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Bank glass busted on Capitol Hill — again

The US Bank at Broadway and John suffered shattered glass Saturday night as an attack on its windows and doors left a mess. Meanwhile, similar damage to the Bank of America at 14th and Madison was also reported. UPDATE: The B of A was not damaged.

Slog has posted an account and pictures of the US Bank damage that happened sometime around 11p Saturday and reportedly involved a person in a black hoodie using something that looked like an ice pick to damage the bank.

We don’t have further details on the Bank of America incident but SPD was called to the scene around the same time and there are reports of damage to that building’s glass also. UPDATE: No damage at B of A. We’ll check with SPD about the callout.

Earlier this year, you might recall, we reported on a series of incidents involving broken windows and doors at Capitol Hill banks including this April attack on the Chase branch on Broadway.

Saturday’s damage comes as the largest crowds yet gathered downtown for the ongoing Occupy Seattle protests and hundreds camped overnight in Westlake Park.

(Image: Occupy Seattle)

 

Thanks to @suburban_war for the pictures from the scene at Broadway and John.

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Xavier Lopez Jr.
10 years ago

This article is amazingly irresponsible and creates a connection in readers minds between two things that have no visible or logical reason to be connected–but then that is why the writer merely hinted at guilt by mentioning the occupation, right? Okay, so you have any proof that it was an occupier? You say it was someone in a black hoodie–well, the occupiers hang in groups–agents provocateurs they hang in solitude and bust things, cause damage and incite violence and generally try to smear non-violent movements. This article is absolutely irresponsible and I would ask that the barely literate person who wrote this re-edit so that the last paragraph and photograph be taken out–because they serve no purpose except to create trouble for a group that has been nothing but peaceful and to scare those that are not part of Occupy. Seriously, sleazy tactic–way beneath CHS.

calhoun
10 years ago

Here we go again. It was only a matter of time before the sleazeball “anarchists” resurfaced. They accomplish exactly nothing.

I agree this criminal action last night is unrelated to the Occupy Seattle movement downtown. I’m actually surprised that the protests have remained so peaceful…so far…I wonder what the leaders of that protest are doing to keep the anarchists away. Whatever it is, I hope that things remain calm, as any violence or vandalism would put a quick end to the protest.

suburban_war
10 years ago

The story pretty clearly states that the “largest crowds yet” were “gathered downtown”. I’m sure any reader of this blog knows the difference between Capitol Hill and Downtown. On Friday night, the protestors (well some of them at least) were marching up Broadway, with police escort, and without incident as far as I know.

jseattle
10 years ago

People can sort it out just fine. Thousands marched, hundreds camped, one guy broke a window on Capitol Hill. And maybe another.

Feedback
10 years ago

I’m afraid the only solution is for US Bank and Bank of America to close all of their branches and cease operations. Banks had been useful in the past, but now they are simply not wanted.

I expect an apology and a notice of closure in the next 8-10 business days.

maybe?
10 years ago

But maybe it’s time that Chase, B of A and US Bank take a hint. Change your practices or pack up! I know Wells Fargo is one of the big banks, but you notice that no one is taking the protests to their branches. Maybe that’s because they aren’t hiking every fee that hasn’t had a restriction or limitation put on it. Bust the banks, but do it by pulling all of your money out. If you haven’t already switched over to a credit union and are tired of increasing fee’s that only benefit a CEO in another state, do it on November 5th.

CapHillMax
10 years ago

Actually Wells is instituting a $3/monthly debit card fee. It is quite odd that they are escaping some of the ire.

JimS.
10 years ago

There is no “but” to rationalize property destruction. It’s wrong, period. And let’s not forget, these so-called anarchist children who busted up the windows on Broadway last time– all that happened well before any of these banks recently announced their intentions to institute these new fees. So, nice try blaming it on new fees, but that’s BS.

Having said that– absolutely, the best way to “take revenge” on these greedy banks is to move your accounts to credit unions– not to break their windows. That won’t rally anyone to the cause.

zeebleoop
10 years ago

“But maybe it’s time that Chase, B of A and US Bank take a hint.”

do you really think a couple of broken windows at one of their branches offices is making the boards at those two banks shake in their shoes? i doubt it will even impact their insurance premium in any significant way and those windows will be fixed by monday start of business.

and go ahead and close your account. again, your little deposits likely mean nothing to them; hence the reason for the fees. where these banks get their biggest profits is from the millions of dollars that flow through via their large corporate customers.

maybe?
10 years ago

I didn’t blame it on the fee’s…But nice try putting words in my mouth. I simply pointed out that they WILL continue to have problems until they change how they do business. It doesn’t mean I agree with the people doing it. It doesn’t mean I have justified it for them. Simply saying don’t be stupid and think things will just miraculously go away with out the real source of disdain being addressed. But nice try!

