Trial starts in 2012 stoplight shooting death of Capitol Hill QFC wine steward — UPDATE

UPDATE 11/19/2014 2:30 PM: Bowman, center, sits with his lawyers as the trial opened Wednesday with a dramatic statement from the prosecution. The defense, meanwhile, opted not to make an opening statement in the case.

UPDATE 11/19/2014 2:30 PM: Bowman, center, sits with his lawyers as the trial opened Wednesday with a dramatic statement from the prosecution. The defense, meanwhile, opted not to make an opening statement in the case.

UPDATE 11/19/2014 4:15 PM: A “student of murder” is how prosecutors described Thomasdinh Bowman in the dramatic opening statements in the trial against the man accused of killing Capitol Hill QFC wine steward Yancy Noll. The first degree murder trial got underway Wednesday afternoon in a court room packed with Noll’s family and friends.

While prosecutors initially called Bowman’s alleged actions a “thrill kill,” on Wednesday they painted Bowman, 31, as a calculated killer who studied how to get away with murder. Prosecutors described in graphic detail how Bowman allegedly fired four bullets into Noll’s head and face while both men sat in their cars at a north Seattle stoplight in August 2012.

“He left Yancy Noll dying in his car. Two hours later he was having dinner with his wife,” said senior deputy prosecuting attorney Adrienne McCoy.

Bowman faces a 20-30 year prison sentence, plus an additional five years for using a firearm. He was calm and emotionless through the proceedings, wearing a light blue sweater and neatly combed hair.

Defense attorney John Henry Browne opted not to make an opening statement on Wednesday. After the proceedings, Browne told CHS he may use a self-defense argument in the case.

The trial will resume on Thursday. Browne said the trial would likely end sometime in December.

Original Report: The Death Dealer’s Manual is a 100-page book first published in 1982 that describes in detail how to kill a person and (supposedly) how to get away with it. According to court documents, Thomasdinh Bowman studied the book and others like it before he allegedly shot and killed Capitol Hill QFC wine steward Yancy Noll in 2012.

Bowman allegedly pulled up beside the 43-year-old Noll at a stoplight at 15th Ave NE and 75th and shot him in the head with a 9mm pistol — a scenario prosecutors say was lifted play-by-play from the manual. Continue reading

Red Light Vintage, Aprie leaving Broadway

IMG_3391IMG_3384Signs announcing closing sales are up in the windows of neighboring Broadway thrift and fashion shops Red Light Vintage and Aprie as higher rents and trailing business prospects have conspired to execute a full turnover of the longtime tenants on this block of Capitol Hill. To the north, the former home of the Broadway Grill has been empty and tenant-less since spring of 2013.

(Image: Red Light Vintage)

(Image: Red Light Vintage)

CHS has not yet spoken with ownership of the stores but people familiar with the situation confirmed that both Red Light and Aprie will only have until early winter before moving on. Red Light and Aprie are owned by the same company. In the meantime, both are holding sales to clear out merchandise. It’s not clear what’s next for the spaces and we haven’t yet verified rumors of new tenants.

A check of permits shows no upgrades or tenant improvements currently planned for the building. The block’s three main components — the northern Terriyaki restaurant, the former Broadway Grill, and the Red Light/Aprie/Julia’s building –have three separate ownership groups at this time, according to county records.

It’s been a rough couple of months for Broadway fashion retail. Earlier this year, CHS reported on the closure of the Seattle outlet of the Tatyana Boutique chain. Its space one block north of Redlight remains empty. Tatyana ownership blamed a lack of Broadway shoppers for its failure on the street. We talked with Aprie’s buyers this summer about the boutique and the state of its business on Broadway. Aprie’s U District store has also shuttered.

Founded in 1996, the Red Light Vintage company will continue to operate its U District location and does a reportedly robust online business at redlightvintage.com. Acknowledged as the longest running thrift shop on Capitol Hill, it will leave behind a void in the vintage retail scene in the neighborhood. Saturday, a new venue will join the scene as Out of the Closet opens on E Pike.

