Updated Asian Art Museum lease proposal includes free visits, arts education for Seattle Public School students

Up against an end of year deadline, the Seattle City Council committee overseeing legislation required before the start of construction on the expansion of Volunteer Park’s Seattle Asian Art Museum made a “ratify and confirm” decision on a 55-year lease for the continued operation of the cultural center. The council’s parks committee is now ready to get around to the confirm part of the business.

Friday afternoon, the Civic Development, Public Assets, and Native Communities Committee will hear public comment on the final two pieces of legislation in the SAAM expansion process. One bill, when approved, will alter city code to allow expansion of a “non conforming” museum inside a city park. It’s a custom patch written specifically for the SAAM expansion that will also limit any future expansion. Continue reading

Police investigate Broadway apartment stabbing — UPDATE

A man was reported stabbed multiple times in the chest and another was in custody in an attack inside a Broadway apartment Thursday night.

Police and Seattle Fire responded to the Lyric building just before midnight Thursday. East Precinct radio reports described one victim with multiple stab wounds. Another person in the third-floor apartment was in custody but required medical attention for possible excited delirium, according to radio reports.

Police arrived in time to stop the violent attack and help keep the 29-year-old from bleeding to death: Continue reading

Machine House taproom will be E Jefferson neighborhood pub with cask ales and football on the telly

(Image: Machine House)

If you want to do it right — create your own cask ales, “served through beer engines and at cellar temperature” — you’re going to have to do it yourself. Georgetown-born Machine House Brewery is building a cozy tap room and soccer pub to showcase its English-style beers amid the growing food and drink scene along E Jefferson because it’s a bloody shame to waste great beer.

“Very few pubs can serve it properly,” Machine House co-founder Bill Arnott tells CHS. “We’ve found we need to control the experience. We need bartenders who can explain and present it.”

“It’s this kind of thing that doesn’t have the best reputation if you get it wrong. When it’s done right it’s completely exceptional.” Continue reading

A good time to visit Capitol Hill’s ‘most strange & unique book bunker’ Horizon Books

What if we told you Horizon Books was still alive? We reported the 15th Ave E bookshop’s closure in 2009. Eventually, another book shop would take its place. But Horizon never really went away as it retreated below ground, squirreled away on 10th Ave in the middle of Pike/Pine. Over the summer, it looked like Horizon was about to say goodbye again before it sprang back once more in September.

Thursday night might be a good time to get reacquainted as the underground bookstore hosts a January Art Walk open house:

Horizon Books will be showcasing the large, mostly figurative oil paintings of Seattle artist Rani Laik. We will also be featuring spoken word artists: *Jesse Bernstein whose poetry revolves around themes of life, death, race, relationships, love, family, social issues, and politics. *Gui Chevalier will be reading select poems from his 2016 book entitled “Radical Human” *Darwin Manning, among others. Live acoustic music provided by Jose Simonet. The event runs from 5-9pm with drinks and snacks provided.

Horizon’s ownership says it is now trying to build one of “the most strange & unique book bunkers in all of Seattle.” Stop by!

Horizon Books is located at 1423 10th Ave. You can learn more at facebook.com/seattlehorizonbooks/.

Worker dies in fall at Seattle U dorm construction site

State labor officials are investigating the death of a 23-year-old ironworker who suffered a fatal fall in late December from atop Seattle University’s dorm and office project near Madison and 12th Ave.

Raymond Estores is reported to have fallen down an elevator shaft in the Saturday, December 30th morning incident from near the top of the 10-story Vi Hilbert Hall project under construction along E Madison. Seattle Police and Seattle Fire were called to the scene just after 9 AM. Continue reading

Officials unsure how many thousands to expect on Capitol Hill as plan for 2018 Seattle Women’s March comes together

In 2017, the first marchers reached Seattle Center before the last marchers left Judkins Park (Image: CHS)

For the thousands hoping to come to Capitol Hill for the January 20th Seattle Women’s March, we have two words for you: light rail.

In 2017, officials believe more than 120,000 people marched from the Central District’s Judkins Park as part of the march, the city’s contribution to women’s rights marches across the country in the wake of Donald Trump’s election victory. But, to be honest, they’re not sure. It was impossible to count. In 2018 with a year since the election passed and with some advocates saying it is time to move beyond demonstrations, nobody knows how many thousands will gather January 20th on Capitol Hill for this year’s rally and march.

