With buyer lined up, 15th Ave’s Patrick J. Sullivan House to be considered as landmark

The house in 1905 (Image: Seattle of Today Architecturally)

The nearly 120-year-old house at the corner of 15th and E Olive hit the market last month just in time, we joked, for Halloween. Listed at $2.2 million, the property is also a prime candidate for redevelopment. Before anything moves forward, the old Patrick J. Sullivan house will get its turn to be considered for landmarks protections:

Landmarks Preservation Board to consider nomination of P.J. Sullivan House for landmark status

SEATTLE (November 22, 2017) – Seattle’s Landmarks Preservation Board will consider nomination of the P.J. Sullivan House in Miller Park located at 1632 15th Avenue on Wednesday, December 20 at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be held in Seattle City Hall (600 4th Avenue, Floor L2) in the Boards & Commissions Room L2-80.

The public is invited to attend the meeting and make comments regarding the nomination. Written comments should be received by the Landmarks Preservation Board at the following mailing address by 3:00 p.m. on December 19:
Seattle Landmarks Preservation Board
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
PO Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649

The property is currently listed as pending according to real estate records. The nomination packet was prepared by Castanes Architects but there is no indication of what any new buyer has planned for the property.

December will be a busy time for old Hill buildings potentially facing demolition. On December 6th, the landmarks board will consider Broadway’s 1960s-era Bonney Watson Funeral Home as an official landmark. CHS reported here on the unsuccessful first design review of the twin seven-story mixed-use apartment buildings destined to rise on the coveted funeral home property.

The full 1632 15th Ave nomination packet is below. Continue reading

Attention Capitol Hill QFC shoppers who carry reusable bags while shopping…

Last Drinks with Donna Summer

While you’re finishing shopping for your Friendsgiving feast, be aware of this note just sent to CHS from QFC HQ about upcoming changes:

Beginning late next week, customers at our QFC stores may notice some new signage asking them to only use shopping carts or hand baskets while shopping in our stores. With our busy stores, especially during the holidays, we want to ensure that all of our customers have a pleasant and easy shopping experience. At times, the process of unloading and reloading reusable bags at the register slows down the checkout process and causes delays.

The spokesperson tells CHS that the Ohio-based grocery chain is “not the only retailer to implement this change.” We asked if “lost prevention” was also a factor in the decision. “There are other benefits to this policy,” the spokesperson said, “but the main reason is customer convenience.”

Now you’ll just need to find an unused basket or cart. Good luck.

The move follows some more customer experience streamlining after QFC stores on Capitol Hill shifted from 24-hour operations to closing at 1 AM earlier this year.

UPDATE: E Madison’s Central Co-op weighs in: “We do prefer that people use shopping carts and baskets instead of shopping into their personal re-useable bags. It helps to prevent confusion at the registers.”

 

Capitol Hill Station sniffs 7,000 boardings a day as ridership continues to climb

Walking Fingers by Ellen Forney

Sound Transit’s annual light rail ridership rose around 13.5% through September — about 10% of the 72,000 additional daily boardings across the system’s 16 stops happened at Broadway’s Capitol Hill Station.

Overall, third quarter boarding totals show Capitol Hill Station’s 2017 jump of 13.4% pretty much mirrors the full system’s rise:

Link light rail ridership continued its strong growth during the third quarter, with a 13.5% increase compared to the same period last year. Average weekday boardings were 76,821, a 13.5% increase compared to the third quarter of 2016. The Angle Lake extension opened the last weekend of the third quarter in 2016. The continued increase in ridership and average weekday boardings is attributed to the two service expansions in 2016 as well as the addition of the Angle Lake Garage with more than 1,100 parking stalls. The region has enthusiastically adopted Link as a convenient transportation choice.

According to Sound Transit’s just released quarterly ridership report (PDF), around 6,953 people board trains below Broadway every weekday — up by about 800 per day from 2016.

Not every piece of data in the set is good news for the system, however. Boardings at Sea-Tac were down more than 13% in the period. UPDATE: Sound Transit attributes the drop to the new nearby Angle Lake Station:

Sound Transit won’t have a enough history for full year over year annual Broadway-boosted comparisons until 2018 — Capitol Hill Station debuted in March 2016 and immediately helped jolt light rail ridership to “record” numbers.

 

Planning for Seattle AIDS Memorial begins at center of Capitol Hill Station plaza

The Capitol Hill Station plaza is set to be a new center of activity on the north end of Cal Anderson Park. Its center will include a memorial to those lost to the AIDS crisis — including park namesake Cal Anderson, Washington’s first openly gay legislator who died of “acquired immune deficiency syndrome” in 1995 at the age of 47.

