Community market stand small part of patching big hole with 23rd and Jackson Red Apple closure

(Image: Clean Greens)

When the Central District Red Apple closed this month as Vulcan readies plans to redevelop the store’s corner of 23rd and Jackson, residents of the CD lost a community resource and one of the only big grocery markets in the area. Lottie Cross, the director of Clean Greens, a nonprofit market stand and CSA, and 55-year resident of the Central District, came to the rescue. Providing no-pesticide, herbicide-free collard greens, potatoes, tomatoes, cantaloupe, pumpkins, sweet corn, and many other vegetables, Clean Greens is filling a small part of the big hole left by Red Apple’s closure.

“They (Vulcan) came to me,” Cross tells CHS. “Last Saturday was our first day in the new location — we sold way more than usual. At least 50 people stopped by and almost bought us out.”

Formerly located at New Hope Missionary Baptist Church on Saturdays, the Clean Green market stand now pops up across the parking lot from the old Red Apple, near the Walgreens. According to Cross, Vulcan partnered with Clean Greens to provide access to healthy food “for as long as possible.” It’s up to the weather to decide how long the stand is there, but Cross expects to have a presence through December, and maybe after.

Cross tells CHS that any leftover vegetables go to Operation Sack Lunch, a nonprofit that provides free vegetarian meals throughout Seattle. Vulcan supplies a tent, and funding for one person to run the market stand, but other than that, it’s a purely volunteer organization. The purchase of seeds, the lease, and payment for their farm manager, Tommie Willis, comes from money raised through the CSA program, which runs from July to October. Continue reading

Plans for Africatown Plaza rise at 23rd and Union

Garrett, center, with Forterra’s Michelle Connor and Chris Persons of Capitol Hill Housing (Image: Africatown Plaza)

The newly formed Africatown Community Land Trust entered an agreement with Capitol Hill Housing and Lake Union Partners, the Seattle development company that bought the Midtown Center block in May. The announcement cements the project surrounding Lake Union’s $23.25 million deal to purchase the Central District shopping center land.

UPDATEWe have updated this information to correct an error regarding ownership of the site.

“We’re working to maintain fertile ground where a Black community that has been here for over 130 years can grow and thrive in place, K. Wyking Garrett, president of the land trust, said in an announcement of the agreements. Continue reading

Two-car shootout sends bullets flying along MLK and Cherry

A shootout involving two vehicles and reports of around 30 shots fired sent a bullet through a school window and left students at area schools sheltering in place Tuesday morning along MLK Way and E Cherry.

Police were called to the area near Powell Barnett Park around 11:45 AM to a report of 20 or so gunshots coming from two vehicles. The crime scenes quickly multiplied as reports came in of bullets striking an E Cherry market and the nearby NOVA High School where bullet fragments broke a window, according to East Precinct radio dispatches.

According to the SPD brief on the incident, there were no injuries reported:

Witnesses began calling 911 just after 11 a.m. to report gunfire near Powell Barnett Park.  When officers arrived they spoke with the witnesses who said the occupants of two vehicles, possibly two grey sedans, were firing shots at each other. They said the cars continued to travel through the area, eventually going westbound on East Cherry Street. The witnesses said both cars sped away before police arrived. Officers found property damage to a nearby high school. No one was injured and there is no indication any students were involved in the incident.

Three public schools — NOVA, Garfield High, and Leschi Elementary — were ordered to shelter in place during the incident, according to radio dispatches.

According to the latest SPD statistics, reported gunfire incidents are up slightly in 2017 with incident concentrated toward South Seattle.

SPD said they are continuing to investigate Tuesday’s shootout. If you have information that could help, call the SPD non-emergency line at (206) 625-5011.

Wednesday, meanwhile, the national Coffee with a Cop Day brings East Precinct representatives to the 23rd and Jackson Starbucks.

Guilty plea in Ingrid Lyne murder case

Ingrid Lyne via Facebook

The man accused of murdering and dismembering Ingrid Lyne and disposing of parts of her body in recycling bins in a Central District neighborhood has pleaded guilty to the grisly 2016 crime.

John Charlton pleaded guilty to first-degree murder Monday morning, the Seattle Times reports.

UPDATE: Here is a statement from the King County Prosecutor on the guilty plea:

John R. Charlton, 38, pled guilty this morning as charged to Murder in the First Degree for the murder of Ingrid Lyne, 40, in April 2016. The defendant also pled guilty to a charge of Theft of a Motor Vehicle for the theft of Lyne’s automobile. The defendant killed the victim and dismembered her body. Her remains were later found in Seattle.

