Capitol Hill Housing unveils plans for eight-story ‘LGBTQ-Affirming Affordable Senior Housing’ development on Broadway

UPDATE: An early project rendering (Image: Environmental Works)

An early conceptual rendering of The Eldridge (Image: Capitol Hill Housing)

Architects and Capitol Hill Housing representatives have showcased plans for an eight-story affordable housing project specifically for LGBTQ+ elders on Broadway between Pike and Pine that will include at least 100 units at a mix of income levels rising above the preserved facade of an auto row-era Seattle landmark.

The project was originally planned to be located on their property at 14th and Union, but the location was shifted to Broadway partly due to influence from the city, according to Chris Persons, CEO of Capitol Hill Housing, the nonprofit developer at the center of the effort. He says the new spot is “much more in the center of the LGBTQ+ community on Capitol Hill.”

“This building is going to really make a mark,” Freya Johnson, project architect at Environmental Works, said Wednesday night during a community meeting at The Summit on Pike. “It’ll be a symbol that we belong here, that this is our Hill.”

One attendee said later: “In my lifetime, I didn’t think I’d see this.” Continue reading

‘Community preference’ — A new anti-displacement policy could have big impacts for the Central District and Capitol Hill

The Liberty Bank Building in the Central District

Antonesha Jackson still remembers riding bikes near the three-bedroom Central District apartment she shared with her sisters and mother growing up. From there, it was just a brief trip to her grandparents’ house and an even shorter walk to Garfield High School.

But when she tried to return to the neighborhood after 12 years studying and working in Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, finding a place to rent in her now-gentrified neighborhood proved nearly impossible. She looked for an affordable apartment for months.

Until acquaintances told her about a then-new affordable housing development right here in her neighborhood: Liberty Bank Building, an equitable development project led by Capitol Hill Housing and Africatown. She moved in this March, finally returning to the area she’d grown up in and now operated a fashion boutique out of.

“A lot of the people that live in my building, I have seen around growing up. [They] are from this community,” Jackson said. “It’s beautiful to me.”  Continue reading

Nonprofit developer moving plan for LGBTQ-focused affordable senior housing project to Broadway — UPDATE

The Eldridge (Image: Mithun)

Nonprofit developer Capitol Hill Housing is shifting its efforts to create a publicly funded LGBTQ-focused affordable senior housing development to the heart of the neighborhood with plans for the building now centered on Broadway between Pike and Pine.

“With 90+ affordable apartments at 60% at or below area median income, a main goal of the project will be to create an anchor for a community at risk of displacement – one that provides health and social services to residents as well as community members not living on site,” Capitol Hill Housing said in a statement on the major change for the project.

UPDATE: A person with knowledge of the plans says that Capitol Hill Housing is shifting its plans for senior housing to The Eldridge project across the street where Tacos Guaymas stands today. UPDATE x2: Capitol Hill Housing has confirmed The Eldridge location.

CHH has been pushing forward with plans to build The Eldridge, a preservation incentive-boosted affordable housing project.

CHH also did not say what will come next — if anything — at the 14th Ave and Union parking lot site where the LGBTQ senior project was being lined up. Continue reading

CHS Pics | Led by thousands in Seattle Dyke March, Pride swells on Capitol Hill

There seemed to be more dykes — and people who love them — than ever on Broadway Saturday night. Friday night brought what looked like the largest Trans Pride Seattle ever to Capitol Hill. And in between, PrideFest Capitol Hill and quantifiably more beer gardens and street parties then ever filled the neighborhood with a 2019 celebration of LGBTQ rights, culture, and, yes, dogs dressed up in drag.

CHS marched along with Saturday’s Seattle Dyke March visiting the crowds and booths along Broadway for PrideFest Capitol Hill along the way. Thousands took part in this year’s march starting with the traditional rally at Seattle Central before taking to the street and heading north on Broadway. Continue reading

Huge crowd rallies for Trans Pride Seattle as fight for rights for all starts Capitol Hill Pride weekend

With reporting by Emily Piette and Alex Garland

In what appeared to be the largest turnout ever for the event, thousands marched on Capitol Hill and rallied at Cal Anderson Park Friday night to celebrate Trans Pride in Seattle and remember those we came before to fight for human rights for all.

“Every motherfucking thing they took from us, we want it all,” echoed from the stage as poets J Mase III and Lady Dane Figueroa of the Black Trans Prayer Book implored the gathered crowd to reclaim the “whitewashed” legacy of Marsha P. Johnson, and Johnson’s role in the 1969 Stonewall uprising on the 50th anniversary of the watershed event in LGBTQ history and culture.

Continue reading

Mayor’s 2019 Pride Awards winners include Wildrose owners, Womxn’s March Day of Action organizer

Mayor Jenny Durkan handed out the city’s 2019 Pride Awards Thursday night at Capitol HIll’s Queer/Bar. Honorees included longtime Pike/Pine nightlife entrepreneurs Shelley Brothers and Martha Manning of The Wildrose, Capitol Hill headquartered Seattle Counseling Services, and neighborhood resident Charmaine Slye, organizer of the Seattle Womxn’s March Day of Action.