The Seattle AIDS Legacy Memorial group is working to fund and create the monument.

“We’re thrilled to be able to connect the history of the neighborhood to be centrally located where all Seattleites tend to come,” said Paul Feldman of SALM. “We’re hopeful, through careful planning and careful engagement, that we’ll hear stories we’ve never heard before and we’ll make clear to visitors that there’s still much work to do.”

Most of the details will be decided in the months ahead as the plaza and the surrounding developments move forward toward a possible late 2019 opening, but the SALM group will call for artists in the coming months. Finalists will be asked to offer specific design proposals fitting the following requirements: create a place of reflection and remembrance, provide a call to action, tell the history of King County’s AIDS crisis in the 1980s and 90s, the lessons that came with it, and the diverse community responses.

Artists must also make the installation prominent, visible to passersby, mostly outside, accessible to convenient public transportation, easily maintained, accessible to the disabled, wifi-abled and powered. One important consideration when choosing the artist is that, although the plan spans three spots joining the plaza, the Nagle and Denny festival streets and the northern edge of Cal Anderson, it’s clearly one project. During the design review process, some community members suggested plaques honoring those who died including Anderson.

While Cal Anderson Park honors the late politician by name, there is no permanent marker in the area acknowledging his history. In 2012, a temporary portrait of Anderson was unveiled on the giant wall that surrounded the Capitol Hill Station construction site.

The plaza — by necessity due to legal requirements and the physics of construction over an underground light rail facility — is somewhat of a blank slate planned for community activity. The four buildings that make up the surrounding developments will create more than 400 affordable and market-rate apartment units and 59,000 square feet of commercial and community space, and more than 200 new parking spaces below ground for residents and shoppers. Continue reading

Man hit in arm, another arrested in Broadway parking lot shootout — UPDATE

One man was shot and another was taken into custody after at least 27 shots were fired inside a 1500 block Broadway parking structure early Sunday morning, SPD reports:

Detectives are investigating after a man was shot in the arm early Sunday morning on Capitol Hill.

Officers on patrol in the 1500 block of Broadway just before 4 a.m. Sunday morning heard multiple gunshots coming from a nearby parking garage. Officers quickly converged on the area and saw multiple cars leaving the area.

Witnesses began calling 911 and reporting that some people in a Chevy Tahoe may have been involved. Officers spotted that vehicle leaving the area and stopped it. The officers noticed bullet damage to the SUV and saw a handgun on the floorboard. The passenger, a convicted felon and prohibited from possessing a firearm, admitted to owning the gun. Officers placed the man in custody and booked him into King County Jail for the firearms violation. Officers impounded the Tahoe for further investigation.

While investigating, a man arrived at Harborview Medical Center with a gunshot wound to the arm, in a vehicle that was seen by witnesses fleeing the shooting scene. Officers spoke with the shooting victim and released him pending additional investigation.

Officers collected 27 shell casings of varying calibers from the garage. Homicide/Assault detectives will be conducting follow-up investigation as this case moves forward

According to East Precinct radio reports, one witness told police the gunfire broke out as around 50 people were fighting around 3:30 AM in the lower Harvard Market parking lot below the QFC at Broadway and Pike. Police arrived to find some fleeing on foot and reports of two vehicles speeding from the scene south on Broadway. A Chevy Tahoe described by witnesses matched the description of a vehicle involved in an earlier disturbance in the area, according to SPD radio. That SUV was stopped again at a First Hill gas station as police searched the area following the shooting. Police took one person from the vehicle into custody for a firearms violation.

Inside the parking structure, police found multiple shell casings and a nearly full .45 caliber magazine. Officers also found a large amount of blood in a stairwell and began sending units to nearby hospitals, according to SPD radio. The male with the gunshot wound arrived at Swedish First Hill minutes later and told staff he had been shot on Capitol Hill, according to radio dispatches.

Sunday morning’s shooting followed another Saturday afternoon at a 23rd Ave car wash in which shots were fired but fortunately there were no injuries reported.

Meanwhile, this is the third year in a row for a pulse of gun violence around Capitol Hill in November. In 2015, five people were injured in a drive-by shooting outside the QFC at Broadway and Pike. In 2016, 31-year-old Jacob Osborne-Bash was murdered in a shooting at 13 and Olive. That crime remains unsolved.

