Man found stabbed outside Harvard Market QFC

A man was found stabbed and bleeding outside Capitol Hill’s Harvard Market QFC early Sunday morning.

Seattle Fire and police were called to the scene just before 4 AM to a report of a male with multiple stab wounds to his arms outside the Harvard entrance to QFC near the upper parking lot, according to radio dispatches. Arriving medics found the man in his 20s with several puncture wounds and a deep laceration to his arms. He was rushed to Harborview for further treatment.

Police were investigating the incident and working to determine where the stabbing occurred. According to SPD dispatches, police were looking in the area of the parking lot near the Knights of Columbus building on Union a few blocks from where the victim was found. There was no suspect information broadcast and no immediate arrests.

Police were busy on Harvard for the second night this weekend. Early Saturday morning, police investigated gunfire in the parking lot above the QFC.

Police investigate Broadway/Pike gunfire

For the second weekend in a row, police pushed late night Capitol Hill crowds back inside area venues as officers responded to gunfire in the area.

Early Saturday just before 3 AM, shots rang out from the still busy parking lot above Broadway and Pike. People were seen running from the lot, according to a caller reporting the incident. According to police radio, officers arrived to find a mostly empty lot and three shell casings on the ground.

There was one report of a person who was shot being loaded into a vehicle but no victim was located near the scene. Police stopped a SUV that was reported leaving the lot but we don’t know if any arrests were made. A check of area hospitals was underway.

All information in this report is preliminary and has not yet been confirmed by SPD.

The late night gunfire follows an incident closer to 2 AM closing time last Saturday morning that brought out a huge police response as officers searched for a gunman in the Broadway parking lot behind Mud Bay and across the street from Neighbours. There were no immediate arrests in that incident.

With Alaska Airlines deal landed, ad agency opens office on E Pike


The ad agency Mekanism has joined the ranks of tech and creative agencies opening offices on Capitol Hill. This time, the music was part of the draw.

“We were just drawn to it,” said Mekanism partner Pete Caban. “The Capitol Hill area has a ton of history, a counter-culture pioneering vibe. A lot of it had to do with raw creative energy of the area.”

Mekanism officially launched its Capitol Hill office above E Pike and Broadway last month. The company is known for ad campaigns like Messin’ with Sasquatch. Caban says that while landing the Alaska Airlines account in January tipped the scales, the idea of opening up a brick-and-mortar office in the Northwest had been floated for some time. Continue reading

Nobody hurt, big police response after Broadway gunfire — UPDATE

There were no reported injuries early Saturday morning when a gunman opened fire in a Broadway parking lot across from the nightlife crowds of Neighbours and other nearby clubs just after 2 AM.

A huge SPD response filled blocks of Broadway with police cars and officers as police moved patrons inside nearby nightlife venues during the initial response to the gunfire. According to East Precinct radio dispatches, a male with a gun was reported around 2:15 AM in the parking lot behind the Mud Bay pet supply store in the 1500 block of Broadway. A report of shots fired followed.

All information in this report is preliminary and has not yet been confirmed by SPD. UPDATE 9:33 AM: SPD has posted a brief update on the incident:

There were no reported injuries early this morning on Broadway after officers heard several shots fired shortly after bar closing. Just before 2:15 am, Nightlife Emphasis officers working near Broadway and East Pine heard six to seven shots fired just to the north of them. As the officers rushed to investigate, they located a male fleeing the scene. He told officer that an unknown male shot at him and his friend for unknown reasons, but then the victim became uncooperative with the officers. Officers located six shell casings in the parking lot and did observe a broken window to a nearby apartment complex. Officers checked on the resident and determined that they were unharmed. Officers did not locate any injured people. Officers collected the evidence and continue to investigate.

Nobody was reported hit in the gunfire and officers cautiously looked for the suspect in the crowded parking lot. Police provided a limited suspect description via radio of a Middle Eastern male wearing all black but it wasn’t clear where the information had come from. Witnesses provided conflicting descriptions of where the gunman may have fled. Police identified a Mercedes at the scene that may have been associated with the man.

