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Good news for Capitol Hill homeless youth nonprofit

On October 10th, we broke the lousy news: Capitol Hill homeless youth nonprofit Peace for the Streets by Kids from the Streets was having a hard time paying its Summit Ave rent.

By the 16th, Elaine Simons, director of the nearly 20-year-old organization, told CHS more than $30,000 had already been raised. Monday, Mayor Mike McGinn’s office announced that a source for a big seed grant has been identified:

Today we announced a $20,000 matching grant for Peace for the Streets by Kids from the Streets (PSKS), an organization for homeless teens and young adults that has struggled financially recently. 

For every dollar the Seattle community donates to PSKS, the City will match it – up to $20,000. Let’s help this incredible organization get a head start on 2013. I know that Seattle can pull together, as our city has done time and time again, to support important local efforts to help those in need.

It’s good news for PSKS — and the community. The organization provides support and services to homeless youth and “daily drop-in hours where kids can get dry and warm, and have a hot meal.” To help unlock the full value of the grant, you can give to PSKS through the Seattle Foundation site.


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PT
PT
8 years ago

What a relief. I knew our community would come around. As a member of The Backpack Project who was fortunate enough to meet these folks, it is great news.

Elaine Simons
8 years ago

Thanks Backpack Project!
You are a great community resource!

calhoun
8 years ago

I would like someone to explain the difference between these two agencies, which are just a few blocks from one another. Don’t they basically do the same thing? Why are they both necessary?

Ms. Simons?

Seriously
8 years ago

I won’t speak for PSKS, but my understanding is that PSKS provides a much lower barrier for services than a place like the Orion Center (YouthCare). It provides a vital source for people who might not be quite ready for the higher barrier services that are provided by YouthCare.

calhoun
8 years ago

What kind of “barriers” are you talking about?

Seriously
8 years ago

Barriers = you must be clean and sober for so many days/months, or you must be working or in job training. PSKS offers people who are at a little bit lower place in their life and need different services than YouthCare can provide. Also the reality is that we need a multi-tiered system to help these people navigate their way back into society. Sometimes a person will not be able to respond to the culture of one organization and needs to have other options. The types of services provided at each organization is different. There isn’t a one size fits all solution to this problem. Also PSKS has a higher age threshold than YouthCare. I believe YC ages out at 21, PSKS at 25. PSKS is a bit less structured which is what some people need at first before they move into a more structured setting like YC. Portland does this way more efficiently than we do in Seattle and with far more collaboration and administrative sharing between organizations too. There tends to be a lot more competition and ego involved in the organizations in Seattle to the detriment of the young people who desperately need their services.

lovinit
8 years ago

PSKS also allows dogs–some of the only family have. PSKS does a lot around involvement. If participants become involved they become part of the core to vote on issues around the organization giving their board direct input in decisions. So you don’t just take… you begin to feel more connected to PSKS, and that connection and family feeling pulls you out off the streets over time.

calhoun
8 years ago

I appreciate the last two comments….you have convinced me that there is a need for both PSKS and Orion.

But I hope that PSKS is putting a major emphasis on getting their kids clean&sober, and in getting them into a job. Otherwise, they are just enabling.