Artist’s giant hands getting ready to join kissing jets in Capitol Hill Station

(Image: Josh Kelety for CHS)

(Image: Josh Kelety for CHS)

Forney's Crossed Pinkies will soon become part of the landscape along Broadway

Forney’s Crossed Pinkies will soon become part of the landscape along Broadway

"Here’s a photo of me re-drawing the “Walking Fingers” design for the West Entry," Forney writes. (Image: Ellen Forney with permission to CHS)

“Here’s a photo of me re-drawing the “Walking Fingers” design for the West Entry,” Forney writes. (Image: Ellen Forney with permission to CHS)

As Capitol Hill Station is racing toward completion, so is progress on the public art that will eventually call the structure home. Meet Ellen Forney: a local cartoonist, Capitol Hill resident, and professor at Cornish College of the Arts who has joined the effort to beautify and humanize the future station.

She says the project is a “zillion” times bigger than anything she’s ever done.

“The brush lines are going to be like these thick ropes,” Forney tells CHS. “I just can’t wait to see it. It makes me giddy.”

Forney has designed two massive murals to be displayed in the North and West entrances of the Sound Transit light rail station now under construction along Broadway. One is called “Crossed Pinkies” which is 40 feet long and 13 feet high, and will hang in the North entrance overlooking John Street. The other piece for the Broadway entrance, “Walking Fingers”, will be 20 feet by 28 feet.

Forney, originally from Philadelphia, has been a professional cartoonist illustrator since the early 1990s, and has dabbled in a variety of other artistic mediums since then. She landed the light rail station gig back in 2008 after submitting a series of paintings of hands in provocative positions to Sound Transit — paintings which had originally been featured in the 2007 Seattle Erotic Art Festival. The series was called Big Fucking Hands.

“I really like to be … suggestive, even explicit, but not necessarily graphic or representational. So even when the hands were doing very sexual things, it was just the hands,” says Forney. “Hands have so much personality.”

Walking Fingers will stand  20-feet high

Walking Fingers will stand 20-feet high

Continue reading

Health department fee hikes coming in 2015 — Market group worried small farmers will get squeezed out


The Seattle Farmers Market Association is calling for help from market shoppers to push back on a set of proposed King County Health fee increases that the group says may push away small farms and food processors:

This proposal stunned farmers market organizers who, like farmers, have been working in partnership with Public Health over the last several years to dramatically reduce violations at farmers markets, as well as Dept. staff time necessary at markets. Under the Public Health proposal, in 2015, the permit fee increase for each farmers market in King County will increase by 132%, and amounts to a more than ten-fold increase in the cost of fees paid by farmers markets just 3 years ago. Farmers and farmers markets alike are struggling to keep up with the escalating costs of doing business in King County. Continue reading

Capitol Hill infill fills in with seven stories on Boylston, four off Broadway

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The “site analysis” for the 1404 Boylston project is AWESOME and worth clicking to see a larger version (Image: S+H Works)

It will be a real-world lesson in neighborhood infill development — and the work of E Pike-based architect Hugh Schaeffer — as the East Design Review Board gathers Wednesday night to assess two proposed development projects that will create another 140 or so apartments on Capitol Hill in exchange for one two 1900s-built single family homes and a 1905-built, 8-unit apartment house.

(Image: S+H Works)

Coming soon to Boylston just off E Pike — seven stories (Image: S+H Works)

1404 Boylston
On Boylston just off E Pike, the Emerald City Manor building has provided a place to live on Capitol Hill since 1905. Today’s Hill calls for a bigger solution.

Planned as a seven-story affordable apartment building with 105 units that will replace the old manor, the developers of the Boylston Flats project promise some lofty goals –including helping to connect Capitol Hill to First Hill: Continue reading

Cornish celebrates 100 years of arts education on — and beyond — Capitol Hill

Cornish at Broadway and Pine, 1920 (Image: Webster & Stevens; PEMCO Webster & Stevens Collection, Museum of History & Industry, Seattle)

Cornish at Broadway and Pine, 1920 (Image: Webster & Stevens; PEMCO Webster & Stevens Collection, Museum of History & Industry, Seattle)

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Nellie Centennial Cornish (Image: Cornish College of the Arts, with permission to CHS)

On November 14th, 1914, so the story goes, Nellie Cornish stepped off a boat in Elliott Bay, walked up Capitol Hill, and opened a small music school in an office building at Broadway and Pine.

