CHS Re:Take | The 1892 problems at Harvard and Thomas

When you are at the intersection of Harvard and Thomas and look around, it’s impossible to not be awed and a bit baffled by the utter lack of planning and engineering.

You probably have an intersection that confuses you or an intersection you hate. Leave a comment and we’ll see if we can console you with some sort of reasoning. Meanwhile, here’s one odd truth.

What’s wrong?

Harvard and Thomas… it’s one of a kind. As it heads south Harvard changes from a normal, comfortably cozy Capitol Hill residential street into a confusing mass of concrete with no clear use or direction. Continue reading

Why they’re building a hotel and apartment building on Harvard Ave

screen-shot-2016-11-07-at-4-13-49-pmAdding some hotel space and apartments to Capitol Hill was an easy decision for Jon Coulter and his business partners Rod McClaskey and Terry Boyle.

In spite of the common perception of soaring rents and developers making money hand over fist, Coulter says they are running up against some softness in the market, at least in the higher-end range where they build.

“The pressure of the rents is downward,” Coulter said. “We’re testing the top of the food chain.”

Design review: 1818 Harvard Ave

And he’s expecting that downward pressure to keep up, with hundreds, if not thousands of new units coming online over the next few years.

“We’re not sure what 380 square feet will get us in Capitol Hill in three years when it’s done,” Coulter said. Continue reading

Down Pour aims to be new off-Broadway coffee spot

Capitol Hill’s coffee scene may have a neighborhood vibe but you’re still most likely to find cafes on the main drags like Broadway or Pike and Pine. Down Pour, born in Redmond two years ago, is expanding to Capitol Hill, opening on Monday just off Broadway on the ground floor of the Rubix Apartments at 515 Harvard Ave. E.

Down Pour owners Steve and Ronni Fields didn’t have plans to expand out of Redmond, but the owner of the building approached them about opening a location there.

“We spent a lot of time here and really got excited about the idea,” Steve said. Continue reading

Hotel plus microshousing development planned right around corner from Capitol Hill Station

screen-shot-2016-10-20-at-3-24-31-pm

Don't judge the design just yet -- this is just the massing concep

Don’t judge the design just yet — this is just the massing concep

A new seven-story development planned for Harvard Ave just off E Denny will include “small efficiency units” for around 42 residents interested in a place to live on Capitol Hill at a reasonable price and near one of the neighborhood’s greatest new assets — Capitol Hill Station. They’ll have some interesting, though transient neighbors. The first four floors of the planned building at 1818 Harvard Ave, if developers get signoff on the plan, will be a hotel:

The proposed project consists of a 7 story building with 42 small efficiency dwelling units above, four floors of hotel with 70 rooms. Parking for 19 vehicles will be located on one level of below grade parking with access off of Harvard Ave. The existing three story apartment building will be demolished.

The developers behind 12th Ave’s Sola 24 building are now moving forward with plans to develop the Harvard parcel they acquired in 2012 for just under $2 million, according to county records. The project is being planned for a site where a 1950s-built, three-story apartment building stands today, just around the corner from the sprawling Capitol Hill Station campus where development is on track for a 2019 opening of new affordable housing and commercial space around the transit hub. Continue reading

Big police and medic response on Harvard Ave

(Image: Tim Durkan)

(Image: Tim Durkan)

Seattle Police and medic units rushed to the Seattle Housing Authority building in the 600 block of Harvard Ave E Friday afternoon to a reported self-inflicted shooting inside an apartment.

Police say a man suffered injuries in the self-inflicted shooting around 2:20 PM Friday. Seattle Fire had been called to the scene for a report of a man suffering an unknown medical condition before the shooting happened. We do not have further information about the man’s condition.

The large response and presence of East Precinct commanding officers in formal dress uniforms caused concerns for people in the area. Capt. Paul McDonagh and others had just attended the MLK celebration at 19th/Madison’s Mt. Zion when the shooting was reported. A construction crew wearing hazardous material suits and working with yellow “police tape” nearby also caused concern. The crew, it turns out, is at work on the overhaul of the old Harvard Exit building next door.

Meanwhile, a male in his 20s on the sidewalk nearby on Harvard suffering from a suspected drug overdose was found by police responding to the suicide attempt. Seattle Fire was called to assist that victim.

For resources and help to prevent suicide, please call the national suicide-prevention hotline: 1-800-SUICIDE or the local crisis clinic: (206) 461-3222

Capitol Retrospective | The Roycroft: A quest for independence at the confluence of speculation, regulation and panic

Seattle, 1899-1901.  Composite of two maps with Roy & Roy Mill circled in red.  Courtesy Office of Coast Survey and Burke Museum

Seattle, 1899-1901. Composite of two maps with Roy & Roy Mill circled in red. Courtesy Office of Coast Survey and Burke Museum

In 1899 the quickest route to West Seattle was by train over a wooden trestle that ran along the northern edge of the Duwamish Bay tide flats crossing what would later become Harbor Island. That May, Edward Roy, his older brother Charles, and father Lucien would have taken this train out to the trestle’s midpoint to tour the lumber mill they would purchase later that month.

Peering out the train’s window to his left while his brother and father talked business, Edward would likely have been distracted by the countless array of shifting channels and tide pools glistening over hundreds of acres of mud. It was here that he saw one of many opportunities to reinvent himself instead of living in his brother’s and father’s shadow.

It was here, and elsewhere throughout the city, that Seattle would experience one of the greatest real estate booms in its history granting Edward both the independence from his family he so dearly desired and a refuge from the coming collapse of the lumber market. This is the story of Edward Roy and The Roycroft Apartments on Harvard Ave E. Continue reading

Baby Jesus missing on Harvard Ave

(Images: CHS)

(Images: CHS)

Baby Jesus is missing on Harvard Ave.

The Capitol Hill Presbyterian Church has posted a flyer near the site of its annual Nativity scene pleading for the return of the Prince of Peace:

Jesus was last seen on Tuesday, December 2nd. The disappearance has not been reported to Seattle Police.

The church on Harvard Ave just below Seattle Central continues to display the Christmas-light decorated Mary and Joseph minus the babe. But churchgoers would like their little messiah back.

If you find Jesus, please return him to 1729 Harvard Ave.