To boost the Seattle dream of an electric car in every affordable garage, public charging stations being added across city, including one on Capitol Hill

(Image: Seattle.gov)

Elon Musk wouldn’t be pleased with the delivery timeline but Capitol Hill is lined up to host one of the city’s 20 planned public electric car chargers hoped to, um, jumpstart the adoption of electric vehicles in Seattle and make the automobiles more accessible.

Seattle City Light is making plans to install 18 more of the DC Fast Chargers for electric vehicles at 10 to 15 curbside and off-street locations across the city one of which will be located in the Capitol Hill neighborhood.

“We feel that as a public utility we have a responsibility to our ratepayers to invest in and implement solutions that support sustainability,” Jenny Levesque, community outreach manager for Seattle City Light, said at Monday’s Pike/Pine Urban Neighborhood Council meeting. Continue reading

A memorial to Max Richards, the last* pedestrian killed on a Capitol Hill street

A memorial to Max Richards is a reminder of his wife Marilyn Black’s love for the man who died this week in 2016 after being struck by a driver while crossing Belmont Ave E with his dog.

The flowers are also a marker of a stretch of time that hopefully continues — a pedestrian hasn’t been killed on Capitol Hill streets in two years. Continue reading

Seven District 3 projects make final cut in citizen street and park work budgeting process

A $83,000 new marked crossing at 14th and Aloha made the cut — so did a $90,000 sidewalk project on Summit.

Results are in for the final vote on Seattle’s 2018 round of citizen budgeting process for street and park improvements.

Thanks to excellent marketing — proponents printed flyers and hung them from street signs at the crossing — the 14th and Aloha project had the highest level of support in the District 3 group, tallying nearly 300 votes.

The seven District 3 projects that garnered the most “Your Voice, Your Choice” votes are below: Continue reading

SDOT quiet on decision to back off left-turn signals at busy Broadway intersection

Seattle Fire responds after a driver struck a woman at the intersection in February 2017 (Image: CHS)

This morning, CHS reported on some major progress in making a vital east-west stretch of Capitol Hill roadway connection to Capitol Hill Station safer for everybody — especially pedestrians.

But a major component of recent City of Seattle planning won’t be part of this summer’s project. Already one of the busiest spots for pedestrian traffic in the city, the intersection of Broadway and E Olive Way/John just outside the station’s main entrance is more crowded with foot traffic than ever. But the city isn’t including planned signal changes at the intersection to cut down on collisions — and near misses — in this summer’s work. Continue reading

Work set to begin to make John/Thomas intersections safer from Capitol Hill Station to Miller Park

After two years of citizen advocacy, a series of pedestrian-focused improvements is coming to the John/Thomas Street corridor with construction set to begin in early July .

David Seater, co leader of Central Seattle Greenways, began calling for the project two years ago. Seater said he walks along the corridor frequently, and finds it challenging to cross either of the streets, which tend to be high on traffic, and low on places to cross.

“I felt like it shouldn’t be that tough,” he said. Continue reading

Final vote for 2018 Your Voice, Your Choice District 3 projects includes crossing at 14th/Aloha, Summit Ave sidewalk work

More than 130 ideas for District 3 have been narrowed to a handful in a community process CHS documented in all of its awkward glory here. Now the sometimes awkward, occasionally twisted Your Voice, Your Choice citizen budgeting process for street and park improvements is down to it final phase for the year.

Through July 16th, District 3 citizens can cast their votes for three of ten finalist projects that range from a $16,100 plan to improve the crossing at 14th and Aloha on Capitol Hill to a $90,000 proposal to repair the sidewalk on Summit Ave between Madison and Spring on First Hill. Continue reading

Search for new Seattle Department of Transportation head begins

Mayor Jenny Durkan is searching for a new director to lead the Seattle Department of Transportation. “From filling potholes to paving streets to modifying traffic signals and building out a network of bike lanes and sidewalks to serve all ages and abilities, the next director will lead the agency at a critical time,” the city announcement for the search reads.