One hundred years later, Cornish’s school maintains its Capitol Hill presence, although significantly expanded and re-centered off the Hill across I-5. This week, Cornish College of the Arts will celebrate 100 years of providing arts education in Seattle. (Oddly enough, Cornish’s middle name was Centennial because she was born in 1876, the centennial anniversary of U.S. independence).

After opening in Broadway’s Booth Building (which continues to be used by Seattle Central College), Cornish quickly set her sites on expanding. Her school was so popular she had to hold classes in Odd Fellows Hall. Eventually, Cornish was able to raise enough money to build Kerry Hall in 1921 on the corner of Roy and Boylston. Today, the Mission-revival building is still used for music and dance instruction, as well as live performances in the small Poncho Theater. Continue reading

Tex-Mex Rooster’s to breathe new life into long-empty Broadway restaurant space

10574283_965377303477461_5293384855435848015_nA north Broadway restaurant and lounge space left charred and empty after a suspected arson fire three years ago this week will spring back to life in early 2015.

Rooster’s Bar and Grill is lined up to debut soon in the old Galerias space in the 600 block of Broadway E:

Rooster’s Bar & Grill is Seattle’s newest Tex Mex restaurant. Opening early 2015 by the creators of the original Bing’s in Madison Park.

CHS spoke to the project’s backer, Stan Moshier, earlier this year as he worked to prepare the old, burnt out Galerias space for a new tenant. At the time, Moshier, a once and (it turns out) future restaurateur, told us he wasn’t signed up to take the space. But it looks like plans have changed. Moshier also said the former Galerias space was large enough for multiple tenants — we’ll have to keep our eyes peeled for a Rooster’s neighbor.1800346_965290610152797_4481397077340197437_n Continue reading

Faces of Capitol Hill | Bear

(Image: Tim Durkan for CHS)

Bear had been homeless and a heroin addict for many years in the streets of Capitol Hill. Facing four years in prison for drug related crimes, he turned himself over to authorities earlier this year in hopes of “beating” the drug and getting his life back on track. He agreed to share his story and his picture with CHS. (Image: Tim Durkan for CHS)

Photographer Tim Durkan is a regular contributor to CHS. This is his first contribution in a new series on CHS dedicated to capturing the faces and the stories of people on Capitol Hill. You can view more of Durkan’s work at facebook.com/timdphotos.

Whole Foods coming to Capitol Hill in new development at Broadway and Madison

Site Plan (69)Whole_Foods_Market_logo.svgNational grocery chain Whole Foods Market has finally found its home on Capitol Hill.

The company announced it will open the 40,000 square-foot market in 2018 as part of a new 16-story apartment development planned for the 1000 block of Broadway near Madison.

It will be the ninth Whole Foods in Seattle, the company said.

“We have been interested in the Capitol Hill and First Hill communities or a long long time,” a company spokesperson tells CHS. “We couldn’t be more pleased about the location of the new store.”

In 2009, CHS reported on the Austin, Texas-cased company’s interest in Capitol Hill and rumors of a store opening on north Broadway.

The spokesperson said the 40,000 square-foot store qualifies as “extra medium” size in the spectrum of the company’s more than 400 markets around the world.

Continue reading

Capitol Hill Station retail and housing: $25M price tag, one developer drops out, plans due in December

We'll be seeing more proposals for the development around Capitol Hill Station soon. Here's one rendering from a past American Institute of Architecture Students project.

We’ll be seeing more proposals for the development around Capitol Hill Station soon. Here’s one rendering from a past American Institute of Architecture Students project.

Developers have finally submitted their proposals for the four sites that will make up the retail, housing, and community surrounding the Capitol Hill light rail station. Sound Transit says it is now reviewing plans submitted by the shortlisted teams. Officials must also decide if the four parcels should be developed separately, or if one firm will act as “master developer” for the 100,000 square feet “transit oriented development” that will include housing, commercial, and a community spaces. There’s also an official price tag now: $25 million.

Sound Transit’s initial property valuations were echoed by the agency’s outside analyst, which released a detailed appraisal of all five sites last week. The appraisals by Valbridge Property Advisors gives an interesting, albeit dry glimpse into the kind of work that goes on behind the scenes in the very early stages of planning many Capitol Hill developments.

