Green Shores for Homes Training Program

This two-day workshop provides participants with in-depth knowledge about how the Green Shores credit and rating systems can be used to improve the quality of shoreline management projects. Green Shores for Homes is a voluntary program similar to green building rating programs such as Built Green and LEED with a focus on waterfront properties. A residential project receives points for design features.

The content is of interest to professionals (biologists, engineers, planners, landscape architects) and contractors, local and regional government staff, and others seeking to implement the Green Shores program for a shoreline improvement, new design or development, or other related shoreline projects.

The first day of the workshop begins with a review of shoreline ecosystems including threats and issues, management and restoration strategies, and regulatory structures in place. The Green Shores program, including benefits to stakeholders, steps for implementation, and credit systems, are also covered. The second day of the workshop focuses on application of the Green Shores credit and ratings systems through a series of desktop and field exercises. The workshop concludes with a guided group discussion around how to implement key concepts and put new learning into practice.

Taught by Nicole Faghin Washington Sea Grant, and Jessica Cote, Confluence Environmental Company

‘Divest the Globe’ protest briefly shuts down Capitol Hill bank

A day of protest against “tar sands funding banks” in Seattle and beyond started on Capitol Hill Monday morning as a small group arrived at the Broadway Wells Fargo only to find the branch locked-up — with a few customers still inside.

The Divest the Globe effort included an afternoon rally at Westlake before a planned set of protests at “100 SEATTLE BRANCHES OF THE TAR SANDS FUNDING BANKS: Chase, Wells Fargo, Bank of America, TD Bank and US Bank.” Continue reading

Pipeline ‘Valve Turner’ comes to Capitol Hill for legal defense fundraiser

Michael Foster at Sole Repair Wednesday night (Images: Alex Garland)

In October 2016, Seattle’s Michael Foster traveled to North Dakota to turn valves on the Keystone Pipeline and disrupt the flow of tar sands oil from Canada. One of a handful of Valve Turners, he now faces decades in prison after being convicted of conspiracy to commit criminal mischief, and trespass. Foster came to Capitol Hill this week to help raise funds to defend other Valve Turners.

“A year ago, it was long past time to take emergency action to stop the flow of tar sands oil, to stop coal, to stop not just the expansion in the new pipelines, but the existing flow has to be cut about 10% per year,” Foster said about his decision to take a stand for the environment. Continue reading

Seattle’s March for Science will start on Capitol Hill

A message from January's Womxn's March (Image: CHS)

A message from January’s Womxn’s March (Image: CHS)

Cal Anderson’s role as a center of protest against the Trump administration will continue and Earth Day 2017 will take on even greater meaning as the Seattle component of the nationwide March for Science will start in the Capitol Hill park:

March For Science – Seattle

The march will gather in Cal Anderson on Earth Day morning April 22nd before stepping off for a journey to the Seattle Center’s International Fountain.

“Science is the best method we have for understanding the world. It should be an open process, used to serve all people,” organizers write. “If you wish to support those aims, please join us and march to support it.”

Seattle has been an enthusiastic participant in a series of marches and protests coordinated to demonstrate resistance to the social and economic policies pursued by President Trump. In January, the massive Womxn’s March stretched from the Central District to the Seattle Center and included more than 120,000 people in its ranks. Also that month, an immigration rights protest marched across Capitol Hill. In February, Cal Anderson hosted an LGBTQ solidarity rally. More spontaneous protests in the wake of the election have also crossed the Hill. In March, Black Lives Matter marchers crossed the Central District. In the midst of it all, victories — here and there — have been struck in the courts and some have been inspired to step forward into new roles to help build resistance.

Now, for Earth Day and in response to Trump policies seeking to erode progress on slowing climate change, Seattle will take a scientific approach to speaking up for the environment.

 

Seattle Central culinary student launches gardening program in the middle of Pike/Pine

IMG_0951Trey Philpot is wearing overalls. He is also merging the gap between biology and culinary students and inviting anybody else who wants to learn about urban gardening to join him at the Seattle Central’s Plant Sciences Lab on Boylston Ave.

Philpot, who grew up gardening in his hometown of Greenville, Alabama, began culinary school at Seattle Central in January. Shortly after starting, he launched Green Thumbs Up as a way to bridge the gap between growing food and cooking it.

