In 2020, Washington primary vote on presidential candidates will finally matter

Finally in 2020, the Washington primary will matter as Democratic leaders voted this weekend to utilize a primary to allocate the state’s presidential delegates.

“Democrats in Washington are ready for the big show in 2020,” state Democratic Party Chair Tina Podlodowski said in a statement. “We look forward to more presidential candidate attention and visits, increasing voter and activist engagement.” Continue reading

Last day to tell Washington Democrats how you want to pick a presidential candidate in 2020

Today is the final day to add your $0.03 and vote on how the Washington Democrats should change the way they choose a presidential nominee:

Democrats in Washington State have traditionally held caucuses to vote for presidential nominees. That could change this year. Changes in DNC rules are requiring the Washington State Democratic Central Committee (WSDCC) to reevaluate some of its procedures. At the same time, changes in Washington state’s official primary process have given the WSDCC the opportunity to select either a primary or a caucus to allocate delegates for Democratic presidential candidates. We want to hear from you about whether you would choose a primary or a caucus, and — if you feel like sharing — your reasons for preferring one option over the other. That way the committee members of the WSDCC can make a more informed decision about which process to use.

You can choose and comment through April 4th here at waelectioncenter.com.

You can review the full plans here: Hybrid Primary-Caucus Proposal (PDF)  | . Full Caucus Cycle (PDF)

Washington, meanwhile, is moving up its presidential primary to make the vote more relevant. The Washington State Democratic Central Committee will now choose how the party will utilize the primary vote in 2020. In 2016 and past presidential elections, Democrats have caucused to dole out the state’s delegates. The last time around, there were incredibly long lines — and a landslide victory for Bernie Sanders — on Capitol Hill. The primary in Washington has been meaningless enough that we’ve canceled in recent years. In 2016, CHS wrote about the logistical frustrations of the caucus process for Capitol Hill-area voters.

There’s plenty of confusion about what possible changes mean in 2020. We think this thread from Northwest Progressive Institute ‏sums it up best: Continue reading

What will it take for Orion to outrace Sawant in D3? Business, bravery, and ‘a queer voice on council again’

Orion was introduced Tuesday by Aleksa Manila, “drug counselor by day, drag diva by night,” before his campaign announcement on Broadway

Walking through the Emerald City chaos of Broadway and its glorious mix of the glamour and the squalor of Seattle on a Tuesday morning is one thing. Holding a press conference to announce your candidacy for City Council at the corner of Broadway and Harrison in the middle of it all is quite another.

There is one thing for certain in the just-starting race for the District 3 seat at Seattle City Hall. The campaign will include two of the bravest politicians in the city. Continue reading

Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce head Egan Orion challenging Sawant for City Council seat — UPDATE

(Image courtesy Egan Orion)

The field challenging Kshama Sawant for the District 3 Seattle City Council continues to grow as newly-hired Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce head Egan Orion joined the race this week.

Orion, who is also the administrator of the Broadway Business Improvement Area, has long been a fixture in Capitol Hill before taking on a role at the chamber. He began working with Seattle PrideFest, where he is now the executive director, in 2007 and has been organizing what he says is the largest volunteer-driven event in the district with PrideFest Capitol Hill since 2017.

When a sudden accident led the city to revoke a Capitol Hill festival’s license in 2017, Orion and his team quickly stepped in with less than two weeks to set up five blocks worth of programming, a seemingly insurmountable goal. Continue reading

The King County election nobody* has heard about

You probably still have time to vote in a King County election that pretty much nobody has heard about.

The King County Conservation District works “directly with private landowners to care for the land and resources” that helps “farmers and other landowners voluntarily preserve and enhance our natural resources through cost-sharing, education and technical assistance.”

The district has an open seat with six candidates but to vote, you’ll need to request a ballot and have it postmarked by March 29th. King County voters can do that here.

Why bother? Take it away, King County Democrats:

The last few years have reinforced that we have to be engaged in every election, at every level. Local elections have a substantial impact on our daily lives. This is also where we build the bench of our future leaders. Let’s show ’em that Democrats vote every year, in every election!

Excellent work, citizen.

Tip of the farmer’s hat to The Stranger for letting us know about the election.

Nguyen makes run for District 3 with focus beyond Capitol Hill

(Image: Elect Ami)

The boundaries of District 3, of course, extend well beyond Capitol Hill. And the candidates to represent the district also extend beyond the names you might think of first.

Ami Nguyen, a public defender who calls Yesler Terrace home, sees her role as running for the Seattle City Council to represent people across the entire district — the Central District and Capitol Hill, yes, but Yesler Terrace, Mt Baker, Madrona, Leschi, Madison Park, and Montlake, too.

