‘Zero waste’ Scoop Marketplace makes Earth Day debut at The Works on 12th Ave

(Image: The Scoop Marketplace)

(Image: The Scoop Marketplace)

12th Ave DIY community, class, and retail provider The Works has sprouted a new friend to help with your zero waste ambitions this Earth Day. The growing 12th Ave class and retail space is now home to Scoop Marketplace, a grocery dedicated to efficient and package-free shopping.

The new market debuts Monday with a sale, giveaways, along with The Works hosting an Earth Day plant swap.

“Scoop Marketplace was founded out of a need for a grocery store that facilitates low impact living,” Scoop founder Stephanie Lentz says. “Our family was always naturally inclined toward environmentalism, but we didn’t realize just how much thoughtless consumerism we were taking part in. Once we embraced the zero waste lifestyle, we were eager to change our family routines, and eliminate waste. The changes definitely haven’t happened overnight, but the slow process has helped us better understand our relationship with food, possessions, and the things we throw away.” Continue reading

Plan would expand King County’s only landfill one last* time — UPDATE

King County needs more time to sort out a new era solution for getting rid of its copious mountains of trash — burning the garbage in a waste-to-energy like they do in densely populated areas of Europe, Japan, and.. checks notes… Spokane seems like a probable future.

But in the meantime, there is a plan to create a new addition to the county’s Cedar Hills Regional Landfill that officials say will give the giant garbage collecting facility — and the county’s only landfill –another 21 years of life. The King County Council will vote on the plan Monday.

UPDATE: The council announced Monday morning that the vote has been pushed back so officials have more time to consider newly proposed amendments to the legislation.

Continue reading

With solution to ‘aspirational recycling,’ Ridwell growing to pick up what Amazon leaves behind

Ridwell’s Justin Gough (Image: Ridwell)

It’s one of those perfect spring afternoons. The sun rays glitter on the water of Lake Washington. Ryan Metzger swiftly opens up his car door, walks up to the porch of a grand Leschi house and immediately reaches for the trash.

To clarify: it’s very clean trash meant for recycling; and the people who stuffed it all in cloth bags in the white bin on the porch knew Metzger, CEO of the local recycling startup Ridwell, would be there to pick it up. They pay for Ridwell’s subscription service (which starts at $10 a month) for pick-ups of used light bulbs, batteries, clothes, plastics and other materials that shouldn’t go in the garbage or are better off recycled and reused.

Metzger fishes one small bag out of the bin filled with a couple of batteries. Another is stuffed with old clothes, and a third one brims with what fits in the ‘plastic film’ category of scrunchable plastics, including ziplock bags and dry cleaner bags.

“It’s a lot of Amazon packaging,” Metzger says, while he opens the bag to check its contents. “Bubble-wrap-envelopes and stuff, which doesn’t fit in regular recycling.” Continue reading

CHS Pics | Seattle Youth Climate Strike — ‘We don’t have any more time to waste’

(Images: Margo Vansynghel for CHS)

Under an early spring sun, hundreds of students and some parents and supporters rallied on Capitol Hill Friday on the turf of the Bobby Morris Playfield for the Seattle Youth Climate Strike.

The students came to Cal Anderson from schools across King County, including Garfield High School, Thornton Creek Elementary School, Nathan Hale and Sammamish High School. They skipped school to demand legislative action on both local and state levels in Washington, adaptation of the Green New Deal to shift to 100% renewable and clean energy, and the declaration of the climate crisis as a national emergency. Continue reading

Students to lead Seattle Climate Strike at Cal Anderson Park

Don’t worry about those kids cutting school and gathering in Capitol Hill’s Cal Anderson Park Friday. They’re doing it for a good cause.

The park is set to host the Seattle Climate Strike, a student led demonstration part of a day of protests and walkouts planned across the country and around the planet Friday:

Seattle Climate Strike

Organizers here say they are fighting for “radical legislative action” and the Green New Deal: Continue reading

‘Where does it go?’ — No big changes for Seattle recycling… yet

Inside a Seattle sorting facility (Image: CHS)

The short version: After a study, there will be no immediate changes to Seattle’s curbside recycling program — even though your “aspirational recycling” efforts are gumming up the system.

