax system and in some ways legally being relegated to using those structures has really put us in a bad place.

Unchained by a damaging sex abuse scandal that removed incumbent Ed Murray from a powerful pole position, 21 candidates are vying this summer to be the next mayor of modern-day Pacific Northwest boomtown Seattle, Washington. Of those 21, only two will survive the first round cut from the August 1st primary. CHS may be on a summer news break but we couldn’t resist opportunities to talk with the candidates most likely to be on the mind of Capitol Hill voters in the coming weeks: Jenny Durkan, Nikkita Oliver, Cary Moon, Bob Hasegawa, Mike McGinn, and Jessyn Farrell. The interviews were conducted in recent weeks at locations across the city including coworking spaces, campaign offices, and a diner. The talks varied but revolved around a core set of Seattle issues: Black Lives Matter, affordability, addiction, and homelessness. We have edited the conversations for clarity and length.

Below, CHS talks with Nikkita Oliver, the poet, teacher, lawyer, and community activist whose campaign has also formed a movement in the Seattle Peoples Party. We asked Oliver about how her social justice vision applies to issues as ranging as development and transit — and if her views of the city and its issues around race and equity have changed as she nears City Hall. You can learn more at seattlepeoplesparty.com.

Oliver (continued): But also, I just think all in all our city has lacked a vision, not just in terms of urban planning but also in terms of the city we want to grow into be. We have a lot of great language around it and so I could see where people maybe would see it as a bummer but I also see an incredible opportunity for Seattle to take the lead and show what it looks like to see where your city maybe has been failing and admit that, acknowledge it, be accountable for it, and then actually make a real plan forward that challenges this placement and makes our city more affordable and more equitable. So, while I could see where people who maybe share your sentiments are coming from, I also just see an incredible opportunity. There’s so much wealth in this city, and I’m incredibly moved by the number of people who have access to that wealth, who do desire to see our upside down tax situation corrected.

CHS: Has your perspective changed in that regard? You’ve got a chance now… You’ve been exposed to maybe some of the power brokers of the city. Do you feel better about Seattle now that you’re in the race than you did before? Continue reading

The mayor of Capitol Hill 2017: Jenny Durkan Q&A

Unchained by a damaging sex abuse scandal that removed incumbent Ed Murray from a powerful pole position, 21 candidates are vying this summer to be the next mayor of modern-day Pacific Northwest boomtown Seattle, Washington. Of those 21, only two will survive the first round cut from the August 1st primary. CHS may be on a summer news break but we couldn’t resist opportunities to talk with the candidates most likely to be on the mind of Capitol Hill voters in the coming weeks: Jenny Durkan, Nikkita Oliver, Cary Moon, Bob Hasegawa, Mike McGinn, and Jessyn Farrell. The interviews were conducted in recent weeks at locations across the city including coworking spaces, campaign offices, and a diner. The talks varied but revolved around a core set of Seattle issues: Black Lives Matter, affordability, addiction, and homelessness. We have edited the conversations for clarity and length.

“If you look at the real data, there’s no question that it has improved, dramatically…”

The first Q&A in our series is with former U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan, perceived by many to be the likely frontrunner after the August tally. The polished prosecutor was guarded but repeated her strong support for the police reform process at SPD in the wake of the Charleena Lyles killing, said neighborhoods should have more control over affordability-focused rezoning, and weighed in on homeless sweeps saying unsanctioned encampments “are not a moral choice.” The full conversation is below. You can learn more at jennyforseattle.com. View all CHS Jenny Durkan coverage here.

Durkan: When I was in high school, I played in the state basketball playoffs, and I went to a very small high school, I was the center. That gives you some idea. And our coach got sick, so I was player-coach, and we played Chimacum. Oh man, they grew those girls big there.

CHS: I bet, I bet. People used to say that about my hometown. I’m from a small town and all the city kids used to make fun of our town, ’cause they were like, we were supposedly the big, dumb country kids.

Durkan: Big but not dumb.

CHS: Let’s move on to larger things. You are a champion of the Seattle police reform process, you’ve said many positive things about it.

But with the Charleena Lyles shooting, and maybe even especially the community’s reaction to it. Has that changed your view at all on the progress that’s been made? Has that put it into a new light?

Durkan: I think that we have to remember that reform is a process, and I have been clear to say from the minute we announced our investigation to when we announced the consent decree, that a police department has to always improve and get better. And the key to police reform was looking at those data on use of force. We found 70% of the time the police were using force in an 18-month period. They used it against someone who was in mental health or under the influence of drugs and alcohol. 70% of the time. So that’s why so much of the focus was on crisis intervention, and created a crisis intervention committee to say, “Okay, what is the training that we need top to bottom for police, so that they can have a better working relationship on the streets with people in crisis.” Revamped how they were trained, how dispatch was trained so they’re listening for clues and can dispatch the right people to it. Continue reading

Ollie Quinn bringing Canadian eyewear fashion to the Pike/Pine ‘neighbourhood’

Coming soon: Ollie Quinn (Image: CHS)

Some 60,000 eyeballs — 30,000 attendees with approximately two eyeballs per person — will roll through E Pike for the 2017 Capitol Hill Block Party this July. There will be a bit of side-eye — and plenty of near and farsightedness.

