Capitol Hill Community Council wants to help Green Your Space

A Seattle Seed Company workshop (Image: Seattle Seed Company)

A Seattle Seed Company workshop (Image: Seattle Seed Company)

One of the ongoing missions of the Capitol Hill Community Council is helping the area foster and manage its growth in the best possible way for the people who live and love the neighborhood.

In March, the council’s monthly gathering will be dedicated to another type of growth — flowers, plants, and gardens for your space “whether your home on 22nd or your studio apartment on Pine.”

Green Your Space will be held at the Capitol Hill Tool Library on Crawford Place the morning of Saturday, March 18th. You can RSVP here.

The event will bloom forth with help from the Seattle Seed Company. CHS wrote here about Sander Kallshian’s shop dedicated to gardening at a smaller, more micro level that moved onto 12th Ave below, yes, microapartments earlier this year.

Capitol Hill Community Council: Green Your Space

Capitol Hill Community Council holding benefit for Bellevue mosque damaged in fire

screen-shot-2017-02-16-at-8-12-45-pmNext week, the Capitol Hill Community Council is expanding its neighborhood borders to help the Islamic Center of the Eastside in Bellevue, which is raising money to rebuild after a January arson attack.

“We wanted to really dedicate our time and basically give our space to other folks in our community that are hurting or being targeted,” said CHCC president Zachary DeWolf.

While the ICOE may not be located on Capitol Hill or in Seattle, DeWolf said a benefit hosted by CHCC on February 23 is a way to stand in solidarity with not only the ICOE but also the Muslim community in the neighborhood.

While attacks on the Muslim community have been seen nationwide, so has support for Muslims, said Arsalan Bukhari, executive director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations in Seattle. Continue reading

CHS Pics | 2017 wishes from the Capitol Hill Community Council’s Winter Open House

By Lisa Hagen Glynn

We stopped through Thursday night’s Capitol Hill Community Council Winter Open House to ask the neighborhood’s most involved people about their holiday wishes. Here is what we heard. You can click to read all the wishes. Happy almost 2017.

Capitol Hill Community Council elects new officers

Screen Shot 2016-06-17 at 10.08.52 AMThe annual elections for the Capitol Hill Community Council were held last night. All positions were filled, and the council now has seven members.

Zachary Pullin, Natalie Curtis, and Mike Archambault are all returning members of the council; Lauren Berguson, Marley Blonsky, Tristan Gardner, and Katie Kurfurst were all elected to the council for the first time Thursday night in the organization’s June meeting at 12th Ave Arts. All positions ran unopposed.

Pullin has been on the council since 2014 and was elected as council president. He said he was excited to keep serving in whatever capacity he could, and his goal for the council was to “make sure that we are a part of,” rather than “impede,” the change happening on the Hill.

 

Continue reading

Capitol Hill Community Council | A brief history of community on the Hill (and why you should get involved)

Zachary Pullin is the President of the Capitol Hill Community Council

There is no Capitol Hill Community Council this month but please consider attending Thursday night's Capitol Hill Housing community forum -- Gearshift

There is no Capitol Hill Community Council this month but please consider attending Thursday night’s Capitol Hill Housing community forum — Gearshift
Thu, May 26 at 5pm
The Summit — 420 E Pike
The evening will feature five projects with the potential to increase the resilience of the neighborhood. The five projects:
+ Building leadership and power for renters on Capitol Hill
+ Expansion of the Capitol Hill Business Improvement Area
+ Lidding of a stretch of Interstate-5 at Pike/Pine to create developable land and open space
+Local sharing of meter revenue with the creation of a new Parking Benefit District (also recommended by HALA)
+The creation of a new city program to incentivize developers to build or maintain work or performance space for local artists
On May 26th, five professional urban planners and passionate community organizers will introduce these ambitious projects in a series of rapid-fire presentations followed by an opportunity for each guest to participate in a facilitated discussion about one of the five projects. Presenters include Sierra Hansen of the Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce, Scott Bonjukian of the Pike Pine Urban Neighborhood Council, Alex Brennan from Capitol Hill Housing, Zachary Pullin of the Capitol Hill Community Council and Tonya Lockyer of Velocity Dance Center. Civic leaders (City Councilmembers Kshama Sawant and Mike O’Brien are confirmed) will be there to listen and respond to your comments.
Free online tickets are no longer available but you can sign up to enter at the door Thursday night.

Growing up, my family taught me that service is a first priority, and I’ve worked hard to practice that value. Before I was born, my grandfather was the chairman of the tribal council – it’s long been instilled in me that serving the community is one of the truest, most authentic ways to interact with my community. But that doesn’t make sense or work for a lot of people.

