Also saved — and going legit — on Bellevue Ave E: the Harry’s Fine Foods Chandelierium

(Image: Harry’s Fine Foods)

You can wish Harry’s Fine Foods a very happy second birthday this week and congratulate the Bellevue Ave E eatery on its paperwork — its once threatened Chandelierium is going legit.

Back in January, CHS reported on the fight with the city over the 800 200 or so square feet of covered patio chef and owner Julian Hagood created on the backside of Harry’s. “We rapidly built this beautiful little patio covering to allow our guests to enjoy our patio year round however the city has determined it violates building and energy codes,” Hagood told CHS at the time.

Now, Hagood confirms that he has undertaken a full land use permitting process with architectural firm Hoedemaker Pfeiffer to allow the structure to remain part of the bistro. Continue reading

A memorial to Max Richards, the last* pedestrian killed on a Capitol Hill street

A memorial to Max Richards is a reminder of his wife Marilyn Black’s love for the man who died this week in 2016 after being struck by a driver while crossing Belmont Ave E with his dog.

The flowers are also a marker of a stretch of time that hopefully continues — a pedestrian hasn’t been killed on Capitol Hill streets in two years. Continue reading

‘Saved’ from microhousing plan, Capitol Hill’s Roy Vue Apartments to be considered as Seattle landmark

A coalition led by Historic Seattle and residents of Capitol Hill’s Roy Vue Apartments has put the Bellevue Ave E building up for consideration for Seattle landmarks protections.

A plan for to convert the building to microhousing was stopped by a campaign led by building tenants, neighbors, and preservation advocates earlier this year.

A second report on the 94-year-old “eclectic Tudor Revival” structure was prepared at the request of property owner Alliance Multifamily Investments, according to the document (PDF) posted to the Department of Neighborhoods landmarks site. That report from July is now labeled as a “Historic Resource Report.”

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Save the Royvue! Residents rally to thwart sale of Capitol Hill building

A view worth the fight? A look across the Royvue courtyard (Image: Haley Blavka Photograph/Save the Royvue)

Seattle’s endorsement of rapidly adding thousands of efficiency sized housing units to the cityscape has some residents in Capitol Hill unconvinced that one size fits all. Tenant-led group Save the Royvue has escalated its effort to keep the 94-year-old building from succumbing to development plans that would significantly reduce apartment size. The growing assembly of advocates says the Royvue Apartments is fine the way it is and now seeks landmark protections to keep it that way.

Eugenia Woo with Historic Seattle is consulting with the group and shares their worry that “the city is losing its identity.”

“This city has always been known for its character and that distinguishes us. It’s ok to have good new designs but unfortunately most of what’s being built is not so great,” she said. Continue reading

Up against rent boom and affordability crunch, residents worry about plan to change 1924-built Royvue into microhousing

Residents of a classic 94-year-old Capitol Hill apartment building hope to organize against a plan to gut the structure and turn its 34 apartments — some as large as four or five room spaces — into more than 100 units of microhousing.

“Everyone in the building is obviously going to be kicked out,” one resident tells CHS of the project. “This place is one of the most beautiful buildings I’ve seen in the neighborhood and I can’t believe there aren’t any checks in place to preserve other ones like it.”

In an affordability crunch and a boom market for rents, Seattle is doing everything it can to create more homes and landlords on Capitol Hill have been particularly creative trading away parking and laundry rooms (and sometimes retail space) for more places to live. Continue reading

Save the Chandelierium? City targets covered patio at Harry’s Fine Foods

Two years ago, chef and owner Julian Hagood turned the old corner store at Bellevue and Mercer into the “bistro-esque” Harry’s Fine Foods. But his transformation of the patio behind the restaurant into “The Chandelierium” hasn’t gone over as well with city planners. Hagood told customers Wednesday he’ll have to tear down the Harry’s addition.