Organizers and city officials are preparing and gathered Wednesday to plan for how to help those thousands get to and march off of Capitol Hill in the smoothest, safest, most First Amendment-y way possible. Continue reading

After findings of bias and improper use of force, Seattle Police move into final phase of federal reform

The first phase in the five-year Department of Justice-mandated overhaul of the Seattle Police Department is complete. Wednesday, U.S. District Judge James Robart granted the City of Seattle’s motion that its police department is in “full and effective compliance” with reforms ordered after findings of biased policing and improper use of force.

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan who led the U.S. Attorney’s office in Seattle at the time of the consent decree said Wednesday that SPD still has more work to do. “It has been a long process, and I want to make very clear that the work needs to continue,” she said.

The mayor’s statement on the judge’s ruling included some of the data collected during the reform process:

The monitor took two years and studied all of the uses of force in the Seattle Police Department to determine whether there was full and effective compliance. In that two-year period, as the court indicated, there were 760,000 incidents to which Seattle police officers were dispatched – 760,000 incidents in a two-year period. Really important: less than one percent ended up in any force at all being used: .5%. And of those, 80% of them were the lowest level of force, what’s called type 1, which means there may be transient pain but no serious injury. Importantly, we did not even keep track of when that type of force was used before there was a consent decree. That was one of the requirements of the consent decree. Only 39 incidences were using the most—more serious levels of force.

An eight-month DOJ investigation of Seattle policing released in winter 2011 revealed troubling findings about the department’s use of force. Justice filed a consent decree and negotiated a plan with SPD to overhaul the department. SPD’s overhaul included a DOJ-approved use of force policy.

The next phase under the consent decree agreement calls for a two-year review period after which Seattle’s police department could be free from federal monitoring.

Durkan, meanwhile, is beginning her search for a new police chief after Kathleen O’Toole stepped down to start the new year. Carmen Best, the city’s first black woman to fill the post, currently serves as interim police chief.

Blotter | Man says beaten in Comet assault for objecting to Trump ‘faggot’ slur

See something others should know about? Email CHS or call/txt (206) 399-5959. You can view recent CHS Crime coverage here.

  • Comet assault: A man told police he was beaten at the Comet Monday night in an altercation with a group of patrons who were yelling “‘faggot’ at the television when President Donald Trump was being shown.” SPD’s bias division is reviewing the case. According to the SPD report on the incident, the victim told police he was paying his tab at the Comet around 7 PM when he decided to intervene and tell the yelling group that using that word “in a public place out loud was not appropriate and that they should stop.” “The primary suspect then turned around and punched V/1 in the face with a closed fist. The five other suspects listed above then jumped on V/1, forcing him to the ground,” the report notes. The melee continued out of the bar and onto the sidewalk where the group of six continued to beat and chase the two victim and his acquaintance. Police say the Comet bartender could not provide many details but confirmed one patron “had been kicked out of the bar and was causing a disturbance with other customers but he did not see a fight or anyone being assaulted.” SPD reports that injuries suffered by the victims in the attack were minor. A friend of the victim who reported the incident to CHS tells said his friend suffered a broken nose and a concussion. SPD is investigating. Continue reading

Seattle U’s new campus store now open at 12th and Madison

Seattle University’s overhaul of its campus at the corner where 12th meets Madison has a newly opened component — the school’s new bookstore, carved out of the first floor of the storage facility building at the intersection, is now open for business. Continue reading

Why Roy Street Commons, a short-term rental exception, stands alone on Capitol Hill

When the Seattle City Council passed a set of regulations designed to boost affordability by reeling in short-term rentals, one Capitol Hill property owner got very lucky.

The regulations passed in December generally restricted the number of housing units a person can operate as a short-term rental to a unit in their own home, plus one more unit. There were a couple exceptions which allowed for grandfathering operators of properties to continue doing so, with some restrictions which vary by where in the city the units are. The rules will go into effect January 1st, 2019.

But there was one more exception.

A very carefully worded exemption which seems to apply only to a single building in Seattle — the Roy Street Commons at 621 12th Ave E. Continue reading