It reminds me of when I was ten years old: I coordinated a mock trial day for my class with the help of my mom. What I remember being hardest to grasp at the time was “making a case” because it’s a different way of thinking. Sadly, I believe I’ve done a poor job at making the case for our Capitol Hill Community Council and the “why” because new people are still discovering us as though we’ve been serving quietly.

So, why should you care? Why should you get involved?

First, it’s important to reflect on our history.

The Capitol Hill Community Council – as a neighborhood group – has existed since as early as the 1940s. Back then, it was called the Capitol Hill Community Club and their main motivation for working together was to fight against integrating “their “neighborhood. In concert with redlining and housing covenants, this dedicated group of neighbors used fear, racial prejudice, and an aversion to change to keep black people out of the neighborhood.

In 1972, when queer folks had only recently began moving into the neighborhood, tension was high between long-time residents and queer people because we were seen as “faggots,” instead of as neighbors. Thankfully, a few friends established a gay community center to provide services to queer folks. Continue reading

Capitol Hill Community Council | Questioning? Meet your neighbors

Capitol Hill Community Council Neighborhood Social: Happy Hour at WitnessThursday, March 17th 4:30 to 6:30 PMWitness, 410 Broadway EEvery other month, the Capitol Hill Community Council has committed to hosting neighborhood social events - similar to our Meet Your Neighbor event last year - where we can create a space for neighbors to meet each other (in real life!), connect and engage with folks about topics that important to you and our neighborhood, hear from unique programs and initiatives, and spend a relaxing couple of hours just being in the community. This month, we're inviting King County Metro to share about "In Motion," which is an effort aimed at reducing drive-alone trips and promoting other travel options like biking, walking, or taking transit. Plus, we have a drawing for a gift certificate to another local, neighborhood restaurant! Sign in and you're entered into the drawing.

Capitol Hill Community Council Neighborhood Social: Happy Hour at Witness
Thursday, March 17th 4:30 to 6:30 PM
Witness, 410 Broadway E
Every other month, the Capitol Hill Community Council has committed to hosting neighborhood social events – similar to our Meet Your Neighbor event last year – where we can create a space for neighbors to meet each other (in real life!), connect and engage with folks about topics that important to you and our neighborhood, hear from unique programs and initiatives, and spend a relaxing couple of hours just being in the community. This month, we’re inviting King County Metro to share about “In Motion,” which is an effort aimed at reducing drive-alone trips and promoting other travel options like biking, walking, or taking transit. Plus, we have a drawing for a gift certificate to another local, neighborhood restaurant! Sign in and you’re entered into the drawing.

Questioning in the pursuit of understanding and progress must be valued. Otherwise, we lose the accountability of ideas and the innovation that moves our communities forward.

I was reminded of this just recently when I met with a friend and mentor from our community. She’s a neighborhood activist who has worked on various issues that have shaped Capitol Hill for the last few decades.

There came a moment when I recognized that we both had questions of the others’ ideas and intentions. Unchecked, our conversation may have unfolded in a direction neither one of us would ever have wanted.

So, I waited for the chance to interject and suggested that, in fact, questioning the way things are, in and of itself, is not detrimental to progress. I believe, it is what actually makes our work of creating shared community, stronger. Continue reading

Capitol Hill Community Council | A focus on empowering renters

Capitol Hill Community Council February: Know Your Rights, Grow Your Rights Thursday, February 18th, 6:30 PM 12th Avenue Arts -- 1620 12th Ave

Capitol Hill Community Council February: Know Your Rights, Grow Your Rights
Thursday, February 18th, 6:00 PM
12th Avenue Arts — 1620 12th Ave

The Capitol Hill Community Council continues elevating the issues most meaningful to our neighborhood. This month’s meeting, on Thursday, February 18 (6:00pm at 12th Ave Arts) focuses on empowering renters.

Advocates for tenants will provide helpful information about the rights of renters and the importance of being an informed renter. And guests from the City of Seattle will share opportunities to expand renters’ rights through HALA and the Housing Levy.

This focus speaks to a larger commitment that we’ve made to our community and ourselves: community development that affirms we are all neighbors who deserve the ability to thrive.

Lately, we’ve followed along with the discourse from nearby neighborhoods that continue to fiercely oppose change, that continue to reject the most vulnerable. We’re hoping that this new commitment and a diversity of meeting format helps us to be in community with our neighbors, more wholly. Continue reading

Capitol Hill Community Council | 2nd Annual Winter Celebration is chance to reflect on year, look ahead to challenges of 2016

image00Your Capitol Hill Community Council hopes to continue the exciting service we’ve provided the community throughout 2015, but we can’t do it alone. We’ll need the support of our neighbors and friends in Capitol Hill – just like you – to help us celebrate a successful year and cast a vision for 2016, which reminded me of an experience when someone’s gift inspired me.