Yo
Yo
10 years ago

Duh– Maybe?, they’re not “fee’s”, they’re FEES. Learn how to properly use an apostrophe, how ’bout it? And it’s not every time you need to form a plural. Did you flunk 5th grade grammar?

Zeebleoop, I disagree. Taken by themselves, it’s true– most of our accounts don’t amount to squat. But added together, it begins to add up. Where do you think the banks get the funds to lend to their big corporate customers? From their reserves– which are comprised, in part, by our small deposits.

maybe?
10 years ago

You must have graduated and have a degree in being a giant asshole. Excuse me for purpose fully putting and apostrophe in fees to try to imply that they actually do belong to the bank in their thinking. Glad that someone made you the spelling and punctuation police on a public blog. You must have gotten up and put your big boy pants on today huh? Now move onto another blog and point some other needless thing that you are going to take as a typo, whether it is or not and make the discussion about that. You lead such an important life.

CorporatePoliticsSuck
10 years ago

I support this action and I hope it is connected to Occupy Seattle. Fuck you, Capitol Hill snobs who think it’s okay to destroy human lives, but not a fucking window.

Yo
Yo
10 years ago

Yes, I’m a giant asshole.
But not an illiterate giant asshole.

Xavier Lopez Jr.
10 years ago

It does not absolve at all that would read: “Saturday’s damage appears to be completely unrelated to the large crowds yet gathered downtown for the ongoing Occupy Seattle protests and hundreds camped overnight in Westlake Park.”

umvue
10 years ago

… straight girls goading gay guys to hit on their dates. Go back to Bellevue.

maybe?
10 years ago

The misplacement of an apostrophe hardly qualifies one as being illiterate. I do have one last question for you though. Just how much vinegar and water does it take to make one like you function on a daily basis?

Ben
Ben
10 years ago

Xavier, I totally agree. Jseattle, you did nothing to support your argument, but merely reaffirmed Xavier’s accusation of trying to quietly inject guilt by coincidence. Whether that was intentional on your part or not, that is the effect; especially by adding the photograph. It would be like pasting a photo of a political figure you don’t like and adding, “Not that they are related at all, but they WERE nearby. Isn’t that interesting? *wink*”. If you are indeed attempting journalism, you really should consider editing the “article”, as it is, in reality, unrelated aside from circumstantial, subjective observation. Summary: Bad form. Bad taste. Shame.

Ben
Ben
10 years ago

Busting a million window isn’t worse than destroying a human life. But is it in any way relate? Absolutely…not! Just, no. It’s stupid. There are lots of things that are worse than busting windows. You gonna go around busting everybody’s windows every time something bad happens in the world because YOU don’t agree with them in some completely unrelated aspect? Now, who’s the snob?
We don’t want our neighbor to look like crap. We don’t want glass all over the place. We don’t want idiotic, childish, tantrum-caused chaos. Adults acting like children and lashing out at anything around them because they aren’t happy, regardless of the consequences and effects on others: That’s snobbery.
We may not like the what the banks are doing, either. But why take it out on them in a way that it hurts us as well. You might not mind looking like an irrational toddler, but I do and, unfortunately, it gets associated with all of us. Grow up.

CorporatePoliticsSuck
10 years ago

Why Occupy Westlake? Because the surrounding area is Seattle’s Wall Street.

In the 90s, corporations like Microsoft and Starbucks took over the city. What used to be a working class town has become a glitzy emerald city designed for the 1%, not for us. The city banked its economic future on attracting bankers and corporate elites to downtown, through the convention center, high-end tourism, and high tech capitalism. Westlake Park used to be a civic center, full of festivals, protests, and gatherings. Pine Street used to be closed to cars, and the park went right up to the edge of the mall. The wealthy Nordstrom family demanded that it be opened to cars to improve their business, and community groups fought hard against this because it broke up the city’s last remaining civic space.

