15 years — and $8M or so extra — later, a look at North Capitol Hill’s new Station 22

Faced with old facilities and the first signs of growth set to transform the city in Seattle’s tech-era boom, voters in 2003 approved the Fire Facilities and Emergency Response Levy and plan to rebuild 32 fire stations in neighborhoods across Seattle. A new Station 22 was forecast to cost $4.85 million under estimated construction costs at the time. 15 years later, the state of the art E Roanoke station hosted neighbors for a Saturday open house and peace pole planting.

Station 22’s final price tag? More than $13 million.

Completed late last year and back in operation since December, the new station Saturday showcased its larger, environmentally friendly facility for neighbors and fire truck aficionados.

The new Station 22 has more than doubled the space of the original, expanding the 1964-built structure from about 4,000 square feet to 10,000 square feet. The two-story station designed by Weinstein A/U has a concrete hose tower, and a brick and glass façade and is designed to be eco-friendly, with a LEED gold certification, including solar panels, an underground stormwater cistern which will provide 100% of the station’s non-drinking water needs, permeable pavers in public areas, and a host of other sustainable features. Continue reading

Two to hospital after Harvard Ave I-5 onramp head-on

Two people were taken to Harborview with serious injuries Tuesday morning after a vehicle collided with another head-on near the northbound I-5 onramp from Harvard Ave E.

Seattle Fire and police responded to the crash just before 10:30 AM in the 2700 block of Harvard Ave E just below Roanoke where northbound vehicular traffic must cross two lanes of southbound traffic to enter the freeway.

Seattle Fire reports that both drivers were in stable condition after being rescued from their vehicles and rushed to the hospital with serious injuries. Animal control was also called to the scene to assist with a dog in one of the crashed vehicles.

The area was closed to traffic during the response. Metro 49 was rerouted during the crash but back on regular service as of noon. Continue reading

North Capitol Hill crew moves back in after Fire Station 22 expansion

(Image: SFD)

Moving day (Image: SFD)

The firefighters of  E Roanoke’s Station 22 are back home this week after a nearly two-year construction project to expand and overhaul the facility.

Crews have been working from a temporary station setup in Eastlake during the demolition and construction project that began in early 2016. Construction had been planned to be wrapped up in summer. The project is part of a 2003 levy vote to fund construction at 32 fire stations around the city, and construct a handful of other facilities. At the time of the vote, construction was anticipated to start in 2007 but the project was delayed for the state’s Route 520 project. At the time of the levy, the anticipated budget for a new Station 22 was $4.8 million. Cost estimates ballooned to $11.7 million. Some of the rise can be attributed to changes in the construction environment from 13 years ago, officials said, including changes to building codes, prevailing wage increases, and inflation. The $11.7 million total price tag also included around $2 million in contingency budget — we’re checking to find out where the final total came in. UPDATE: A department spokesperson tells CHS the final planned budget was $13.352 million but a final official cost isn’t known.

The new station has more than doubled the space of the original, expanding the 1964-built structure from about 4,000 square feet to 10,000 square feet. The new, two-story station has a concrete hose tower, and a brick and glass façade and is designed to be eco-friendly, with a LEED gold certification, including solar panels, an underground stormwater cistern which will provide 100% of the station’s non-drinking water needs, permeable pavers in public areas, and a host of other sustainable features.

The station has been home to a single engine, an officer and three firefighters on duty at any given time, with a total staff of 16 firefighters assigned to the station working in four shifts. SFD says that mix won’t change. The fire house is headquarters for Engine 22 and SFD’s Communications and Command Van.

A community party to celebrate the reopening is being planned for early 2018.

Youth jail protest comes to Mayor Murray’s North Capitol Hill neighborhood

Ed Murray’s North Capitol Hill home Tuesday night was the target for a group of protesters calling for the mayor and City Hall to stop construction of the county’s planned upgraded Children and Family Justice Center on 12th Ave.

A group of around 50 protesters lined 10th Ave E near E Boston near the mayor’s home to call for a last-ditch effort to reject what is expected to be approval of city construction permits for the facility, a decision the protesters say is slated for Thursday:

No New Youth Jail Action Alert
Call the Mayor, County Executive, and City Council Today!
**Mayor Murray, Dow Constantine, the City of Seattle, and King County intend to give our children and families a new children jail for the holidays.**
On December 22nd the Seattle Department of Construction and Inspection will release its decision about whether it will grant permits to King County to build a new children’s jail in Seattle.