“It is with a heavy heart that the Department of Construction and Inspections of Seattle has determined that our beloved patio enclosure known as ‘the chandelierium’ is to be torn down by Monday the 26th of February,” Hagood writes. “We rapidly built this beautiful little patio covering to allow our guests to enjoy our patio year round however the city has determined it violates building and energy codes.” Continue reading

With the push of a button, nuanced Ghost Note Coffee opens on Capitol Hill

Christos Andrews’ quest to do “every little small thing we can to make it better” when it comes to a cup of coffee was celebrated in a grand opening on Bellevue Ave with a Tuesday of demonstrations and a showcase of its fancy pants coffee machine.

Ghost Note Coffee, named for a silent beat with rhythmic value “but no discernible pitch,” is about nuances and raising the bar with custom mugs from a local ceramics maker, collared shirts and uniformed employees, no tipping, fresh herb and citrus garnishes, and “an emphasis on housemade elements borrowed from craft bartending.” Continue reading

Capitol Hill food+drink | First look: Harry’s Fine Foods reborn at Bellevue and Mercer

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Hagood (Images: CHS)

A new life for an old bodega has begun at one of Capitol Hill’s quintessential corners, Bellevue and Mercer.

Harry’s Fine Foods, sharing the name of the corner market that stood there for years, opened over the weekend in a full rebuild of the old store. Plenty of the past remains.

Inside the new Harry’s — owner Julian Hagood calls the new project “bistro-esque” and “comfortable in the daytime but also sexy at night” — you’ll still find the old Harry’s cooler. The plan from Hagood and Alexa Dallas is for Harry’s Fine Foods to provide the neighborhood with a daytime cafe combined with a cornershop eventually stocking those day-to-day essentials like cigarettes and toilet paper.

The menu will be driven by what’s fresh. “We make up everything,” Hagood said. “It’s casual, produce-driven. We’re not reinventing anything. It’s delicious really well-made food.” What’s that mean? Great fries, for one. Hagood has built Harry’s on the back of his booming Lucullan Repast catering business along with a crowdsourced final boost. The catering venture will also now put the new kitchen at Harry’s to work.

The new project joins Cafe Barjot and the Lookout adding food and drink options to this particular elevation of I-5 Shores. Continue reading

As Harry’s Fine Foods finishes with Capitol Hill crowdfunded boost, Galerie 23 seeks $325K

Harry's Fine Foods is opening... soon (Image: CHS)

Harry’s Fine Foods is opening… soon (Image: CHS)

How much does it cost to open a “gourmet restaurant” on Capitol Hill? $325,000. More, actually. But that’s the total chef Rob Sevcik is looking to raise in a crowdfunding campaign to open Galerie 23 on Capitol Hill:

What I need is a sum of $325,000 dollars to purchase a local restaurant that is for sale. I have searched and searched and this opportunity is perfect. It is the right size, has the correct equipment and is located perfectly. I know I will be able to accomplish some truly amazing things with this space if contributors can help me achieve the purchase.

Sevcik’s “founders” won’t walk away empty handed, of course, for their act of generosity. The Thierry Rautureau protege will present his donors with equivalent gift cards and dinner experiences in return for their cold hard cash.

We heard back from Sevcik about his project but, at this point, can’t say what existing restaurant he has his eyes on. Plenty are available. Sevcik was originally looking at a space on E Pine in new development but tells CHS the price was out of his league. He’ll have his work cut out for him raising enough via the campaign. After about two weeks, he has around $2,300 of his goal pledged by backers. Continue reading

CHS Pics | ‘Wall’ mural remembers Orlando on Bellevue Ave E

A work in tribute to the victims and survivors of the Pulse nightclub shooting has become part of the streetscape at Bellevue and Mercer.

Artist Mariah Widman pasted up pieces of her “Wall” mural Sunday night. It represents the holes knocked out by police as they responded to rescue survivors in the deadly Orlando shooting in which a gunman killed 49 people and injured 53 more. The work represents the wall of Pulse as both a barrier that had to be breached and a symbol of resiliency, Widman said. Continue reading