Seattle Classic Guitar Society presents Jason Vieaux

The Seattle Classic Guitar Society is proud to present Grammy award winner Jason Vieaux in the International Series at Benaroya Hall. Winner of numerous prestigious international competitions, the Fort-Worth Star-Telegram proclaimed “Vieaux’s performance spun magic” and NPR described guitarist Jason Vieaux as “perhaps the most precise and soulful classical guitarist of his generation.” Music by Bach, Albéniz, Jobim, Methany, and Ellington.

Jason Vieaux plays Duke Ellington’s “In a Sentimental Mood”

Capitol Hill’s royal funeral for Prince: dancing, sermons, street art

#prince

A photo posted by Joshua Henry (@joshuahenry) on

(Image: https://twitter.com/NicoletteAN/status/724068416949100545via Twitter)

(Image: @NicoletteAN via Twitter)

Video provided by Kevin Zelko

Pop music legend Prince was remembered across Capitol Hill this weekend in karaoke bars and on the streets where a dance party briefly broke out on E Pike before sending patrons back inside the taverns and restaurants for Purple One-inspired playlists.

“We have so many choices of what we do in our lives,” Witness owner Gregg Holcomb said Saturday night, as he made Prince the subject of his weekly sermon inside the Broadway bar. “Let’s try and bring a little bit of love, and a little bit of sex, and a little bit of peace. And try to honor his memory as long as we can.”

On E Pike, Neumos, the Comet Tavern, and Big Mario’s hyped the Pike/Pine crowd into a disco that briefly closed off the street for a mini Capitol Hill Block Party with Prince’s music and purple lights up and down the street. East Precinct brass, clearly wanting to keep a tight lid on things one night after a shooting incident on the backside of Pike/Pine came in a string of gun violence across Seattle, told the Neumos management they needed to bring the tribute party to a close and gave the revelers 20 more minutes to enjoy the party. By 11:15 PM, the music was moved inside out of any purple rain and the friendly crowd — which reportedly included Mayor Ed Murray — was back on the sidewalks or inside the bars.

Prince’s night of tributes is the second wave of memorial energy to sweep over the Hill in 2016 in a year that has seen what feels like a greater than usual share of notable deaths. In January, David Bowie’s passing was also marked across Capitol Hill. Be ready for more and what could be a nearly perpetual state of pop culture mourning fueled by art and creativity, social media, marketing, and good old fashioned nostalgia at the scale of an increasingly interconnected planet.

More pictures from the remembrances, below.

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The small Capitol Hill company behind ‘the top musical act in the U.S.’

The Lumineers play Capitol Hill Block Party in 2012. The band's new album Cleopatra has pushed them back to the top of the charts (Image: Jim Bennett/CHBP with permission to CHS)

The Lumineers play Capitol Hill Block Party in 2012. The band’s new album Cleopatra has pushed them back to the top of the charts (Image: Jim Bennett/CHBP with permission to CHS)

Before The Lumineers’ “Ho Hey” became a multi-platinum hit, the band was making the rounds in Denver. They had posted a video on YouTube of themselves performing an acoustic version of the song in an apartment. In 2011, Capitol Hill management company Onto Entertainment liked what it saw — and heard.

Today, Onto’s roster includes The Lumineers, Seattle-based Hey Marseilles and poet and spoken word artist Andrea Gibson. And that’s probably as big as Onto is going to get for the time being – all three acts are touring in support of new work this year.

“I think we’re in a really good, sweet spot right now in terms of clients,” said Christen Greene, general manager and head of talent for Onto. “Our model is low-overhead, hard work and clients that we love.”

The path to becoming “the top musical act in the U.S.” and a Billboard No. 1 ranking for The Lumineers shows how it works. At the time the band was signed, Onto owner David Meinert also headed had previously organized the Capitol Hill Block Party, so convincing the folk-rock group to play the show was an obvious opportunity. Soon after they were in town, John Richards at KEXP was the first to play the group, followed by airplay on 107.7 KNDD, one of the first commercial stations to play the song, Meinert said. UPDATE: We erroneously reported Meinert was still running CHBP in 2012 — producer and Meinert business partner Jason Lajeunesse took over the festival that year.

After that, it wasn’t too long before the band blew up, and the 11th Ave-based Onto had stars on its roster. Continue reading

Jimi Hendrix Park finally ready to open this summer in the CD

plan_11-21After 10 years — longer than his meteoric music career — a park to honor Seattle native Jimi Hendrix is finally nearing completion. The fully designed Jimi Hendrix Park will open August 27th.

The 2.5 acre green space at 25th Ave and S Massachusetts was established in 2006 on the site of the former Colman School. A large fence had cordoned off much of the area as plans have inched forward to add facilities, design elements, and historic identifiers.

Thanks to a fundraising campaign and a $200,000 award from King County, The Jimi Hendrix Park Foundation has funded the last phase of construction of a shelter and Hendrix-inspired design elements. The park, which is adjacent to the Northwest African American Museum, will remain fenced off to allow grass to grow throughout the spring and summer.

Screen Shot 2016-04-07 at 5.22.51 PMThe park’s rock and roll design is inspired by Hendrix, who grew up near the area. The entrance and main path will be alongside a long guitar-like structure. The Jimi Hendrix Park Foundation also hopes to host music events at the park and “beautify Seattle, motivate youth and others to achieve in music and art, and strengthen the cultural pulse of the Emerald City,” according to the group’s website.

Hendrix t-shirts are now for sale to help sustain the park foundation.

Once the park is complete, it will only be a comparatively quick seven years until light rail arrives just steps away at the Judkins Park Station. Construction on station is slated to begin by mid-2017. It will be the western-most station on the 10-stop East Link line which will connect to the Link line at the International District/Chinatown Station.