The long version is more detailed.

Seattle and King County are loving recycling to death. People are so excited about putting items in the blue bin instead of the black one, that it’s become a problem. The two main culprits are not properly cleaning items before recycling them, and putting things in recycling that aren’t actually recyclable – a phenomenon called aspirational recycling.

Residents are putting items in so often that China, which had been the market for about half of our recyclables, pulled out of the market. (It’s not just us. China is refusing recyclables from across the country.) The problem, say experts, are that items like plastic wrap, individual plastic bags, and soiled glass and plastic among others, gum up the works in the recycling machinery. Continue reading

This Capitol Hill entrepreneur could make human composting a reality

(Image: Katrina Spade)

“Magical” might not be the first word that comes to mind while enumerating the process of human decomposition. And yet, it is the exact word that Capitol Hill designer and entrepreneur Katrina Spade uses — twice — to describe the process of converting human bodies into soil.

“The fact that all we really need is nature is pretty magical to me,” Spade says, her soft timbre nearly drowned out by the clinking of coffee cups and cookie plates at Victrola.

With her company, Recompose, Spade hopes to make human composting in Seattle an alternative to burial and cremation, or at least a reality, by 2020. By then, she hopes to open a human-composting facility in the city. Spade dreams of a large, warehouse-like space where lush plants welcome grieving families. Hexagonal recomposition vessels are stacked high against the walls. Human bodies will recompose in the aerated, heated containers along with wood chips, alfalfa, and straw. Continue reading

Urban Canopy Cocktails

The Audubon network from coast to coast is working hard to support the next generation of conservation advocates — and Seattle Audubon is no different. From Gen Xers to Millennials, young professionals to student activists, we want to connect with you to protect urban habitats.

Needing an excuse to stray from the monotony in a long work week? Do you like the combination of a cold one and a good cause? Break up your week with some down time at Optimism Brewing. Learn more about what’s happening with habitat and wildlife in the city and network with others with similar interests.

Tickets $15, two drinks included. This event is 21+. This event is made possible by the generosity of our presenting sponsors: Jenner & Block LLP

To boost the Seattle dream of an electric car in every affordable garage, public charging stations being added across city, including one on Capitol Hill

(Image: Seattle.gov)

Elon Musk wouldn’t be pleased with the delivery timeline but Capitol Hill is lined up to host one of the city’s 20 planned public electric car chargers hoped to, um, jumpstart the adoption of electric vehicles in Seattle and make the automobiles more accessible.

Seattle City Light is making plans to install 18 more of the DC Fast Chargers for electric vehicles at 10 to 15 curbside and off-street locations across the city one of which will be located in the Capitol Hill neighborhood.

“We feel that as a public utility we have a responsibility to our ratepayers to invest in and implement solutions that support sustainability,” Jenny Levesque, community outreach manager for Seattle City Light, said at Monday’s Pike/Pine Urban Neighborhood Council meeting. Continue reading

Seattle City Council endorses I-1631 state carbon tax

(Image: CHS)

Global climate change experts said Monday we have only a matter of years to reverse environmental damage or be doomed to living on a dying planet.

One path to doing our part on the needed correction on global warning is a carbon tax.

Monday afternoon, the Seattle City Council approved a resolution endorsing Washington’s I-1631, an initiative to require the largest polluters in the state to pay $15 — and, eventually, more — for every ton of carbon dioxide their corporations release into the atmosphere:

A RESOLUTION endorsing “Clean Air Clean Energy” Initiative 1631, a statewide initiative to the people that would charge pollution fees on the largest corporate polluters and use the revenue to invest in healthy communities, clean our air and water, promote clean energy, and slow down the impacts of climate change – all under oversight of a public board.

The state estimates the initiative would raise more than $2 billion to combat climate change in its first five years and $1 billion annually starting in 2023. Continue reading