Wednesday night, protesters chanted for no new youth jail and reminded the mayor they know where he lives. “We’re here outside of Mayor Murray’s house to let him know that we’re not going away, we are paying attention, and he can’t do something like allow his city government to pass this permit right before the holidays,” protest organizer Bana Abera said. “Obviously, we are paying attention.”

“We want to let him know that we are vigilant. And especially with him being up for reelection, we are going to make sure that he knows, if he doesn’t stop this jail, this will be the main issue of his campaign.”

Earlier this week, Murray and King County Executive Dow Constantine were targeted by protesters at the announcement designating Washington as a “hate free state.” Continue reading

From toothpaste to pizza, Little Lago Italian grocery now open in Portage Bay

The northern neighborhoods around Capitol Hill take their local markets seriously. There’s a celebration in Portage Bay, Roanoke, and Montlake this week as Little Lago has finally opened its doors.

“We are there to serve the neighborhood’s needs,” owner Carla Leonardi told CHS this summer as the restaurant owner worked through the arduous city permitting process to get the new project open. “There will be cooking classes, wine maker events, community services, air for bike tires, dog friendly outdoor parking, dry pasta comparison tastings, and toothpaste.” Continue reading

Old timer Pagliacci adds ‘slice bar’ as great pizza rush of 2016 stretches to North Capitol Hill

orig_locations_2_5_miller_exterior

(Image: Pagliacci)

Thanks to a small 2015 blip in the Capitol Hill pizza economy, the relatively high profit margin, relatively easy to produce culinary creation has become a $15 minimum wage talking point. We’re not sure where this fits into the conversation other than, yup, pizza remains hot on Capitol Hill.

One of the key early outposts in Seattle pizza giant Pagliacci’s ascendancy as king of the city’s delivery pack has undergone an overhaul and is celebrating Saturday, May 14th with free slices. Here’s what’s up at Capitol Hill’s 2400 10th Ave. E Pagliacci location, the Miller store:

Pagliacci Pizza just opened a new slice bar at their Miller store and to celebrate the location will give away slices on Saturday, May 14th, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. There is a limit of two slices per person. In addition to adding a slice bar and an expanded dining room the store now serves beer and wine. Doors open daily at 11 a.m.

The 10th and E Miller location had been a delivery-only kitchen since opening in 1992. According to Pagliacci, the company planned the location as its first deliver-only site but delays ended up costing it its place in Pagliacci history. “The space seemed so big that we agreed to rent out the front to a former employee who wanted to open a cafe,” the store’s information page reads. “The former employee got cold feet (about the cafe) and over time, we found we definitely needed the space to meet the high volume of orders in Capitol Hill.” Pagliacci’s first call center was operated at the location before Pagliacci Support Central was consolidated at the company’s E Pike headquarters. CHS wrote here in 2013 about Pagliacci’s 30 years on Broadway and the company’s E Pike mission control center. Pagliacci says it plans to open its 26th location around Seattle by the end of the year.

Meanwhile, CHS has reported about other Hill pizza veterans joining the wave of young bucks bringing more pizza than ever before to Capitol Hill’s food and drink offerings. With its upgrades, Pagliacci now pulls North Capitol Hill into the 2016 pizza wars. Your move, Padrino’s.

 

North Capitol Hill’s Fire Station 22 set for 15-month rebuild

fs22-renderingCapitol Hill’s northern firefighting outpost, Fire Station 22 will undergo a 15-month rebuild starting in March.

On E Roanoke right by the I-5 onramp, the new station will be more than double the size of the existing one, as it expands from about 4,000 square feet to 10,000 square feet. The new, two-story station will have a concrete hose tower, and a brick and glass façade. It’s also designed to be eco-friendly, with a LEED gold certification, and includes solar panels, an underground stormwater cistern which will provide 100% of the station’s non-drinking water needs, permeable pavers in public areas and a host of other sustainable features. Also, a London Plane tree will be preserved.

After firefighters are relocated to a temporary setup, demolition should begin. The city plans for construction to be complete by June 2017. Continue reading

Capitol Hill’s northern fire outpost readies for bigger new building

Screen Shot 2014-05-23 at 9.58.08 AMIt’s been a decade in the making, but the city is finally ready to replace Capitol Hill’s cramped and crumbling Seattle Fire Department Station 22.

Back in 2003 Seattle voters approved a $167 million levy to repair or rebuild the city’s 32 neighborhood fire stations (although the final budget has nearly doubled since then – PDF). After 50 years of service, the permits are in to demolish Capitol Hill’s little northern fire department outpost at 10th and Roanoke.

Station 22 currently houses the department’s incident response team as well as Engine 22. The new $11.7 million station, to be built at the same busy intersection, will continue to house both units in a larger space. Continue reading