Pictures from the crowd: Capitol Hill Pride 2017


Seattle Pride 2017 will be remembered for the record heat that nearly melted Sunday’s parade — and an important protest that briefly brought it to a halt. It should also be remembered for a rekindled Pride presence on Capitol Hill with new organizers pumping life into Saturday’s Broadway street festival while on-Hill Pride weekend traditions like Saturday night’s Dyke March still contined strong and other elements like Trans* Pridealready in its fifth year! — drew huge crowds. Here is a look at the fun and messages from Capitol Hill Pride via the viewfinders and mobile devices of festival goers, dancers, doggie drag friends, and more. Thanks for sharing your pictures and videos. Continue reading

Seattle has competing plans for two June 11th Pride Marches — both on Capitol Hill

Seattle-Dyke-March-2015-15 (3)

The Seattle Dyke March, so far, faces no competition in 2017 (Image: CHS)

There are currently two competing plans for a June 11th Seattle “sister march” in conjunction with the 2017 National Pride March in Washington D.C. And both are being planned for Capitol Hill.

Organizers of the Broadway-centered Capitol Hill Pride Festival are protesting a decision by Seattle PrideFest to hold a march planned to start in Cal Anderson on June 11th along with marches expected to take place in cities across the country. The Broadway festival organizers say their plans for the same date starting on Broadway have been in motion since January: Continue reading

Seattle’s March for Science will start on Capitol Hill

A message from January's Womxn's March (Image: CHS)

A message from January’s Womxn’s March (Image: CHS)

Cal Anderson’s role as a center of protest against the Trump administration will continue and Earth Day 2017 will take on even greater meaning as the Seattle component of the nationwide March for Science will start in the Capitol Hill park:

March For Science – Seattle

The march will gather in Cal Anderson on Earth Day morning April 22nd before stepping off for a journey to the Seattle Center’s International Fountain.

“Science is the best method we have for understanding the world. It should be an open process, used to serve all people,” organizers write. “If you wish to support those aims, please join us and march to support it.”

Seattle has been an enthusiastic participant in a series of marches and protests coordinated to demonstrate resistance to the social and economic policies pursued by President Trump. In January, the massive Womxn’s March stretched from the Central District to the Seattle Center and included more than 120,000 people in its ranks. Also that month, an immigration rights protest marched across Capitol Hill. In February, Cal Anderson hosted an LGBTQ solidarity rally. More spontaneous protests in the wake of the election have also crossed the Hill. In March, Black Lives Matter marchers crossed the Central District. In the midst of it all, victories — here and there — have been struck in the courts and some have been inspired to step forward into new roles to help build resistance.

Now, for Earth Day and in response to Trump policies seeking to erode progress on slowing climate change, Seattle will take a scientific approach to speaking up for the environment.

 

Half price books: Hugo House offered space in new development below market value

(Image: Weinstein A+U)

(Image: Weinstein A+U)

Hoping to continue their long relationship with the literary-focused nonprofit, property owners of the under-construction, mixed-use development on 11th Ave and E Olive have offered to sell the nonprofit Hugo House a 10,000 square-foot ground floor space for about half of its estimated market value.

Hugo House, which is temporarily located at 1021 Columbia, made its home in the 1902-built former mortuary at 11th Ave and E Olive until its demolition last June.

The nonprofit has intended to move into the new development since plans were announced in 2014, but the below market price offer to sell the space to Hugo House is an unexpected opportunity. Continue reading

Seattle Parks study next step in flipping switch on safer Cal Anderson lighting

By Tim Kukes for CHS

Capitol Hill’s central park, Cal Anderson already has another busy summer of upgrades ahead in 2017. A $50,000 study included in this year’s city budget will also help set the stage for the next big upgrade for the 14-year-old park — new, more efficient, and safer lighting.

“One of the key things for Capitol Hill where you have 80% of the population as renters living in apartments – they don’t have backyards necessarily to enjoy,” Joe Sisolak, sustainability and planning director for Capitol Hill Housing, tells CHS.  “Cal Anderson Park is the backyard for Capitol Hill. It is a critical space that a lot of people share.”

The Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce and the Cal Anderson Park Alliance have been advocating for that backyard to be a safer place at night. Part of that means improved lighting. Continue reading

How you can help Hugo House return to Capitol Hill

Hugo House, these days, operates in exile on First Hill as construction continues on the six-story, mixed-use apartment building on the corner the writing center is slated to return to when the project opens in 2018. But state money lined up to help Hugo House return to Capitol Hill and pay for its new home is still a question mark, is an unfinished story er, might go to some other worthy project… here, let’s let somebody better with words handle this. Here is a call for support from Hugo House director Tree Swenson:

Please help Hugo House realize a long-held dream to have a permanent facility of our own! We have been recommended for a grant from Washington State through the Building for the Arts program. This funding is critical. However, the State has many funding needs this year, and this grant is far from assured. As a friend to Hugo House, we know you understand that the arts matter. You can make a big difference by contacting your State legislators to let them know why you think it’s important to have public support for a new and permanent home for Hugo House. Below is an example of a note to legislators with a brief statement about why Hugo House matters. Your own words are even more important, but any contact helps. Please take a minute right now to call or email. Time is short; the budget is in progress. You can find your State legislators and their contact information here.

