Pete Souza

Pete Souza was the Chief Official White House Photographer for President Obama and the Director of the White House Photo Office. His new book, Shade (October 2018), is a portrait in contrasts, telling the tale of two presidencies through a series of powerful visual juxtapositions between the Obama and Trump administrations.

Van Jones

Van Jones is a social entrepreneur, CNN political contributor, and host of The Van Jones Show on CNN. Famous for his heartfelt election night coverage, Jones showed up as “the voice of reason” for people in red and blue states throughout the volatile 2016 political season.

“First Ten Years of American Communism” Discussion Group

This collection of letters and articles by James P. Cannon, one of the founders of U.S. communism, focuses on the years 1918-1928. Cannon gives a personal overview of the Wobblies (Industrial Workers of the World) out of which he emerged, and goes on to describe the founding of the Communist Party, which was inspired by the 1917 Russian Revolution.

In 1928 Cannon established the U.S. wing of the Trotskyist opposition movement, which split from Stalin’s bureaucratic and increasingly nationalist direction.

This book addresses the questions: who popularized Marx, Trotsky, and Lenin’s ideas among working-class Americans and why didn’t a similar revolution happen here? How did these ideas influence Black liberation and other civil rights movements in their infancy?

These questions and more are the subject of this weekly study group. Everyone welcome.

Monday nights beginning August 13 from 7:00-8:30pm
Snacks available at 6:30pm for a small donation.
New Freeway Hall
5018 Rainier Ave S. Seattle
On #7 bus line and near the Columbia City light rail station

Copies of the text available for sale at each session.
For info, call 206-722-2453 or email
FSPseattle@mindspring.com | www.socialism.com

Sponsored by Freedom Socialist Party

Capitol Hill Art Walk features a night for Washington reproductive rights at Generations

A work by Mari Shibuya

Capitol Hill’s monthly art walk brings a dose of political action in May. Tonight from 6 to 9 PM at E Mercer’s Generations gallery, NARAL Pro Choice Washington will host an event with artist Mari Shibuya and State Rep. Nicole Macri.

“I’m doing this event with NARAL to promote access to reproductive health care, and I am very glad to support them,” Macri said. “What they’re aiming to do at this event is to make sure we keep and elect legislators both in the House and the Senate in Olympia who will be strong pro choice voices.” Continue reading

CHS Pics | Hillary Clinton draws a crowd — and cookies, capes, and cheers — on Seattle’s Capitol Hill

Bigly loser Hillary Clinton still has lots of fans on Capitol Hill. Readers carrying her new book, What Happened, lined up on a chilly Tuesday outside 10th Ave’s Elliott Bay Book Company where the politician who nearly became the nation’s first woman president made a signing appearance.

Plenty of Capitol Hill luminaries found a place in line. Some like Linda Derschang whose Little Oddfellows operates inside the bookstore, came armed with gifts like HRC cookies. Others let their Hillary Clinton super capes do the talking.

Continue reading

Durkan sworn in as Seattle’s 54th 55th 56th mayor

Jenny Durkan, Seattle’s first woman to serve as mayor since 1926 — and the Pacific Northwest metropolis’s first out lesbian mayor, ever — was sworn in at the start of a five-stop tour from the south of the city to its north Tuesday afternoon. Fittingly, the whole thing was planned to come to end Tuesday night with a beer — Lake City Way’s Elliott Bay Public House marked the final stop.

Any Seattle voter who chose Durkan because she seemed like she might be a tough ally in the seeming culture war underway in the country probably liked what they heard Tuesday.

“We will not be bullied and will not be told what to do,” Durkan said. “We’re not spoiling for a fight but we will not back down from what we know is right.” Continue reading

‘Java with Jayapal’ in a Broadway cafe: Trump, GOP banking on resistance fatigue

(Images: Alex Garland)


Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.) met up with the Capitol Hill community Wednesday morning for some intimate updates and Q&A. The session inside Broadway’s Espresso Vivace showed the representative is busy doing the best she can to block Trump-esque bills with little time to push her own agenda through Congress.

“I mean, in reality, on the floor, our game is unfortunately a lot of opposition,” Jayapal said Wednesday. “We don’t get the opportunity to put bills forward the way they should be, or even craft them. There used to be hearings where you could offer amendments and reasonable people on both sides of the aisle would support a sensible amendment. That really happens hardly at all.”

As a result, Jayapal says she puts her priorities elsewhere. She explained to the gathered group that her focus remains on constituent services, getting more people involved, changing the makeup of who is involved, and being present in communities.

Jayapal is still able to find a way to move some efforts forward. Continue reading

O’Brien and Harris-Talley: Tax Seattle businesses for homelessness

In a press conference Thursday morning, Seattle City Council members Mike O’Brien and Kirsten Harris-Talley announced the core of a new proposed budget for the city: making the top 10% grossing businesses pay a tax of less than five cents per hour per full-time employee. The H.O.M.E.S. proposal — Housing, Outreach and Mass-Entry Shelter — would gather $20 to $25 million every year which to be applied to homelessness services, permanent housing, and vouchers.

“I’m afraid our current budget sets us up for failure,” O’Brien said. “This is not enough to solve the crisis. We will be asking the new mayor, whoever she is, to come up with a new plan in the first few months.” Continue reading

Seattle has a new new mayor


The good news: Three people wanted to be mayor of Seattle. Here is the announcement from the Seattle City Council on the “didn’t see that one coming” ascension of retiring council member Tim Burgess to the mayor’s office:

Burgess Nominated as Mayor of Seattle

SEATTLE – The Seattle City Council elected Councilmember Tim Burgess (Position 8, Citywide) as the 55th Mayor of Seattle today.  Burgess will take the oath of office today at 5:00 p.m., which will be administered by City Clerk Monica Martinez Simmons.  Burgess will serve as Mayor until King County certifies election results on November 28, 2018. Continue reading

2017 Primary Election Results: Durkan, Moon, Oliver lead in mayor’s race

Former U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan showed off her political strength and Seattle’s progressive left now knows who it will need to rally around to defeat her following Tuesday night’s first counts in the August primary. Meanwhile, history was also a winner Tuesday: Seattle is now on its way to electing its first woman mayor since 1926.

Urbanist and civic leader Cary Moon is on track to join Durkan in the November race to lead the city after garnering 15.56% of ballots tallied, leading Nikkita Oliver by only around 1,400 votes. The top two candidates will advance through to November’s General Election.

You can read more about Durkan our CHS Q&A with the candidate here and our interview with Moon here. CHS spoke with Oliver about her candidacy here.

For the complete results including Port of Seattle and Seattle school board positions, visit kingcounty.gov.