The city government paid millions of dollars in taxpayer money to help build Pacific Place and the Nordstrom flagship store. They used millions of dollars of Housing and Urban Development money intended for affordable housing; instead of helping to deal with Seattle’s lack of housing, they gave this money to developers and to Nordstroms. This was a big scandal in the 90s that polarized the city.

Now the police and private corporate security teams harass homeless youth who live at Westlake every day. They racially profile working class people of color who hang out on 3rd Ave and who use the nearby bus stops on their way to West Seattle, the Central District, and the South End. It’s no surprise that may homeless youth have become the core of this movement – they know what’s up.

Mayor McGinn is so intent on moving Occupy Seattle out of Westlake because he realizes that our occupation is reigniting heavy debates about Seattle’s identity and future. Is this a city where working class people, people of color, homeless folks, queer folks, artists, and economic refugees can thrive? Or is this a city run by Boeing, Microsoft, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Amazon, and their Wall Street friends?

This is not just about our right to camp. It is about taking back downtown from these corporations, as a base of operations to eventually take back the rest of the city. Eventually we will reoccupy the Central District, Capitol Hill, and other neighborhoods where wall street- backed developers have pushed out the working class. By holding our base at Westlake we are already fighting this process of gentrification. The 1% can’t party at the convention center, or shop at Nordstrom without having to deal with US. Let’s keep it that way!

For the research backing these arguments, check out the book Securing the Spectacular City: The Politics of Revitalization and Homelessness in Downtown Seattle by Timothy Gibson.

umvue
10 years ago

Yeah, man. Let’s make Seattle a working class town again. Reopen Yesler’s mill then all the men can be lumberjacks and all the women can be whores.

etaoin shrdlu
10 years ago

Very interesting. Thanks for the historical background. Gibson’s book sounds fascinating.

Ben
Ben
10 years ago

Basically, you made a connection that was NOT there, whether you THINK people can tell the difference or not, YOU linked them. Additionally, to further your discredit, the window thing has been happening for a long time – long before there was an “occupy” anything. Again, extreme (FOX-like) irresponsibility.

ERF
ERF
10 years ago

I’m a lumberjack, and I’m OK! I sleep all night and I work all day!
….
umvue, I’m all in! Who need all this computer stuff anyway?

ERF
ERF
10 years ago

Oh, and I read that book. It was written by someone that never lived here reading newspapers. It was all conjecture and theory to advance the view that capitalism is bad.

kyle
10 years ago

The anarchists will happily attach themselves to pretty much any movement. The term publicity whores comes to mind. This whole thing is becoming comedic and so lame.

Underline
10 years ago

I see nothing wrong with the article. Can’t understand this (over)reaction. The information was relevant and if you’re going to attack someone please don’t do it in such a hysterical manner, as it undercuts any arguments you present. This blog is a great resource to the community. Your immature comments are not.

calhoun
10 years ago

I was going to write a calm, reasoned response to your little tirade, but Ben has done this for me.

Anyway, it’s useless to try and debate with someone as self-righteous and irrational as you.

calhoun
10 years ago

This anarchist/radical left goal of “taking back” the city is really hilarious. Not gonna happen…but even if it did, the city would then be a hollow shell of derelict, abandoned buildings. Is this what you want? Great goal!

Seattle’s downtown is a vibrant urban neighborhood, especially now that there are many more people living there than in the past. Perhaps the “evil corporations” are partly responsible for this…if so, I say: “Thank you!”

calhoun
10 years ago

Can someone please explain the idea that credit unions are somehow morally superior to banks? Don’t they have fees too? Don’t they loan money to anyone who qualifies, businesses, etc? Are their interest rates generally lower than banks? Don’t their upper-level management people get well-paid?

I am just curious about this. It seems to be an accepted fact that credit unions are pure and wonderful. Are they really?

a native
10 years ago

Seriously? Were you even in seattle in the 90’s? Westlake was a shithole, pike and pine were absolutely horrible. How long was jc penny boarded up? You’re insane if you think we lost something with the redev of downtown. move to Detroit if you long for the days of yesteryear, that’s what the vibe was here before we were picked up out of the gutter by mayor Rice and corporate America.