Last July, Reiny Cohen, at-large member of our Capitol Hill Community Council, and I spent an afternoon buying supplies to create 200 care packs for people experiencing homelessness in our neighborhood. With four days left before the event, we hadn’t raised the necessary amount needed to cover the costs. But we made a commitment to each other and our community to do this project.

Over the next four days, our council needed to raise twice as much money as had already been donated. Hope and optimism empowered us that Sunday as we gathered more than two cart loads of supplies – toothpaste, socks, chapstick, sunscreen, and more – from the U-District Dollar Tree.

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2nd Annual Winter Celebration
Join us to affirm those values on Thursday, December 17 at 6:30 PM at Vermillion (1508 11th Ave), along with special guests Speaker Frank Chopp, Rep. Brady Walkinshaw, Seattle City Council members Tim Burgess, Lorena Gonzalez, and Kshama Sawant for an evening of celebration over food and drinks, music, and a spirit of community. We are also featuring raffle items – a linoleum rug courtesy of local artist Christopher Stearns of Westling Design and Capitol Hill Candle Co. We are grateful to our sponsors and supporters: Prime Sponsor Nyhus Communications, along with Windermere-Capitol Hill, Capitol Hill Housing Foundation, BANG Salon, Uncle Ike’s Glass & Goods, Abracadabra Printing, Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce, Guenther Creative, QFC, Hot Cakes, Cafe Solstice, and Vermillion Art Gallery & Bar, with special thanks to our media sponsors CHS Capitol Hill Seattle and Capitol Hill Times.


As our squeaky cart rolled up to the register, the man helping us grew curious about what we were doing. “Are you buying all of this to sell for a higher price somewhere else?” he asked with a half-serious grin, “Because sometimes people do that.” Continue reading

Capitol Hill Community Council | The battle between fish and firm

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Capitol Hill Community Council members Reiny Cohen and Zachary Pullin working with Dylan Cate of Rep. Brady Walkinshaw’s #WorkingTogether project to collect community priorities at the Punk Rock Flea Market.

Attending events across Seattle, particularly organizational fundraisers or campaign events, I connect with a variety of interesting people. Often, local electeds and community leaders attend and I always notice one particular behavior during these interactions.

People either shake my hand with the limp enthusiasm one receives when meeting someone who would rather be elsewhere or the confident, respectful hand-embrace given when greeting someone with whom you are familiar. I describe this as the battle between the fish or the firm.

When I was a kid, my father often let me go with him when visiting his friends around the reservation. Even at six, he would pester me about shaking his friends’ hands with strength and confidence. “It must be firm to show respect, not only for the other person but for yourself, as well,” he’d say. Whereas, a dead fish handshake illustrates that one is uninterested, nervous, and lacks confidence, which often leaves the receiver feeling disrespected.

So after reading a recent post on Seattlish titled Ballard NIMBYs are Not Happy that O’Brien, Murray Actually Care About the Homeless Freezing to Death, I thought about how our service through the Capitol Hill Community Council sometimes feels like an active choice between “the fish” or “the firm.”
Continue reading

Dig into Capitol Hill’s next big challenges (and opportunities) at Community Council’s ‘Activation Fair’

(Images: CHS and Capitol Hill Community Council)

The Capitol Hill Community Council is continuing to reinvent the way a community advocacy group should gather and organize to help change and preserve its neighborhoods. Old-school meetings are out. Gatherings to get something done are in. One recent example is the CHCC’s focus on homelessness earlier this summer. The next council meeting is a week away — but it could be worth planning ahead for the opportunity to gather with others to learn more about the next set of big issues and opportunities for Capitol Hill and help set the next course of action for the group:

Capitol Hill Community Council Community Activation Fair
The Capitol Hill Community Council October General Meeting takes place on Thursday, October 22 at 12th Avenue Arts (1620 12th Avenue) at 6:30 p.m. in the Pike/Pine room.

This month’s program is dedicated to maximizing community engagement by continuing the critical conversations that will and/or have affected our neighborhood.

With facilitators managing (what we like to call instead of “stations”) “Learning & Engagement Clouds” on topics, including HALA Recommendations, 2035 Comprehensive Plan, Convention Center Expansion, Vision Zero, L.E.A.D. Program, Emergency Preparedness, Light Rail station, Streetcar to help us learn more, identify ways to provide feedback and questions, engage with neighbors, and discover ways to advocate and get involved!

We’re trying something new because there are so many important conversations to have and we don’t want to miss our opportunity to add our neighborhood’s voice!

Join us!

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