Congratulations and happy Pride to the recipients. Details on the winners and the awards from the mayor’s office are below.

Mayor Durkan Honors Six LGBTQ+ Community Members at 2019 Pride Awards

 

Seattle (June 26, 2019) – In her second Pride Reception, Mayor Jenny A. Durkan honored the achievements of six leaders in Seattle’s LGBTQ community with the 2019 Pride Awards. This year’s award winners have had a lasting and positive impact on our City. This year’s winners are being recognized for decades of work to better our communities and advance the rights and dignities of our LGBTQ+ neighbors. Continue reading

Why The Cuff was also known as The Puff, Seattle had two Pride Parades in 1984, and 6 other things CHS heard at the ‘There Goes the Gayborhood’ panel

As this year’s Pride overlaps with the city’s ongoing Save The Showbox debate, a panel discussion held earlier this month at the downtown branch of Seattle Public Library titled ‘There Goes the Gayborhood’ considered “inclusion in preservation” and the history and future of Capitol Hill as a “gayborhood.”

The panel, organized by SPL, Historic Seattle and Cynthia Brothers of Vanishing Seattle, initially set out to discuss the question “how do we save the places that anchor Seattle’s LGBTQ communities but may lack the architectural significance typically required for landmarking” in the face of rapid redevelopment.

But much of the discussion veered towards a trip down memory lane and a need for keeping stories alive.

Here are eight things CHS heard at the panel:

  1. The property home to The Eagle is for sale. Fred Wildlife Refuge and Neighbours is for sale,” said Cynthia Brothers of Vanishing Seattle in her introduction. She said that as LGBTQ+ and creative spaces and people are pushed out, “preserving space requires more than façadism, (…) rainbow flags and crosswalks.” Continue reading

More hate vandalism on Capitol Hill: City says AIDS Memorial Pathway installations torn down

“When thinking about a temporary art, I thought about the condom, and how, at the start of the AIDs crisis, it became this necessary evil. This thing that people had to utilize and it was a constant reminder of death, of infection, it was a killjoy in a lot of ways. I wanted to take that thing, which was a symbol of fear, and turn it into something of beauty. Now that we’re sort of past that hump and we can look back with more appreciation of the struggle everyone went through and feelings people had. I used about 1000 condoms between the four pieces.” — Pete Rush – AMP Broadway

Artwork installed for Pride around the Capitol Hill Station mixed-use development construction site was ripped down almost as quickly as it went up over the weekend. The city’s Office of Arts and Culture said it is working on getting the works replaced.

Work by artists including Gabriel Stromberg, Pete Rush, and Timothy White Eagle were ripped down in the vandalism. The installations are part of the project creating the AIDS Memorial Pathway, a walkway featuring artwork and tributes that will connect the mixed-use buildings to nearby Cal Anderson Park when it opens in 2020. Continue reading

The Crescent’s Pride flag still flies after vandals target Capitol Hill bar’s LGBTQ symbol

The flag restored above The Crescent — “Hey homophobes! Less than 24 hours got that Pride flag up again lol! Yasss!!!” (Image: The Crescent)

The Pride flag is again flying above E Olive Way’s The Crescent after vandals targeted the dive bar’s queer banner over the weekend in what appears to be one of a handful of similar attacks across the city.

“Three cowardly men decided to shred our flag from in front of the Crescent!,” the bar posted Sunday morning after the vandalism. “If you think our freedoms and equality are not being challenged and threatened daily, think again!”

By Sunday night, a new flag was proudly flying again.

Security video posted from the bar shows a group of three males walk by the tavern in the early hours of June 16th and then stop with two of the suspects forming a base to boost the other up to reach the flag.

White Center gay bar The Lumber Yard also posted about a similar attack Sunday morning. 16th Ave SW’s The Swallow was also reportedly targeted. Continue reading

Pikes/Pines | Queer as nature — Capitol Hill roses are gender-fluid

Your Capitol Hill lawn is gender-fluid, too. Bobby Morris? That’s a different essay.

Pride month is here and I have something to tell you: Nature is queer. I don’t mean strange (though it is that too), but that the natural diversity of gender and sexuality in the Hill’s nature is part of its beauty. Culture can blind us, sometimes presenting facts that are actually fiction, particularly about the more than human world. Let’s bust that up a bit.

I write this as a white, straight, cisgendered man inexperienced in getting into the weeds on the subject of the LGBTQ world. Pride is easily co-opted as social capital, something I’d like to avoid. I am writing this not to co-opt but in an attempt to offer a few clumsy words to uplift some stories of natural diversity (and hopefully not inadvertently perpetuate violence or my privilege).

The complexities of gender and sexuality in nature (you may need to be reminded that this includes us), are fathomless. Despite being trained as an environmental educator, I am not a people expert; we will speak here about the more than human world, possibly as lessons for being human. The version of nature we are often given, of male and female organisms on an endless trail of sexual reproduction is a far cry from reality. Continue reading