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The plan for the Womxn’s March on Seattle and Capitol Hill Inauguration Week protests, rallies, and parties

The Womxn’s March on Seattle will travel from the Central District’s Judkins Park to the Seattle Center on Saturday, January 21st to protest the inauguration of Donald Trump, organizers have announced. It will be part of a week of demonstrations and protests large and small, and “actions” meaningful and just for fun.

While the start and end points hadn’t been announced, Seattle’s big weekend march has been in the works for weeks and thousands have said they plan to attend in solidarity with large marches planned in Washington D.C. and in cities across the country. In Seattle, organizers say the “Womxn’s” spelling is meant “to promote intersectionality in our movement” and “takes into account the impact of discrimination based not only on gender but also race, sexual orientation, gender identity, nationality, faith, class, disability, and other backgrounds.”

Womxn’s March on Seattle

The Saturday march is being planned as a silent protest. “Marchers will rely on large numbers and powerful signage to speak more loudly than any individuals ever could,” organizers say.

Seattle women, womxn, and those who love them have been preparing with sign making and pussyhat knitting.

UPDATE 1/18/17: The city has posted route details for the week’s marches. Here are the details for Saturday:

Rally at Judkins Park followed by a march to Seattle Center beginning at 11am. From 20th Ave S and S Weller St, the route heads north on 20th Ave S, west on S Jackson St, north on 4th Ave, west on Denny Way, and north on 2nd Ave N into Seattle Center.

About 30,000 people are expected to attend, according to officials.

CHS also found many at work preparing this past weekend at a town hall organized by District 3 representative Kshama Sawant as she raises support for the planned Socialist Alternative-backed protest starting at Westlake Friday night. “We don’t have a moment to waste in getting organized against Trump’s racist, misogynistic, anti-immigrant, anti-muslim, anti-lgbtq rhetoric, proposals, and cabinet members,” Sawant’s rallying cry reads.

“Join the Resist Trump Coalition and my office at City Hall to help build the biggest possible protests against Trump on January 20th and 21st.”

This past Saturday’s town hall included a session on training — “The Basics of Organizing a Protest” — and workshops on legal rights and postering and outreach.

Meanwhile, a planned student walkout set for Friday afternoon is expected to include a rally at Seattle Central.

There will also be a few opportunities on Capitol Hill to blow off some steam. 15th Ave E’s Hopvine is holding a Beer Trumps Hate anti-inauguration party.

More inauguration and #resisttrump events from around Capitol Hill are below. Let us know what we’re missing.

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13 thoughts on “The plan for the Womxn’s March on Seattle and Capitol Hill Inauguration Week protests, rallies, and parties

  1. Do you have a street map of the women’s march on the 21st.I cannot walk very far but I do live on the top of Capitol Hill. Please reply. thanks

    • I wasn’t sure myself. I just found this on their website.

      Q: Why is “Womxn” spelled with an X?

      A: Seattle has adopted the name “Womxn’s March on Seattle” to promote intersectionality in our movement. Intersectionality acknowledges that different forms of discrimination intersect, overlap, and reinforce each other, and takes into account the impact of discrimination based not only on gender but also race, sexual orientation, gender identity, nationality, faith, class, disability, and other backgrounds.

    • This passage above didn’t clear it up for you?

      >> In Seattle, organizers say the “Womxn’s” spelling is meant “to promote intersectionality in our movement” and “takes into account the impact of discrimination based not only on gender but also race, sexual orientation, gender identity, nationality, faith, class, disability, and other backgrounds.”

  2. After months of promoting the march to announce 7 days before the event that they expect silence from all marchers is really unacceptable, especially when no other march, including DC will be silent. In The Stranger http://tinyurl.com/h8u3cuj the march organizers suggested that anyone who wants to march with their voices go march in other cities. This condescension, along with silencing voices who expressed dissent by blocking them from their Facebook event site, then deleting respectful comments seems to have alienated a lot of people. Luckily there seem to be some great options for people who want to march peacefully but not silently. Please share.

    March with Feisty Feminists
    https://www.facebook.com/events/204319230038725/
    or
    Voice Bloc
    https://www.facebook.com/events/1222195101204635/

    • The organizers have detailed the silent march aspect for much longer than seven days. Raise the issue but don’t make things up and try to spread it here.

    • Actually, the silent aspect of the march was not made public until this press release was posted on January 11. If you know of another official announcement I stand corrected. Up until then the silent aspect of the march seemed to be a discussion on Facebook on their event page but when more and more people started asking respectfully for them to consider marchers with voices, they deleted their posts, then blocked the commenters, then deleted the entire discussion. I have screen captures which were prompted by entire discussion disappearing. I know a female veteran who asked respectfully if a group could march before or after the silent marchers and many other have asked the same thing only to be told to go to march in another city. So the veteran is going to a march in Olympia. I’m marching in my city with my voice. If the goal is to attract kids, families and others to march, what’s the point of insisting on such a rigid format and not providing any other options? I am a POC and a woman who has had her voice silenced long enough. I will be silent no longer #freethemarch

  3. Sorry “FreetheMarch” I live on the Eastside (not exactly liberal land) and I heard many moons ago (like around the time the planning started- i.e. Dec ) that the Seattle March would be silent–

    And if you’d think about it for a minute or more–Silence may make this march much more impactful and unique than any other march.

  4. Non-binary gender people are called enbies, not womxn. Addressing intersectionality is important, but a clever neologism that suggests non-binary people, even feminine-presenting ones, are simply a kind of woman is cis-sexist. If this is organized by people who call themselves womxn, that’s fine, but it’s erasure to let the public assume that a binary-derived term is representative of non-binary genders.

    • by “that’s fine” I meant that only if they specifically state that and not attempt to extend the term to represent all attendees who are not “women”

  5. I’ve opened up some artwork I generated for anyone who wishes to print, spray, paste some angry but positive messaging during or around the time of the march. I only wish to help folks spread a message of peace. Tolerance should be open source.

    http://www.kreau.com

    #resisthate