At least one window in the area was reported struck by gunfire.

CHS is not currently aware of any arrests in the incident.

Capitol Hill Champion seeks support for Denny festival street plan

Turns out, just because CHS calls something a festival street doesn’t make it an official City of Seattle festival street.

The Capitol Hill Champion group is drumming up community support for its push to convince the Seattle Department of Transportation powers that be — hi, Seth Geiser! — to officially designate the street for future festival purposes.

The city’s festival street program allows streets that aren’t considered vital arteries to be closed to traffic “for pedestrian-focused special events.” The newly one-way Denny already has already debuted as a quasi-festival street — most famously as host of the Capitol Hill Station grand opening celebration’s street fair.  Continue reading

CHS Re:Take | When cars ruled Broadway

McKale's, 1937 and 2016

McKale’s Super Service station at Broadway and Roy. The Seven Hundred Broadway Building today houses apartments over Roy Street Coffee and other businesses (1937: Washington State Archives; 2016: Rob Ketcherside)

Winning the War on Cars
There just aren’t as many gas stations as there used to be. The economics have changed. People drive less, cars use less fuel. I looked through the 1931 city directory. There were at least 33 gas stations on Capitol Hill back then. There were so many more no matter which way you drove: on Eastlake, on First Hill, in Madison Park, at Portage Bay, on Westlake. Today Capitol Hill, Broadway, Pike/Pine, heck you can go way out Madison and there are still only seven stations.

In 1990, the Seattle Times ran an article about a new law requiring gas stations to carry insurance against environmental damage. Before that law took effect, they reported there were already only half as many stations as in 1974. Even more closed afterwards.

And they keep disappearing. Recently I was going through my old photographs and found this look down at Pine and Broadway in 2000. I’ll be honest, I have no memory of this Chevron. I remember it as a lot surrounded by chain link and then at last the Walgreens and Capitol Hill Housing building we have now. (If you have better memory of the station, leave a comment!) I’m pretty sure the station at Pike and Broadway is living on borrowed time. The land is too valuable as a people-oriented use.

Broadway and Pine, 2000

Chevron gas station at Broadway and Pine, 2000. Full view here. (Photo: Rob Ketcherside)

Continue reading

Developers finally reach key milestone in Capitol Hill Station retail, housing project

Screen-Shot-2015-04-21-at-2.03.07-PM-600x7811-600x781Developers behind the retail and housing project that will surround Capitol Hill Station have reached a long awaited milestone towards starting construction.

CHS has learned that Gerding Edlen has signed an agreement with Sound Transit that lays out, among other things, the terms of a $25 million land lease for the project site along Broadway between E Denny Way and E John.

In March, a representative for the Portland-based developer told CHS the two sides were “really close” to signing a so-called term sheet. The preliminary agreement sets the terms for Gerding Edlen to lease three sites from Sound Transit and purchase the fourth, where Capitol Hill Housing will build an 86-unit affordable housing development.

“It took more than a year for them to negotiate the term sheet, in large part because structuring a lease instead of a purchase and sale proved complicated,” said Brie Gyncild of the Capitol Hill Champion, a community group that has worked for years to insert neighborhood priorities into the project.

Sound Transit has said the land was worth around $25 million and that Gerding Edlen was aiming for a 75-year deal to lease the properties. Continue reading

Garage, Capitol Hill’s pool hall and bowling alley, turns 20

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Garage’s original pool hall and 2003 bowling addition on the left. (Images: Garage)

Even before the first rounds of pool and bowling were played at Garage, ball games were essential to start of the Broadway bar and restaurant celebrating its 20th anniversary this month on Capitol Hill.