Two big items on Sound Transit’s agenda for lots of affordable housing on Broadway, First Hill — UPDATE

UPDATE 3:35 PM: The Sound Transit board approved both motions Thursday afternoon paving the way for a “no cost” transfer of two First Hill properties to nonprofit developers Bellwether Housing and Plymouth Housing and, in the second vote, putting in place a memorandum of understanding between the transit agency, Seattle Central, and Capitol Hill Housing for a swap of Capitol Hill properties. Details on the plans are below.

In public comments, Bellwether’s CEO Susan Boyd called the joint proposal with Plymouth “a bold plan” that will create much needed affordable housing on First Hill.

Board member and Seattle City Council member Rob Johnson called the First Hill proposal “very consistent with what the community asked for” and said the neighborhood’s “YIMBY” spirit was reflected in the plan.

King County Executive Dow Constantine said affordable housing is now central to Sound Transit’s mission as it also works to provide transit to the region’s growing population. Pierce County Executive Bruce Dammeier, meanwhile, voted against the motion saying he was troubled by the “no cost” aspect of the plan as a “dangerous precedent.”

Additionally, the board also approved a motion on a plan for “Central Transit-Oriented Development” near the Roosevelt light rail station that will involve Bellwether and Mercy Housing Northwest.

Original report: Sound Transit’s board is scheduled to make two key decisions on property it owns across First Hill and Capitol Hill that will potentially open the way for big deals around affordable housing and and expanded Seattle Central.

The Sound Transit Board will vote Thursday whether to move forward with two land deals.

One motion paves the way negotiate with Plymouth Housing and Bellwether Housing in a purchase of Sound Transit land at 1014 Boylston Ave and 1400 Madison meant for high-rise affordable housing, up to 160 feet.

“We thought in viewing their proposal that their numbers were reasonable,” said Sarah Lovell from Sound Transit. “It is an expensive project. It’s expensive to build a high-rise. But stacking two housing project increases their ability to get subsidies. They’re trying to be really efficient with their design.” Continue reading

Plan would turn Seattle Central property at Broadway and Pine into homeless youth facility, housing

(Image: CHS)

Thanks to the watchful eye of Representative Frank Chopp (D-34), a Seattle Central College building at Broadway and Pine will likely turn into a hub of homeless youth services and, hopefully, a new apartment development replacing one of Broadway’s last surface parking lots.

Last winter, the college put out notice that they were seeking development partners for two Broadway properties. Per the law, public agencies are required to publicize it first to other government agencies. That’s when it came across Chopp’s desk.

“We did a tour of the site a while ago and it clearly is an ideal site for it,” Chopp tells CHS. “If you look at where the homeless youth congregates, it’s in Capitol Hill and the U District.” Continue reading

Ramen Hill: A brief tour of Capitol Hill’s ramen goodness

The recipe that has peaked the summit of Ramen Hill has some recurring ingredients: A legendary Japanese ramen house brings its proprietary broth recipe and one of a kind noodles to America, usually through a subsidiary or franchise, with one of its first if not only locations right here on Capitol Hill. Other recipes — like tiny Ooink — are entirely unique. But the trend is undeniable — Capitol Hill is now filled with ramen.

By CHS’s count, only four new Japanese noodle places have opened up on Capitol Hill in the past year. But with a small wave of openings in recent years, we have now reached a point that must be near broth saturation point. Below, join us for a brief tour of the newest slurp-y goodness now available to warm your rainy days on the Hill. Continue reading

Man suffers burns in incident outside Broadway drugstore

A man was burned and taken to the hospital Friday morning after reportedly setting himself on fire in front of businesses at Broadway and E Olive Way.

Seattle Police units were the first to arrive at the corner around 8:30 AM to a report that the man was on fire. Seattle Fire arrived as SPD was assisting the man. According to a department spokesperson, Seattle Fire paramedics rushed the man to Harborview for treatment of burns. He was reported in stable condition. Continue reading

Two days, two pedestrians hit on Capitol Hill streets

A pedestrian was injured after being struck by a driver Thursday afternoon at Broadway and John, a Capitol Hill intersection already targeted for safety improvements due to recent collisions and close calls and increased activity in the area around Capitol Hill Station.

Seattle Fire and police were called to the busy intersection just after 1:30 PM to the reported collision. According to Seattle Fire, the person who was struck was being transported to Harborview. We should know more about the patient and their condition soon. UPDATE: SFD tells us the person struck was an adult female who was transported to Harborview in stable condition. A witness report via Facebook said the woman may have suffered pelvic injuries. Continue reading