City Hall is opening up a survey process to collect community feedback on priorities for the hire:

The ideal candidate must demonstrate qualities and characteristics that reflect our diverse communities of Seattle. Our community members have a critical role to play to ensure their voice is heard. Community input will be utilized to target recruitment efforts when evaluating applicant’s knowledge, skills, and abilities. This information will also be used to develop interview questions.

You can take the survey here.

“With a number of significant projects in the pipeline, our next SDOT leader must be ready to deliver on investments and protect taxpayer dollars,” Durkan said. “Our residents and businesses expect our officials to make progress and deliver results, and this administration will continue to be accountable to the people we serve,”

Goran Sparrman has served in in the interim since Scott Kubly stepped away last year as the Durkan administration moved in. On Hill, some SDOT issues like a plan to speed up the First Hill Streetcar will likely be taken care of before any new department chief is hired. Others like safe bike routes between the Hill and downtown will probably still be looking for leadership as the new hire takes the job.

CHS Pics | Melrose Ave’s new ‘Poem Dazzle’ community crosswalks

The Melrose Promenade group threw a spur of the moment party Thursday night after a Seattle Department of Transportation work crew needed only one night to install new “community crosswalks on the street the organization is dedicated to improving.

“Thank you to our artist Sara Snedeker for her design, Seattle Department of Transportation and Berger Partnership PS for their partnership, everyone in the community for helping select this public art, and Promenade team member Patrick Jones for always being in the right place at the right time with his camera!,” the Melrose Promenade note about the community party read. Continue reading

Weigh in on one-way idea and more at Melrose Ave open house

Rendering of the coming soon community crosswalk (Images: Melrose Promenade)

Seattle Department of Transportation and Melrose Promenade community group representatives will be on hand Tuesday night for an open house to gather ideas and feedback on a potential slate of improvements lined up to “reimagine” Capitol Hill’s Melrose Ave. It’s a list that sounds good for most any street — but especially one where SDOT has found an eager community partner, killer view of downtown fro across I-5, and a lot of potential:

  • traffic calming
  • sidewalk upgrades
  • street crossings
  • public space
  • lane redesign
  • wayfinding signs
  • lighting
  • seating
  • bike facilities
  • pavement repair

Open House | Melrose Promenade Project

“Our project goals build off the promenade vision to connect people and places while improving safety. The corridor is a key walking and biking connection in our citywide network,” SDOT says about the project.

“We’re engaging with the community this spring to learn what’s working and what’s not with the corridor, and to better understand what people want us to invest in and where,” the Melrose Promenade group wrote about the open house. The biggest change being considered as a new initiative for the group is the possible reconfiguration of Melrose to one-way traffic between Pike and Pine.

In 2016, about $90,000 in Melrose enhancements made the city budget.

The Melrose Promenade group has also pushed forward with a plan to add colorful community crosswalks on the street. That work should be scheduled soon this spring, SDOT says, weather permitting.

Citizen-budgeters ponder Capitol Hill improvements at ‘Your Voice, Your Choice’ project meeting

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On Thursday night, a small group of Capitol Hill denizens gathered in a fourth floor classroom at Seattle Central College to mull over project ideas submitted to the city’s Your Voice, Your Choice neighborhood grant process. The 20 or so participants split up into two groups, representing north and south, to rate the 42 publicly solicited proposals for District 3, narrowed down from 134-plus.

The projects were assessed by two criteria: need and community benefit.

It was an informal exercise in face-to-face, block-to-block, small-bore civic engagement. The groups briskly discussed each proposal, jotting down their scores. In attendance were Seattle Central professors and students, local apartment dwellers, and planning-savvy wonks like Ryan Packer, senior editor of The Urbanist, whose name tag sticker read, appropriately, “Ryan The Urbanist.” Continue reading