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Seattle marks 150 days of protest with march from Capitol Hill

“Seattle organizers are planning a protest against police brutality as clashes with cops and rioting in Minneapolis have continued in the fiery unrest following the killing of George Floyd,” CHS reported Friday, May 29th.

That May march was organized by Central District anti-police and gun violence group Not This Time and activist Andre Taylor. But by the end of the night as thousands moved through the streets of the city and across Capitol Hill, it was clear that something larger was taking place.

150 day later, organizers of the groups that have formed and galvanized in the months since that first night of protest in Seattle gathered smaller crowds Monday night in Cal Anderson Park. Still measuring in the hundreds, the demonstrators heard organizers plead for those who showed up to mark the milestone and recommit to bolster the ongoing demonstrations and Black Lives Matter cause. Some expressed surprise at the large turnout as smaller groups have been continuing to protest, march, and sometimes take direct action with property damage and vandalism in the weeks since the larger citywide protests have ended.

A CHS timeline of the “150 days” is below.


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Dan Gregory, shot at a protest at 11th and Pine in June, returned Monday night for the 150 Days march

Monday, the crowds again took to the streets for a march from the East Precinct to the West Precinct before returning back to the core of 2020’s protests along E Pine on Capitol Hill.

The night was illustrative of how the protests have evolved in Seattle and the network of community and personal connections that keep them going as the push for defunding the Seattle Police Department and increased spending on social and community services continues. Monday night, the evolved network of Seattle protest was in motion. Social media was busy with Seattle Police scanner updates and a few livestreaming journalists who have worked to maintain a trusted place with the demonstrators even as there has been growing distrust of media and its role in recording video and images of protests activities. And a massive car brigade joined the march to provide a safety corridor around the demonstrators after a summer of threats, close-calls, and the tragic death of a protester on I-5 hit by a speeding driver.

Monday’s 150 day march was also mostly peaceful on the long route down and back up the Hill with reports of a few incidents of property damage and vandalism. The most significant police activity came later in the night as most marchers were headed home when SPD found a small group had entered an area part of its secured parking facility across the street from the East Precinct on 12th Ave. At least four people were detained. According to police radio, the alleged trespassers were to be identified and released.

The night mostly echoed with some familiar sounds from the days of CHOP. Even the protest zone “house band” was part of the effort Monday night. The Marshall Law Band which helped demonstrators rock their way through the days of activism in the CHOP zone joined Monday night’s procession performing across the city from the back of a truck.

CHS 150 Days Timeline


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Jonathan Zwickel
Jonathan Zwickel
27 days ago

SERIOUS thank you and deep respect for charting this critical movement from the beginning.