Capitol Hill Historical Society | Nagle Place created this month in history

On November 15, 1899 — one hundred and eighteen years ago this month — Nagle Place was dedicated by the Seattle City Council in ordinance 5630.

Where it’s at

Nagle Place is among the shortest streets in Seattle. It’s bounded by Pine Street on the south and Denny Way on the north, just three blocks long. It’s intersected only once, by Howell Street. The former Olive Street right of way brings a staircase down from Broadway which continues as a path through Cal Anderson Park to the east.

Nagle Place in the 1980s

Nagle Place in Kroll Map book at Seattle Public Utilities Engineering Vault, apparently updated through the 1980s

What’s a Nagle?

John H. Nagle came to Seattle in 1853 as the pioneers were first staking their land claims and filing “plats”, the first official maps of roads and property to be sold. The land that Nagle claimed was more than a mile northeast of the main town, centered on current Cal Anderson Park. He built a homestead and he worked a farm on the land.

We don’t know exactly what afflicted him, but in 1874 Nagle was committed to the Washington Territory Insane Asylum, deemed a “dangerous man”. His stay at the asylum was funded by renting and then slowly selling his property. Continue reading

The real pronunciation and future of Nagle (Nail?), founding father of Capitol Hill

John Nagle’s name is all over Capitol Hill, though you probably never notice it unless you’re walking down his namesake Place. Nagle was a Seattle pioneer and Capitol Hill landowner who died in 1897. Prior to his death, Nagle’s estate sold 161 acres of his land to the city, which included much of the land that makes up Cal Anderson Park and north Broadway today.

8443523121_64e801da1e_ounnamed (34)The strange stretch of Capitol Hill pavement is about to undergo some major changes as Capitol Hill Station development ramps up in coming years approaching the expected opening of the U-Link light rail extension by early 2016. The first signs of this change are now beginning to show:

Nagle Place Utility Relocation

Starting as early as Thursday, October 30, Sound Transit’s contractor will begin work on Nagle Place between Howell St. and E Pine St. to install underground utilities.

This work will require sawing the pavement, jack hammering, excavation and paving equipment. The project will take approximately one month to complete. Work hours are from 7 a.m. through weekdays.

Once the utility work is complete, crews will restore the area.

During this work, Nagle Pl., between E Pine St and Howell St. will be closed to through traffic.

Residents and patrons should enter Nagle Place at E Pine St. for the duration of the work.

What to expect:

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