“When I set out to do this campaign, I told myself that’s the definitely the neighborhood I want to reach out to.” Continue reading

CHS Pics | Faces from the District 3 campaign kickoffs

It is early, so very early in the race for District 3. The primary won’t be held until August and we won’t even know the final roster fo candidates for months. But the race is taking shape. It is most definitely not a two candidate show — meet Ami Nguyen, a public defender dedicated to representing all the people of District 3, not just Capitol Hill — but two of the strongest contenders — incumbent Kshama Sawant and challengers Logan Bowers —  held their campaign launches last week. CHS stopped through to see who showed up and ask why they support the candidates. Click through the galleries to see their answers. Continue reading

Would you vote for solar-powered presidential candidate Inslee?

Gov. Inslee on light rail for the opening of Capitol Hill Station in 2016

On Capitol Hill, we’ve seen a lot of the latest Democratic candidate to toss their hat into the ring for the 2020 presidential election. This time, we probably won’t find him canvassing for votes while talking about potatoes and jobs at the Capitol Hill Farmers Market. But we might see him hanging around E Madison’s Bullitt Center, the sun-powered, super green office building he helped cut the ribbon on when it debuted in 2013.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee announced his bid for the presidency Friday in a Youtube video and a speech at South Seattle photovoltaic installation firm A&R Solar. “I’m running for president because I am the only candidate who will make defeating climate change our nation’s number one priority,” Inslee says in the video. While Inslee has poor name recognition beyond the Pacific Northwest, his climate change message has attracted powerful backers including billionaire investor and Democratic activist Tom Steyer who Friday called Inslee a “climate champion.”

Inslee isn’t the only prospective Washington State candidate. Former Starbucks CEO and longtime Madison Park lakefront mansion resident Howard Schultz has been kicking the tires on in independent run for president. Would you consider voting for either of them? Let us know in our 2020 candidate ranking survey:


View latest results here
Continue reading

You’ve got Seattle Democracy Vouchers, here’s how to use them

$2? Thanks for nothing

Seattle’s effort to change the game around campaign financing has already become an issue in the 2019 race for District 3 as who will — and who won’t — be participating in the progressive program has become a dividing issue in the earliest days of the race. Seattle’s Democracy Vouchers for the 2019 election have already been sent out and you may have been looking at the unopened envelope wondering what to do next.

  1. First, don’t lose them. Registered Seattle voters can use the four $25 a piece vouchers through the end of November.
  2. You’ll need to make a choice. But it doesn’t necessarily need to be about District 3. “Your 2019 Democracy Vouchers can be given to any participating City Council candidate, including candidates within or outside your council district,” the city writes. You can give all four of your vouchers to one candidate or you can engage in a little democratic roulette and spread the love around your favorite deserving candidates for city council who are participating in the program. The list of eligible 2019 recipients to-date is here. The mayoral race will not be eligible for the program until 2021 as the voucher fundraising limits are higher and the program needs more time to accumulate funds.
  3. Please print clearly. You can cash in your Democracy Vouchers directly to a candidate’s campaign, to the Seattle Ethics and Elections Commission, or by dropping them off at one of the designated locations. Vouchers must have your signature and the candidate’s name clearly written to be processed. Drop off locations and email addresses for the program can be found here.
  4. Or wait until the online portal is launched on February 28th. You can also make your Democracy Voucher online starting at the end of the month if everything goes as planned. Tune in here for details.

Registered voters in Seattle should automatically receive the $100 in vouchers in the mail. Seattle residents who are at least 18 and are either a U.S. citizen, U.S. national or a lawful permanent resident can apply for vouchers here. You can request replacement vouchers here.

More information is available at seattle.gov/democracyvoucher.

In race for District 3, Bowers puts housing first

Bowers says it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to understand Seattle’s lack of affordable housing (Image: Vote for Logan)

Covering an election as if it were a horse race is frowned upon when it comes to journalism ethics. It puts the focus on things like polling data and popularity — not policy. So, how about a Solowheel race?

It’s true. Logan Bowers rides an “electric unicycle” — he Solowheeled to our meeting with the candidate around the holidays at 15th Ave E’s Victrola. But while he was rolling across Capitol Hill, he was thinking about housing — housing policy.

“I think the thing to remember is that we had a huge win when we got $15 an hour minimum wage, but all of the gains from that wage — or nearly all of them have been eaten up by rent,” Bowers said. “So folks aren’t better off if we can’t control the price of housing.” Continue reading