The first was a 1994 charity softball game where Alex Rosenast met Mike Bitondo. Rosenast, already a successful Seattle club owner, would later ask the inexperienced, recent college graduate to manage the new pool hall he was opening on Capitol Hill.

The second came eight years later with a pair fortunate seats at SafeCo Field. It was 2002 when Bitondo and Rosenast were sitting down at a Mariners game and realized the man sitting directly in front of them was the property owner of the building adjacent to the Garage, then just a restaurant and pool hall. Rumor had it the owner was preparing to sell the auto-row era building — then home to a fish tank wholesaler — to an office supply chain store. Continue reading

Driver cut from vehicle after smashing into Broadway delivery truck

(Image: SDOT)

(Image: SDOT)

Broadway might be one of the most complicated driving environments in Seattle. But that doesn’t mean people are slowing down.

Seattle Fire responded to a serious crash Thursday morning just after 8 AM involving an SUV that slammed into the back of a delivery truck in front of the Broadway Building at Broadway and Pine. Arriving SFD crews used hydraulic rescue tools to remove the injured driver from his vehicle. Witnesses reported the vehicle’s roof had to be completely cut away. A Seattle Fire spokesperson said the adult male victim was rushed to Harborview with what was described as serious injuries.

With the addition of an actives streetcar line to the street and its accompanying separated bikeway, Broadway’s lanes, markings, and lights make up a complicated driving environment. While we haven’t yet compiled statistics about collisions along Broadway, Thursday’s crash joins a few anecdotes showing that the busier street environment isn’t necessarily translating to calmer driver behavior. In March, two passengers and a driver were injured when he smashed a rented PT Cruiser into the back of a Metro bus while reportedly darting around traffic on a busy pre-commute Broadway. One of the three people in the car suffered life-threatening injuries, while two people on the bus were also injured. According to court records, no charges have been filed in that crash.

Council member O’Brien wants Central Co-op to anchor Capitol Hill Station development

Favorites-1-of-4-1-600x400Council member Mike O’Brien has made an unexpected endorsement, not for a political candidate, but for a Capitol Hill grocer.

In a letter to the developer of the four-site retail and housing project that will one day surround the Capitol Hill Station, the District 6 rep expressed his support for Central Co-op to become the development’s anchor tenant over Portland-based New Seasons Market. Both grocers are vying to occupy the future prominent retail space on Broadway, poised to be an extremely high-trafficked site given the thousands of light rail riders who are already moving through the block daily.

Members of the 16th and E Madison co-op announced in April to pursue a second location in the “transit orientated development” following reports that developer Gerding Edlen was in talks with New Seasons.

A group of labor organizations and Council District 3 rep Kshama Sawant previously voiced concerns about an “anti-union climate” at New Seasons stores. Citing Central Co-op’s early implementation of a $15 minimum wage and “spirit of sustainability,” O’Brien said the Capitol Hill-born grocer would be a better fit for the neighborhood.

“I was in the room when they announced their desire to pursue the TOD space,” O’Brien said in his letter. “I was inspired by the energy and excitement of hundreds of people, all of whom are owners of the business, turning their energy towards a common goal and vision.” Continue reading

Broadway Hill Park, last of its kind, now open on Capitol Hill

BroadwayHillPark- - 11

It just might be the last of its kind. The fences have come down around Broadway Hill Park, 12,000 square feet of grass, benches, community gardening space, and a sure to be popular BBQ grill in the middle of Capitol Hill. There may never be another.

Seattle Parks acquired the land at the corner for Federal and Republican in 2010 for $2 million after a townhome project slated for the property fell through. In the time since the project started, Parks has opened small greenspaces just off E Olive Way at the garden-filled, skateboard-popular Summit Slope Park and near 15th Ave at the sleepy Seven Hills Park. It also opened 12th Ave Square Park across from Seattle U, but even that woonerf-y paved square featuring sculptures and seating doesn’t appear to be the direction Parks will be taking for future Capitol Hill-area open spaces. Continue reading