(Image: Murase Associates)

(Image: Murase Associates)

Draze finds irony on 23rd Ave, Tacocat hates the Capitol Hill weekend

Claiming musicians for a neighborhood doesn’t really work when worldwide domination can be achieved with an Instagram and a Sound Cloud account. But when the music is centered on the lives and times on the streets around us, that’s another story.

Artists we’ve featured before on CHS are out with new works this week — both have a lot to say about life in Central Seattle.

Check out Draze’s new Irony on 23rd. “They say that 23rd is booming. Man, 23rd is ruined…”

“Guess the ‘hood needed a facelift…”

Meanwhile, Tacocat, fresh off its gig opening for Swedish death metäl band Bernie Sanders at Safeco, has released its new album Lost Time replete with yet another sly diss at the neighborhood it loves to hate:

First Hill club fixture Ruby Bishop inducted into Seattle Jazz Hall of Fame

BishopThis Sunday night, Ruby Bishop will once again saddle up behind the piano at Vito’s on First Hill for her weekly performance. The only difference will be that the 96-year-old Seattle jazz legend will have a new, well deserved title to add to her long list of accomplishments: hall of famer.

Bishop was inducted into the Seattle Jazz Hall of Fame Tuesday night at the Golden Ear Awards put on by the nonprofit and music publication Earshot Jazz. Bishop has been signing and playing a mix of classic ragtime, standards and oldies in Seattle for over 70 years and playing her weekly gig at Vito’s since 2010.

“You can tell that the piano comes as naturally as breathing to her, and she holds a grace and ease that you don’t (see) very often,” said Vito’s owner Greg Lundgren. “She still has mischief in her eyes and a sharp wit.”

Blackpast.org has more about Bishop’s remarkable life:

During World War II she, like many women in her era, became a Boeing B-17 mechanic and draftsman. After the war she learned steno-typing in preparation for becoming a court reporter, then studied to be a beautician. She later took up cabinetry-making, becoming one of the first women in the Pacific Northwest in that field. That expertise paid off in the 1950s when she rebuilt the entire family kitchen. Whatever jobs she held to help support the family however, she always looked to her nighttime music career as her main profession.

Over time others recognized her musical ability. By the time she was nearly in her 50s, Bishop had achieved enough prominence to be recruited by the U.S. Army to entertain G.I. troops stationed in South Korea and South Vietnam. By this point she was also performing before audiences in London, Paris, and Stockholm. Despite that success Bishop continued to view Seattle as her home.

Seattle’s first jazz hall of fame class in 1990 appropriately included Ernestine Anderson, the legendary Central District jazz singer who died last week at the age of 87.

Ruby Bishop at Vito’s from Joon Chang on Vimeo.

CHS Pics | The creation of Lovecitylove’s new Capitol Hill home

Lovecitylove’s newest location used to be home to Royal’s Cleaners. After completely gutting a vast majority of the building, including three layers of floor and a ceiling, the group still had a long list of renovations and repairs to make. (Images and words: Seth Halloran)

Lovecitylove’s newest location used to be home to Royal’s Cleaners. After completely gutting a vast majority of the building, including three layers of floor and a ceiling, the group still had a long list of renovations and repairs to make. (Images and words: Seth Halleran)

Zach Self sweeps away dust and dirt left from sanding the floor and pulling wood from the wall to this right, Wednesday Jan. 27th, 2016. Self is one of the core leaders of Lovecitylove and the only one amongst them with carpentry experience. Other members have been simply learning as they go along in renovating each space.

Zach Self sweeps away dust and dirt left from sanding the floor and pulling wood from the wall to this right, Wednesday Jan. 27th, 2016. Self is one of the core leaders of Lovecitylove and the only one amongst them with carpentry experience. Other members have been simply learning as they go along in renovating each space.

Since October, a group of talented artists and collaborators have been working to renovate and reopen the Royal Cleaners shop on Capitol Hill’s E Pike. This new space will be the fifth location for Lovecitylove, a Seattle based project that aims to encourage openness in the local arts community and provide a place for collaboration amongst local artists.

Lovecitylove has worked for three and a half years as a popup art space that finds its homes in closed business spaces. The core members of the group then work to redesign the space for hosting art shows, film screenings, and studio use. By collecting rental fees for use of the space, Lovecitylove is able to pay for the rent of the locations they’ve used. Their newest location at 1406 E Pike in the heart of Capitol Hill will be celebrating its grand opening with the group’s locally famous Open Mic Wednesdays.

LOVECITYLOVE X WEDNESDAYS
March 9th 8-11 PM
1406 E Pike
After months of work the new space is now ready to open !!! What was a dry cleaners not too long ago is now a …. Wait ends this WEDNESDAY // 5th edition of LOVECITYLOVE Bring Yourself : Bring Family : Bring Friends : Bring Seattle 1406 E. Pike Street (Royal Dry Cleaners) // $7-$10 // Doors @ 8

You can learn more at lovecity.love.

Lucien Pellegrin (left) and Jessica Carter (right) discusses how they could design creative lighting installations in the space, Wednesday Jan. 27th, 2016. Pellegrin conceived of Lovecitylove when he decided to slip a hand-written note under the door of a closed retail space next to the old Bauhaus location on Melrose Avenue. Pellegrin says with Lovecitylove he wants to “push the envelope a little bit, get Seattle to step up its creative spaces.”

Lucien Pellegrin (left) and Jessa Carter (right) discusses how they could design creative lighting installations in the space, Wednesday Jan. 27th, 2016. Pellegrin conceived of Lovecitylove when he decided to slip a hand-written note under the door of a closed retail space next to the old Bauhaus location on Melrose Avenue. Pellegrin says with Lovecitylove he wants to “push the envelope a little bit, get Seattle to step up its creative spaces.”

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