Monitoring and Adaptive Management

This class aims to remove the mystery from monitoring and adaptive management. Class attendees will gain an overview of elements of ecological restoration monitoring and adaptive management concepts to monitor, gauge, and sustain more successful ecological restoration projects. They will learn about monitoring techniques and tools, how to design a monitoring plan that aligns with project goals, and will be introduced to data interpretation and its purpose and implementation in adaptive management. Lunch included.

Taught by Joy Wood, Restoration Analytics & Design, LLC, and Dan Hintz, Restoration Project Coordinator with Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust

Worms Free Class

Start off October with a deep dive into the world of worms. Peggy Morgan will introduce you to a society you only know in passing, unless – like her – you have been in love with worms all your life! We will talk about the nitty gritty of worm life, like castings (poop) and how worms are made (sex). From vermicomposting and worm bins to worms in the wild, our local populations and some exotics, this program will take a broad stroke and cover everything you wanted to know (and probably some questions you didn’t even think to ask) about worms.

Instructor Peggy Morgan, a psychotherapist for over 30 years, a Toastmaster over 25 years, and a Master Gardener over 20 years has raised 6 children and loves learning something new and something funny every day. You are the first group to hear her presentation on worms and she wants feedback from you to keep making it even better!

Shearables and Hackables Pruning Class

Find out which plants are which, and how to correctly shear.

This lecture series is designed for those who work in landscape maintenance. Classes last two hours and are held on Wednesdays in 2018. Each lecture provides information on tools and techniques for quality pruning with better long-term results and customer satisfaction.

The Master Pruner Series is offered in partnership with PlantAmnesty.

Taught by Christina Pfeiffer

Gardening with the Seasons: Winter

Though it seems there isn’t much to do in the garden over winter, dormant season tasks can set the stage for a good gardening year. When weather keeps us indoors, we can plan ahead for tasks and garden changes to be done in the months ahead. When the weather is nice enough to spend time outdoors, it can be amazing how much we can actually take care of now. This session will cover dormant season pruning and transplanting for specific plant types, winter weeding and garden care, best tools and practices, and planning ahead for the new growing season.

 

About this series:
Plants and gardens don’t live by the written calendar, but by the seasonal cycles and cues of changes in daylight, temperature, and moisture. When gardeners become acquainted with the seasonal rhythms and life cycles in the garden, and learn to work in sync with nature, caring for the garden becomes more of a process and less of a battle with potential garden enemies. This series will help beginning and seasoned gardeners learn how to capitalize on optimal timing and sustainable practices to have a great garden all year long.

Gardening with the Seasons: Spring

As spring approaches and things start moving fast in the garden, it can be hard to keep up or decide what to do first. With a focus on seasonal growth patterns, and best tools and techniques, this session will help home gardeners determine what tasks will have the most effect for the progress over the next months. Key topics will include planting, seasonal care for shrubs, vines, and perennial plants, lawn care, mulching and preparing for summer irrigation.

 

About this series:
Plants and gardens don’t live by the written calendar, but by the seasonal cycles and cues of changes in daylight, temperature, and moisture. When gardeners become acquainted with the seasonal rhythms and life cycles in the garden, and learn to work in sync with nature, caring for the garden becomes more of a process and less of a battle with potential garden enemies. This series will help beginning and seasoned gardeners learn how to capitalize on optimal timing and sustainable practices to have a great garden all year long.

Gardening with the Seasons: Summer

Summer brings an abundance of growth and blooms…and sometimes garden problems. Managing weeds and irrigation are prime targets for attention at this time of year. Time saving tips for pro-active garden care will help gardeners have more time to enjoy their gardens. Key topics will include care of seasonal containers, watering practices, potential weed and pest problems to be aware of, and specialized pruning practices for the season.

 

About this series:
Plants and gardens don’t live by the written calendar, but by the seasonal cycles and cues of changes in daylight, temperature, and moisture. When gardeners become acquainted with the seasonal rhythms and life cycles in the garden, and learn to work in sync with nature, caring for the garden becomes more of a process and less of a battle with potential garden enemies. This series will help beginning and seasoned gardeners learn how to capitalize on optimal timing and sustainable practices to have a great garden all year long.

UW Farm Talk & Tour

UW Farm Talk & Tour

Monday, August 7, 2017, 6:30-7:30pm

The UW Farm is a campus center for the practice and study of urban agriculture and sustainability. It is an educational, community-oriented resource for people who want to learn about building productive and sustainable urban landscapes. Take this free class and learn about the farm and its history, who works there, and what they produce, followed by a brief tour of the farm site at the Center for Urban Horticulture.

The tour is free, but pre-registration is requested. $5 donation requested at door.

Register online at http://www.uwbotanicgardenscatalog.org/UW-Farm-Talk-Tour-P1550C265.aspx

 

Using Native Plants in the Landscape

Using Native Plants in the Landscape

Wednesday, August 16, 2017, 8:30am-12:00pm

This class is designed for professionals working in the landscape field. However, anyone is welcome to attend.

From conservation landscapes to fine gardens, our local flora plays a vital role in habitat preservation, landscape functions, aesthetics and regional character.  In the time since David Douglas’ plant expeditions in the early 1800’s, some 240 species of our west coast native plants have been mainstays in cultivated gardens in Britain and Europe.  This class will explore the cultivation and design uses of different types of Puget Sound native plants and native plant cultivars in a variety of landscape settings and styles.  Valuable information on gardening near and preserving mature native trees will also be covered.

Taught by Christina Pfeiffer, Horticulture Consultant

Cost: $65

Register at http://www.uwbotanicgardenscatalog.org/Using-Native-Plants-in-the-Landscape-P1496C268.aspx

 

West Seattle Garden Tour

The 23rd annual West Seattle Garden Tour will feature 10 stunning private gardens, and shine a spotlight on one of West Seattle’s beautiful P-Patches. From waterside gardens with sweeping views of Puget Sound to pocket-sized tribute gardens rich with emotion and personal history, the variety of gardens on this year’s tour will offer something special for every gardener looking for a little inspiration.

Annually West Seattle Garden Tour donates net proceeds, about $25,000, to other non-profits promoting horticultural-based interests, education, and artistic endeavors. The 2017 beneficiaries are City Fruit, ArtsWest, West Seattle Bee Garden, Pianos in the Parks, Seattle Children’s PlayGarden, and Delridge Neighborhoods Development Association.

Arboretum Spring Plant Sale

Don’t miss this charming plant sale at the beautiful Washington Park Arboretum! Enjoy a stroll in Seattle’s premier public garden while it’s in peak bloom, and then buy beautiful, high-quality plants for your own garden. All sales support the maintenance and kids’ education programs at the Arboretum.