The defendant faces a sentence range of 250 to 333 months in prison. King County Prosecutors will be recommending a top of the range sentence of 333 months. Charlton is scheduled for sentencing for January 5 at 1 p.m. before Judge Julie Spector in courtroom E-815 of the King County Courthouse.

“Our community was shocked by the senseless murder of Ingrid Lyne,” said King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg. “We have charged the most serious crimes we could under the law, and now that this defendant has pled guilty, we will be recommending the maximum prison sentence,” he added.

Charlton, 38, faced a January 2018 trial in the case in which he had pleaded not guilty after being arrested and charged in the murder in the spring of 2016.

Charlton now faces nearly 30 years in prison for killing the 40-year-old Swedish Medical Center nurse and mother inside her Renton home, stealing her car, and dumping her remains in at least two Central District recycling bins.

Seattle Police arrested Charlton in Lake Stevens for Lyne’s murder after a homeowner near 21st and Pine had discovered parts of her body in a recycling bin.

The 1600 block of 21st Ave, where Lyne’s body parts were found, appeared to have only been a random stop for Lyne’s killer and police said that Charlton had no other connection to the neighborhood.

KHUH, Central District radio, hits the air

With a track featuring “broken keyboard playing random notes w/ frogs in the woods,” a project three years in the making has crackled to life over the airwaves of the Central District. Tuesday, KHUH, 104.9 FM, officially began broadcasting as a “low power” radio station.

E Union’s Community-run Hollow Earth Radio powers the station with a schedule of eclectic and local music as well as neighborhood current affairs and issues. You can also continue to listen to HER online at hollowearthradio.org.

CHS first covered the plans for a micro-wave of micro-broadcasters to join the Seattle airwaves and secure low power FM broadcast permission from the FCC while deploying new broadcasting towers and equipment back in September 2014. A quest to raise $25,000 to launch the station was completed successfully last year.

Though the Hollow Earth community broadcasts have been available online for a decade, those involved with the station said the FM signal was import to reach neighbors without access to computers and that the low power station’s launch would also be a symbolic victory for alternative radio broadcasting.

KHUH will share the Central District and nearby radio dial with Seattle University which launched its own low power FM station in February 2016 on KXSU, 102.1 FM.

With the right twiddling of knobs and careful antenna alignment, you might be able to pick up either station around Capitol Hill — though some will experience an interesting mash-up, of sorts, as Tacoma hip-hop station KUBE also bleeds through at 104.9 FM.

Hollow Earth is volunteer-run and community-backed. You can learn more at hollowearthradio.org.

Capitol Hill Community Post | Youth, Artists Rally for Equity from Vulcan, Paul Allen

From the Artist Coalition for Equitable Development

Youth, Artists Re-envision Paul Allen’s Plans for the Central District at Rally, Showcase Tuesday, Sept. 19th 

SEATTLE, WA (Sept. 19th, 2017)- On Tuesday afternoon from 4-7pm, the Artist Coalition for Equitable Development (ACED) is announcing its launch with “Degentrify & Inspire” – a youth-lead pop-up press conference, rally, and showcase outside of Vulcan headquarters at Chinatown/ID Station. The coalition of over 70 urban arts entities will be delivering five community commitments to Vulcan Real Estate, the Paul Allen-owned company set to redevelop significant portions of the historically-redlined Central District along the Yesler-Jackson corridor in upcoming years.  Continue reading

Grocer New Seasons coming to the Central District at 23rd and Union

Another domino has finally clicked into place in the massive grocery cart shuffle game playing out in major developments across Capitol Hill and the Central District. As expected, Portland-based New Seasons has announced it will, indeed, be anchoring the Lake Union Partners-backed project on the northwest corner of 23rd and Union.

“The Central District is such a wonderful neighborhood, rich in history and culture. We are honored to join and serve this community,” New Seasons CEO Wendy Collie said in an announcement on the project Friday morning. “As a neighborhood grocer, we pride ourselves on creating gathering places that honor and reflect the culture of their communities, where everyone feels welcome to share delicious food, enjoy conversation and connect with one another.”

New Seasons is also interested in holding down the anchor grocer slot in the development projects set to arise around Capitol Hill Station. The grocer planned to open its first Seattle location in Ballard this year. Labor groups have opposed the company’s expansion to Seattle citing “an anti-union climate” at the company. Continue reading

Capitol Hill Community Post | Your Voice, Your Choice Results — Four District 3 Projects

From SDOT

We’ve counted each vote and checked it twice! And, now is the moment you’ve all been waiting for: the announcement of vote results for Your Voice, Your Choice: Parks and Streets!