Ollie Quinn, the Canadian-born provider of eyewear fashion, will join the increasingly crowded field of shops hoping to serve those many, many eyes with its new Capitol Hill boutique planned to open by the end of this month in a long-empty retail space with a clear view of the Block Party’s main stage at Pike and Broadway.

“We want it to be a space that people feel drawn to and are comfortable lingering in, which is why we have a community working space built within where community members can come to study, create or chat,” a company spokesperson tells CHS. Continue reading

With new location in works, Purr plans 11th Ave ‘Going Away Party’

The rumors have become fact — or, at least, a going away party.

Purr has announced a July 19th celebration to say goodbye to its longtime 11th Ave home… and ownership says details on a new location for the Pike/Pine gay bar could be coming soon.

And the Party is just beginning…… Please join us for our “Going Away Party” on Wednesday July 19th. as we say goodbye to our “current” location. We’ve been proud to serve you here on 11th Ave for 12 strong years, and will continue to do so in our “new location”. Stay tuned for additional news as we work on solidifying details of our new home. Hope to see you all there!

Owner Barbie Roberts tells Seattle Gay Scene the move is simple economics:

Barbie also stressed to us that she’s not leaving the current location out of any bad feelings or due to the building being torn down. It’s simply the end of her current lease and she decided not to continue at that location due to the rent hike she would face under a new lease. It’s Economics 101, folks…gentrification leads to property values going up, followed by a big jump in rents which is something that effects both individuals in apartments as well as small business owners in commercial locations.

The Purr exit will leave a new space along 11th Ave without a tenant just as another moves in. In May, CHS reported that the Rain City Fit gym would soon neighbor Purr in the location left empty when kink retailer The Crypt shuttered in 2015.

A former employee of Manray and The Wildrose, Roberts opened Purr in 2006 in the former home of the Bad JuJu lounge. In 2011, CHS talked with her about the features of a successful gay bar and surviving the changes of growth in Pike/Pine.

As for where Purr, one of the Hill’s last remaining dedicated gay bars, lands next, stay tuned.

 

The busiest 80 square feet on Broadway makes room for expansive Kosmic Koffee

(Image: Kosmic Koffee)

The busiest 80 square feet of cafe space on Broadway is back in action. And entrepreneur Anthony Davis has plans to cram even more into the little coffee shack in the midst of the hustle and bustle on Capitol Hill’s main drag.

Kosmic Koffee debuted for a sneak peek over Pride weekend marking yet another incarnation for the coffee shack at the corner of Broadway and Harrison. Regular hours are coming soon.

“We were driving down Broadway and saw the stand. It was a two hour decision process after I saw the sign,” Davis tells CHS about the “go go” nature of his latest venture. Davis also is part of Anslinger Capital, an “emerging market fund, focused on the legal cannabis market,” and venture capital concern Monition Partners. With those kinds of entrepreneurial roots, you can expect more from Kosmic than cups of coffee.

“I have a farm with chickens so I’m also selling farm fresh eggs,” Davis said. He’s already got a brand for the eggs thought up: Just Got Laid.

More unusual menu items are to come. Continue reading

Warby Parker latest big brand with plans to join Pike/Pine

(Image: Warby Parker Fremont)

A burst of block-long, preservation incentive-boosted apartment buildings has already created hundreds of new — expensive — homes along Pike/Pine below Broadway. The developments are also reshaping the commercial mix for the neighborhood with big name brands and new-era retail showcases.

The next big name to join E Pine, CHS has learned, will be fashion eyewear retailer Warby Parker on a stretch of street that is meshing Capitol Hill development with downtown demographics.

While the company has not yet responded to CHS requests for information about the planned store in the eight-story Excelsior building at Melrose and Pine, permits show plans for a $388,000 buildout of a new eyeglass shop, the third Warby Parker store in Seattle. Continue reading

Man shot in leg overnight at 12th/Olive

A man was shot in the leg and police received conflicting reports about the possible shooter in a shooting early Thursday morning near 12th and E Olive St.

Police were called to reports of people yelling and multiple gunshots just before 2 AM near the 1700 block of 12th Ave. They arrived to find a male who had suffered a gunshot wound to the leg.

The shooter was initially described as a white male with a slim build, bald head, and wearing an all blue sweatsuit or possibly medical scrubs. But other witness accounts provided a different description. According to police dispatch radio reports, the victim told police the shooter had accused him of breaking into a car.

Police searched the area for the shooter. A K9 unit was not immediately available but a dog brought to the scene later helped officers search the area yard by yard. Police were also hoping to collect video evidence of the incident from a nearby resident.

We do not have further details but the male’s injuries were not described as life threatening by Seattle Fire radio.

Thursday’s incident took place a block from the site of a November 2016 shooting in which the victim eventually died from his injuries. SPD has not announced any arrests in connection with that case.