Eliza
10 years ago

Seattle’s ‘Wall Street’ is about 1-5 blocks south of Westlake, where the huge Wells Fargo, Columbia Tower, former WaMu tower, and Bank of California (now Union Bank), One and Two Union Square, and USBank City Centre buildings are. Westlake is surrounded by shopping and tourists. 3rd Avenue between Pike and Pine is filled with people buying and selling drugs (I know because I see it everyday) and it makes the people who really ARE waiting for the bus to get to their homes or jobs uncomfortable and unsafe. I welcome police presence down there.

And from what I understand USBank is the ONLY large bank NOT instituting debit card fees. Wells Fargo got busted for racial discrimination with housing loans, BofA bought out all those bad Countrywide loans and their clients are losing their homes because of BofA’s mismanagement of the loans after buying them, WaMu was dirtier than any of us knew and Chase refused to work with so many WaMu mortgage holders once they bought it out for pennies on the dollar. The only big bank NOT in need of the big TARP bail out was USBank. They were and still are solid, but were required by the Fed to take bailout money too, so as not to scare the citizens into thinking they were going to crumble too. But no, they’re not going to loan money to businesses that aren’t a safe bet right now. The banks who are stable stayed that way by being conservative. They were thinking about the long term and not on just making money by loaning money (which is what banks exist to do).

And you guys are right, the little account holders like you and me don’t make money for the big banks. They do make their fees on the large commercial and corporate clients with big loans and lines of credit. The same companies that employ you and me. Without big banks we would have no regional ballet company, we’d have fewer theatres, schools like Bastyr wouldn’t have their beautiful new LEED Platinum housing units, big employers like shipyards wouldn’t be able to buy new boats when they need to, local businesses who have been part of Seattle for 100 years wouldn’t still have their doors open. Big banks aren’t always the enemy. I’m not saying we (the 99%) aren’t being neglected and abused by corporations (which is being allowed by OUR ‘representatives’, people we elected in to office), but I am saying that even the most ‘free-thinking’ and anti-corporate people out there depend on big banks (whether they realize it or not) to keep their community going.

anarcho
10 years ago

What are you talking about? There have been anarchists at every day of the occupation. If you had ever gone, you would have seen people happily accepting information from anarchists. You would have seen anarchists participating in the general assemblies. etc.

Ben
Ben
10 years ago

If you cannot see that the information was irrelevant (as seen in your refusal to explain how it is), nor how these unsubstantiated claims seem to be driving your lashing out with calling us with actual substance to our stance as “immature”, I truly feel sorry for you.

Underline
10 years ago

I am not lashing out at you. I do not doubt your intentions, but there is no substantive basis to call the staff members “barely literate” or to “shame” someone for writing an article that arranges facts in such a way that you find unfair. How self-important can you be.. And it does undermine any argument you present, whether you are conscious of it or not. If you are going to shout about your high journalistic standards then why don’t you begin with addressing your own weak rhetoric..

Ben
Ben
10 years ago

I will concede that “barely literate” was uncalled for. I don’t believe that was me, though (please forgive my not re-reading at the moment). “Shame”, however, I do believe is supported by my opinion that it is a shameful act to report in a manner that I believe to be highly irresponsible. Obviously, they can read and write; I just happen to think that it was done in a shameful way. This is not purely my opinion, it stems from the fact that no logical line is followed to necessitate that statement being there at all. It could just as easily be replaced with something like, “Saturday’s damage comes as a nearby softball game ended minutes beforehand”. It’s circumstantial. One may be able to find a relation in that banks are a subject in both cases, but that is just as meaningful as people from a ball game being in the same vicinity.

Undeline
10 years ago

Ben, I appreciate your response and I can certainly see your point, but I still believe there was a thematic link that justified the presentation. Furthermore, I cannot discern a hidden agenda on the part of the contributors to hurt the cause, which would lead me to believe the connection it made was simply a sensitivity that was overlooked. I suppose my error is the assumption that most readers are informed, which (I agree with you) would lead the presentation to be misleading to those who are not. Still, I think people on the comment boards don’t need to take things so personally. These people are just doing their jobs.

oneway
10 years ago

Don’t have time for reading this whole thread… and I’m a little late to the game on this thread, but is onto the truth: if you don’t like the fees for debit card usage, etc., go ahead and take your low-balance business elsewhere. Seriously, neither B of A or Chase could give a damn.

They don’t make money servicing low-balance checking accounts, and they really only do so as a loss-leader for acquiring higher-balance customers.