For those of you in the 43rd, you’ll want to fire up your email machine for jamie.pedersen@leg.wa.gov, frank.chopp@leg.wa.gov, and nicole.macri@leg.wa.gov.

Here is somebody else good with them words at the Seattle Review of Books to help inspire you:

You can find a sample email and a link to a site that will tell you who represents you in the state legislator right here. If you’ve bemoaned the loss of important institutions during the Seattle real estate boom, this is your chance to speak out, to ensure that one piece of Seattle that’s been around for decades continues to have a new life in the decades to come. Go make yourself heard.

In 2018, Hugo House is slated to return to Capitol Hill in a new 10,000 square-foot writing center on the ground floor of the six-story apartment building under construction at the site of its longtime home at 11th and E Olive St. The new new center will include six classrooms, offices, two performance spaces, and space for writers to, um, write.

The interim Hugo House is located at 1021 Columbia. You can learn more at hugohouse.org.

CHS Pics | In another weekend of resistance energy, hundreds march on Broadway

There was a time — only three weeks ago — when it might have felt less imperative to regularly take to the streets in protest:

One of the great achievements of free society in a stable democracy is that many people, for much of the time, need not think about politics at all. The president of a free country may dominate the news cycle many days — but he is not omnipresent — and because we live under the rule of law, we can afford to turn the news off at times. A free society means being free of those who rule over you — to do the things you care about, your passions, your pastimes, your loves — to exult in that blessed space where politics doesn’t intervene. In that sense, it seems to me, we already live in a country with markedly less freedom than we did a month ago. It’s less like living in a democracy than being a child trapped in a house where there is an abusive and unpredictable father, who will brook no reason, respect no counter-argument, admit no error, and always, always up the ante until catastrophe inevitably strikes. This is what I mean by the idea that we are living through an emergency.

For anyone on Capitol Hill feeling resistance fatigue, here is the good news. Around 400 marchers rallied Saturday in Cal Anderson to show solidarity for LGBTQ people amid threats from the Trump administration before traveling and blocking Broadway to protest in front of the neighborhood’s Wells Fargo branch to challenge the bank’s financing of the Dakota Access pipeline. If you weren’t there, those people had your back for the weekend. Others will hopefully be there until you are ready to march or protest or write letters again. Continue reading

LGBTQ solidarity rally at Cal Anderson, ‘2-17-17 General Strike’ gathering in Volunteer Park

Some of the signs from a November protest at Cal Anderson Park -- still applicable

Some of the signs from a November protest at Cal Anderson Park — still applicable

Capitol Hill parks continue to play important roles in Seattle’s anti-Trump activities. Saturday, activists have organized a LGBTQ Solidarity Rally Seattle in Cal Anderson:

Trump’s administration has begun an attack on marginalized and oppressed people across the broad spectrum of humanity. We are going to peacefully demonstrate on Saturday, February 11th, at 1030AM as an act of solidarity with those who have been impacted. In his first month in office, Trump has issued executive orders and proposed nominees which stand against fundamental human rights including a Muslim Ban, reallocating federal resources to start construction of a wall with Mexico, and restarting an attack on Oceti Sakowin land for the Dakota Access Pipeline. We have already heard and seen proposals for executive orders which would grant so-called “religious liberty” to discriminate against LGBTQ people and target those seeking abortions and other family planning services. In addition, it is clear there is speculation on national Right to Work legislation destroying our already-under-attack unions.

Saturday will bring an activism double header of sorts, with groups also planning to target the Wells Fargo branch inside the Broadway Market with a “No DAPL” boycott rally.

16402970_1670106883281821_960711515827668356_oMeanwhile, the following weekend will bring more rallying to the Hill as groups are planning to meet at Volunteer Park’s amphitheater as part of a planned nationwide general strike against the Trump administration on Friday, February 17th:

Solidarity Demonstration to #Resist the WA Senate Republican proposal to fund education by undermining collective bargaining rights of Education Workers. All Labor Unions are welcome and encouraged to stand in support of this Legislative attack on Unions. No Right to Work in Washington.

CHS Pics | Katy Perry’s Capitol Hill disco ball

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(Images: Joshua Lewis for CHS)

Calling all champion Easter egg hunters and pop music enthusiasts — Katy Perry has launched a worldwide hunt for disco balls teasing her new single “Chained to the Rhythm.”

CHS decided to play along and found a disco ball in Cal Anderson Park chained to a bench by the reflecting pool Wednesday morning.

People walked by the disco ball looking at it, and a few stopped to plug in their headphones and listen to the snippet of the single scheduled to be released in full on Friday. Continue reading

CHS Pics | Reflections of home, change, survival in student artwork on display on Cal Anderson Gatehouse

With reporting and photography by Lisa Hagen Glynn

The “windows” above the reflecting pool of the landmark reservoir gatehouse in Cal Anderson Park are displaying artwork from local middle school kids that provides one answer to the threats coming out of the White House so far in 2017. But for the students, the images unveiled at a ceremony Saturday reflecting on “feelings of home, forces that create change, and survival” are personal.

“She’s cutting herself to feed her baby. It’s showing how a mom loves her kids…. My mom does a lot of things for me,” Natanim said about her panel. “Even though she doesn’t tell me, I know that she does.”

The artwork from Washington Middle School students will be on display through May as part of a collaboration between the Seattle Office of Arts and Culture and Seattle Parks and Recreation’s Out of School Time program at Washington’s S Jackson campus. Continue reading