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Innovative Stockbox to open First Hill Grocery this summer

first-hill-picAn innovative company created to offer “fresh produce, meal solutions, and grocery staples” in “urban areas” is coming to First Hill to open a 2,000 square-foot market at 9th and James.

Stockbox announced Tuesday that its First Hill Grocery will open later this summer near Harborview.

The First Hill neighborhood has been without a major grocery store since the sudden closure of M Street Grocery in January 2011.

Stockbox’s first store in the Seattle area opened in South Park in summer 2012. By November, it had already announced a slate of changes based on buying behavior and customer requests. The company continues to be involved with civic issues related to the availability of nutritious, affordable food in lower income and urban areas of the city.

The full announcement on the new First Hill store is below.


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Seattle entrepreneurs, Carrie Ferrence and Jacqueline Gjurgevich, are preparing to open the second Stockbox Neighborhood Grocery this summer, in the First Hill neighborhood of Seattle.  Stockbox is working to build a network of community-based grocery stores to increase access to fresh, affordable and good food choices within urban areas.  This second store will be located near Harborview Hospital in a retail property at the corner of 9th and James and follows their prototype store in 2011 and first store in South Park in 2012.  The launch also follows a successful raise of $550,000 at the beginning of 2013, which took their total funds raised to $850,000.

“We are excited to open our second store in the First Hill neighborhood because of the strong market potential and social need. The neighborhood is one of the most dense and walk-dependent communities in the city and hasn’t had a grocery store since M Street Grocery closed in 2011. The community has been actively asking for a local resource for good food and has been supportive of our outreach and engagement efforts. Our work continues to demonstrate the incredible interest from neighbors to bring good food back into the community” said Carrie Ferrence, CEO and co-founder of Stockbox.

This new store location is an extension of the work that Stockbox has already done to increase access to good food inside urban communities, which began with a prototype store in the Delridge community in Fall 2011 and the launch of the company’s first store in Seattle’s South Park neighborhood last summer. The First Hill store will have an expanded footprint and will boast a larger selection of fresh foods and meal solutions – at an accessible price.

“Most families buy the same five to ten items each week, so they only need to go to a big grocery store once or twice a month,” said Jacqueline Gjurgevich, co-founder of Stockbox.  “Stockbox focuses on the fresh foods customers buy most often and tailors the inventory selection and store experience to represent the face and the need of each community.”

About Stockbox

Stockbox’s mission is to invest in communities, where good food and relationships can thrive. With plans to open a network of stores across the city, and eventually beyond, Stockbox stores are designed to offer a welcoming and delightful experience.  Stockbox also partners with non-profits, like The Hope Heart Institute and Sea Mar, to provide educational materials and activities to promote the benefits of good food. Stockbox’s efforts to become the new neighborhood grocery have gained national and international attention, including coverage in the New York Times and Fast Company, and recognition by the White House. The Stockbox founders also have spoken at national conferences, on the topics of food access, community development, and creativity in small business financing.

Stockbox will post regular updates on the First Hill store’s development at www.stockboxgrocers.com  In addition, they will be reaching out to neighbors to glean additional insight on how to design inventory selection at the First Hill store and working with strategic partners to launch integrated programs and raise additional funds through investment and donations.

 

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Manny
Manny
7 years ago

What’s so innovative about a new grocery store? Just wondering.

Dod
Dod
7 years ago
Reply to  Manny

Read “About Stockbox” above.

TWCB
TWCB
7 years ago
Reply to  Dod

Manny,

Maybe you could find someone to read this article to you. It is more than 140 characters.

Manny
Manny
7 years ago
Reply to  TWCB

Well apparently you don’t know either since you didn’t answer my question. I’ve known about this company since they started a few years ago and had a ridiculous idea of making people shop in shipping containers. And the business still hasn’t taken off. Which only furthers my point. What makes it so innovative? Waiting.

Prost Seattle
Prost Seattle
7 years ago

If you live in a community that doesn’t have a grocery store, and you are financially disadvantaged without the means to own a car, having a grocery store (NOT a convenience store, which just sells junk food) can mean a lot.

Wes
Wes
7 years ago

The innovation is providing a place that makes it possible to go to one of the big annoying chain grocers less often. Convenience stores do this to an extent but not like this. Using shipping containers is not that new of an idea. All it does is provide cheap space for a potential business, which is good. There have been successful and unsuccessful businesses that started in shipping containers. Some people even chose to buy them and install insulation, electricity, plumbing and hardwood floors, and call them a home. They’re a lot stronger than your typical suburban Cracker Jack box house. Apparently they’ve had some success, because they’re expanding. They’ll do we’ll at 9th and James. I use to live in the area and one of the reasons I left was because there wasn’t any small grocers I could quickly walk to. There’s also a lot hospital workers that will go there for lunch, or to pick something up before they go home.

mrs h
mrs h
7 years ago
Reply to  Wes

Aside from people who work in this ‘hood, there are many thousands of people who actually live on First Hill–by necessity and also by choice. Fresh, healthy food sounds fabulous to me!

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[…] South Park, version 1.0 — things will be a little more brick and mortar on First Hill (Image: […]

Gwen
Gwen
7 years ago

Yeah, definitely awesome to have healthy non-convenience store food available and accessible, but seems more like a wise opportunity to fill a demand than an innovation (?). Seems kind of spun like they are saving inner cities, when they are just a welcomed retailer filling a whole where there isn’t an alternative. And, not sure why “techy” because they use an iPad. My favorite food cart that does quinoa veggie bowls does that. It was curious and concerning to me that “organic” wasn’t mentioned, or the sustainable nature of packaging the food.

Not veggie bowled over.

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[…] First Hill debuted Wednesday at 9th and James. CHS profiled the business and beliefs behind the 2,000 square-foot market here earlier this […]