“I found out that a lot of culinary students have no gardening experience at all,” Philpot said. “They’re from the city, from a place where that wasn’t something that they did.” Continue reading

Sawant’s push to divest from Wells Fargo a fight for the environment — and against Trump

Sawant at a Seattle Central rally on Inauguration Day

Sawant at a Seattle Central rally on Inauguration Day

Monday — if the snow doesn’t postpone the session — the Seattle City Council will vote on an ordinance to divest from Wells Fargo because of its financial backing of the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline.

“The goal obviously is to not only put a stop to the Dakota Access Pipeline but to use that victory to build further momentum against climate change,” District 3 representative Kshama Sawant told CHS.

UPDATE: Final vote moved to Tuesday.

Last week, the Affordable Housing, Neighborhoods, and Finance Committee unanimously voted to send the ordinance to the full council for consideration, but not without some “quibbling” from a few members, Sawant said. Continue reading

‘We will fight’ — Seattle leaders respond to Trump’s immigration order

screen-shot-2017-01-25-at-2-03-55-pm

Facebook emoji were flying as González, Chief O’Toole, Mayor Murray, and others spoke in an address from City Hall’s steps broadcast to an audience of around 1,000 on Facebook

screen-shot-2017-01-25-at-1-58-16-pm screen-shot-2017-01-25-at-1-50-54-pmNobody punched a Nazi but Seattle City Council member and the daughter of a family of immigrants Lorena González vowed Wednesday to help lead her city to push back on President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration.

“We will fight,” González said Wednesday afternoon on the steps of Seattle’s City Hall.

Earlier in the day, Trump unleashed the new executive order setting the groundwork for his pet Mexican border wall project and for cutting federal grants to so-called sanctuary cities, his latest blast in a first week in office marked by preliminary attacks on undocumented immigrants, civil rights, women’s health, the Affordable Care Act, and the environment.

Mayor Ed Murray Wednesday called the order the “darkest day of immigration history in America” since the Japanese internment during World War II.

“The executive orders are counter to our constitution and a threat to this city’s values,” Murray said. Continue reading

Get on the battery bus: King County leads way with $90M+ plan for new electric buses

(Image: King County)

(Image: King County)

You likely won’t see one regularly crossing Capitol Hill until 2020 but King County Metro is accelerating its efforts to reduce emissions and become a carbon neutral system with a $90 million-plus plan to add more than 100 battery-only electric buses to its fleet.

“This puts us in on the forefront of innovation and technology,” King County Council member Rod Dembowski said. “We were innovators in wheelchair lifts. We were innovators in hybrid electric. Transit agencies look to us for what they’re going to adopt.”

“We are signaling that is is proven technology,” the county District 1 rep tells CHS. Continue reading

CHS Pics | Capitol Hill — and its living building — soak up chilly January sun

(Image: CHS)

(Image: CHS)

With highs in the 30s, Seattle’s La Nina January has started the year off with a chill. But the sharpest cold has also coincided with sunny, clear days. That’s good news for Capitol Hill living building the Bullitt Center where the solar arrays have been collecting about 43% of the office building’s energy needs from the sky.

The solar powered start to 2017 continues a trend. In 2016, the building generated more power than it used:

The Bullitt Center opened at 15th and Madison in 2013 and is still considered one of the greenest office buildings in the world. In October, CHS reported on efforts to kickstart the city’s Living Building incentive program to encourage more projects like the Bullitt. Capitol Hill is also home to 10th Ave E’s Bertschi School and its Living Science Building. Meanwhile, the next big green project on the horizon on Capitol Hill is slated to rise at 13th and Pike where plans are moving forward for Seattle’s first Passive House-certified mixed-use project.

Design review: What could be Capitol Hill’s (and Seattle’s) first Passive House-certified mixed-use project

screen-shot-2016-11-29-at-4-43-51-pmWednesday night’s session of the East Design Review Board includes what could be the final session before construction can begin on the Liberty Bank Building, a project that many hope can be a model for inclusive development in the Central District. Another trailblazing project — this one at 13th and Pike — could also pass through its final review Wednesday night.

Design review: 1300 E Pike

The project hoped to become Seattle’s first Passive House-certified mixed-use project will come to the board with developers Maria Barrientos and Cascade Built teaming up with architects Weber Thompson to take another crack at approval after falling just short in September. Continue reading