In addition to considering constraints of the community development agreement, the appraiser evaluated how the neighborhood and transit-centered location would increase the property’s value. The report also analyzed nearby property sales:Screen Shot 2014-11-03 at 3.47.59 PM

In total, the four TOD properties were valued at $25 million. Here’s how the appraisals break down:

Site A: $9.1 million
Site B North: $2.8 million
Site B South: $6.2 million
Site C: $6.9 million

Continue reading

WANTED: SPD needs your help nailing Broadway sex toy bandit

Screen-Shot-2014-10-23-at-10.31.31-AM-141x300 (1)More than a month after his devious act, SPD detectives remain hot on the tail of the Broadway sex toy bandit — and are looking for your help putting the man behind the crime in a pair of non-GGG handcuffs. SPD posted this picture Monday of the thief they say stole more than $400 worth of stockings, lubricants and other personal items in a late September heist at Broadway sex emporium Castle Megastore:

SPD detectives are still in search of a man who fled a Capitol Hill adult emporium last month with $400 worth of stockings, lubricants and other personal items, and now police need your help identifying him. Detectives have a pic of the bawdy bandit, but don’t yet know his name. If you do, please call our detectives in the East Precinct Burglary/Theft Unit at (206) 684-5733.

CHS reported details of the heist here:

Just before 10:20 PM Saturday, SPD units were called to Broadway’s Castle Megastore after a man reportedly ran from the retailer carrying an armload of expensive sex toys. The man was last seen jumping into his white Chevy parked at the curb in front of the store and speeding off northbound with employees in pursuit.

 

Day of anti-police protests planned with marches on Capitol Hill’s East Precinct — UPDATE

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UPDATE 4:18 PM by Sumedha Majumdar: A group of about 30 protesters marched from Garfield with chants of “Hands up, don’t shoot” and “Being black is not a crime” before assembling in front of the East Precinct around 4 PM. “We the community will police the police,” one speaker said, addressing the crowd and the group of police officers assigned to the protest. Streets in the area were partially closed but the rally has been peaceful and there have been no arrests.

"We belong together. We wanna be the the best we can be for you but when you start breaching the law and breaking the law, we have to do something. We can't just turn a blind eye and I hate to tell you this but this is what I tell my kids. Just because you're Black doesn't give you the right to do something wrong and then jump up and say they did this because I'm Black. We need more people who understand what is going on in the Black community." -- East Precinct commander Capt. Pierre Davis, addressing the crowd

“We wanna be the the best we can be for you but when you start breaching the law and breaking the law, we have to do something. We can’t just turn a blind eye and I hate to tell you this but this is what I tell my kids. Just because you’re Black doesn’t give you the right to do something wrong and then jump up and say they did this because I’m Black. We need more people who understand what is going on in the Black community.” — East Precinct commander Capt. Pierre Davis, addressing the crowd

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Original report: The heartiest of activist souls will take to the drenched streets of Seattle’s Central District and Capitol Hill Wednesday afternoon and into the evening as part of protests against “police brutality and harassment of youth of color in Seattle.” The Garfield High School Black Student Union’s March for Ferguson begins at the 23rd Ave school at 3:30 PM. Organizers tell CHS the plan is to march to SPD’s East Precinct headquarters at 12th and Pine. Meanwhile, the annual October 22nd anti-police rally and march will again gather at Seattle Central starting at 5 PM and also is planned to include a march on the East Precinct. Continue reading

Metrix Create:Space celebrates five years of DIY tech on the Hill

"Soldering is easy" (Image: Metrix)

“Soldering is easy” (Image: Metrix)

(Image: Metrix)

(Image: Metrix)

Most of the year you can walk the north end of Broadway barely hearing a peep from Metrix Create:Space – a DIY haven for robotic tinkering — outside of the occasional churning of machines and project chatter but last Friday  the business celebrated its fifth anniversary of being with a rambunctious crowd of makers, geeks and the people who love them filling the subterranean space.

Illuminated with green laser tubes — and free booze — the crowd included Boeing and Google employees, the DIY techs, students and a couple of noobs.

“I’ve met a lot of really great people… seeing them through a portion of their life, being a part of that is the most rewarding thing,” owner Matt Westervelt said. Over the past five years he’s seen a shift from clientele simply exploring, to those utilizing the space as a work station while at the same time promoting exploration and learning. Continue reading