DISTRICT 3  

  • Capitol Hill: Crossing Improvements at I-5 Exit on to Olive Way (Cost: $75,000, Total Votes: 240)
  • Central District: Traffic Calming on 17th Ave S between E Yesler Way & S Jackson St (Cost: $15,000, Total Votes: 200)
  • Judkins Park: Improved Connections to Judkins Park from S. Dearborn St (Cost: $90,000, Total Votes: 173)
  • Capitol Hill: Crossing Improvements at 19th Ave E & E Denny Way (Cost: $83,000, Total Votes:  171) 

As a bonus, while Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) reviewed ideas submitted by Your Voice, Your Choice participants, it ran the projects through its program priorities and was able to fund additional traffic calming and pedestrian improvement projects in underserved neighborhoods throughout the City. SDOT will work with communities to announce, design, and implement these projects in the upcoming year.

To provide some context to the results above, with $2 million to spend on park and street improvements, we allotted a maximum of $285,000 per City Council District. After the top projects in each district were selected by voters, there was $233,019 remaining in the budget. These dollars were used to fund one additional project in the three districts with the highest voter participation (Districts 1, 2, and 5).

You will also note that the number of funded projects varies per district. This is because the fund allotment is based strictly on overall cost and not the number of projects. The funding for these projects will be included as part of the Mayor’s 2018 Proposed Budget, and the work will begin in 2018.

This is the second year we have asked residents to weigh in on how to spend a portion of the City’s budget. Last year the focus was on youth, and this year anyone over the age of 11 could participate.  We are blown away by the response with 7,737 community members voting for projects in their neighborhoods! We are so grateful to everyone who participated:

  • The community members who kicked things off in February by submitting 900 ideas for projects.
  • The community members who participated on the Project Development Teams.
  • The Vote Champions who mobilized their communities.
  • The educators in Seattle Public Schools who made sure students’ voices were heard.
  • Our Community Liaisons who were out in force with translated ballots in Arabic, Chinese, Somali, Spanish, and Vietnamese.
  • The amazing City staff at libraries and community centers who facilitated in-person voting.
  • And, of course, you the voters!

19th and Madison’s Mount Zion to be considered for Seattle landmark protections

With more than 125 years of history in Seattle, one of the largest black churches in Seattle will soon find out if its 1962-built home qualifies for landmark protection. The Mount Zion buildings at 19th and Madison will be considered by the Landmarks Preservation Board in September:

Landmarks Preservation Board to consider nomination of Mount Zion Baptist Church for landmark status

SEATTLE (August 4, 2017) – Seattle’s Landmarks Preservation Board will consider nomination of the Mount Zion Baptist Church (1634 19th Avenue) located in Central Area on Wednesday, September 6 at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be held in Seattle City Hall (600 4th Avenue, Floor L2) in the Boards & Commissions Room L2-80.

The public is invited to attend the meeting and make comments regarding the nomination. Written comments should be received by the Landmarks Preservation Board at the following mailing address by 3:00 p.m. onSeptember 5:

Seattle Landmarks Preservation Board
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
PO Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649

You can also submit comments via email.

According to our Re:Take history of the church, Mount Zion was founded in the 1890s, and for its first decade rented a few different spaces downtown. Church members date Mount Zion to 1890 when “a small group of African Americans held prayer services in their homes.” The church eventually bought its own property and moved to 11th and Union joining another African American — First African Methodist Episcopal (First A.M.E.) at 14th and Pine. 24 years later, Mount Zion moved to its present day home.

As development on East Madison has risen around it, Mount Zion has also been making longterm plans for redevelopment. The church has also recently sold off nearby property. In 2015, CHS was there as Mount Zion celebrated its 125th anniversary.

The full nomination document is below. Continue reading

Police search unsuccessful after woman robbed on 24th Ave

Police are investigating a reported armed robbery after a woman was mugged and thrown to the pavement on the backside of the Midtown Center commercial block at 23rd and Union Tuesday night.

According to East Precinct radio dispatches, the suspect grabbed the victim and claimed to have a gun pressed against her as he shoved the woman down and stole her wallet on 24th Ave just after 10:30 PM Tuesday.

Police spread out across the area and a K9 unit searched for the suspect described as a black male around 5’6″ and heavyset, wearing a white tank top, and dark jean shorts, last seen fleeing the area on foot to the east.

The search was not successful and there were no arrests. No serious injuries were reported.

CHS Crime Dashboard — Reported robberies by month — East Precinct (Source: SPD)

With a rise in gun incidents and shootings across the city, robberies are down so far this summer in the East Precinct and the area around the Midtown Center has seen fewer incidents of gun violence after a spike earlier this year.

In May, developers announced a $23.25 million deal to acquire the Midtown block for long-planned redevelopment.