Post navigation

Prev: (01/11/21) | Next: (01/11/21)

$15 Now: Seven years later, Seattle’s smallest employers hit minimum wage milestone

Seven years later, $15 Now has raised the minimum wage across the board in Seattle

A marcher at a 2013 rally for the $15 minimum in Seattle (Images: CHS)

The seven-year plan to raise Seattle’s minimum wage to $15 has finally come to fulfillment, and local small businesses, beleaguered by the pandemic, are rising to meet the new benchmark.

Unanimously approved by the Seattle City Council in 2014, Chapter 14.19 required businesses in Seattle to incrementally raise their minimum wage each year until reaching $15 per hour over seven years. At the beginning of this year, Seattle’s minimum wage increased to $16.69 per hour for large employers with more than 500 employees. Small businesses with less than 500 employees are required to pay $15 per hour only if they pay $1.69 per hour towards medical benefits, or the employee earns $1.69 per hour in tips. If neither conditions apply, the small business is required to pay $16.69 per hour. Going forward, minimum wage increases will be in keeping with inflation. Right now, Seattle’s minimum wage is the second-highest in the U.S., just 15 cents behind Emeryville, Calif.

The $15 minimum wage was a central part of Councilmember Kshama Sawant’s campaign in 2013. At this time, Sawant has not replied to CHS’s requests to discuss the milestone.

Mark Rosén, acting president and CEO of the GSBA, pointed out that the wage increase was initially approved in a very different time. No one could have anticipated COVID-19 and the precarious position Capitol Hill retailers and restaurants would endure.


THANKS! WE DID IT! 1,000 CHS SUBSCRIBERS -- We asked, you answered. Thanks for stepping up!
Support local journalism dedicated to your neighborhood. SUBSCRIBE HERE. Join to become a subscriber at $1/$5/$10 a month to help CHS provide community news with NO PAYWALL. You can also sign up for a one-time annual payment.


Some businesses like The Wandering Goose couldn’t get the support they needed from the city and shuttered for good. Rosén said that for businesses just struggling to keep the lights on, the wage increase could force difficult decisions.

“If you’re just hanging on, it’s just another thing that might mean you can’t retain all of your employees,” Rosén said about the wage increase. “You never know when the next punch is the one that knocks you out.”

Jacque Coe of the Seattle Restaurant Alliance said Seattle bars and restaurants are struggling to survive, and it’s become increasingly more expensive to do so even before the wage increase. Adapting to COVID-19  for restaurants could mean outdoor dining construction, unemployment insurance rates, PPE purchases, remodeling of indoor spaces, and takeout packaging.

“The minimum wage increase is just one more increased expense restaurants will have to manage at a time when revenues are down, indoor dining is closed, and no date to reopen or meaningful relief is in sight,” she said. “Seattle bars and restaurants need a clear plan to reopen at a profitable level and substantive financial relief from all levels of government to restore business and bring employees back to work.”

But Capitol Hill business owners say this is a necessary step to greater equity in Seattle. Joey Burgess, owner and operator of Queer/Bar, Grims Provisions, and The Cuff, is unequivocally in favor of the march to $15.

“Every one of my team members deserves a living wage,” he said. “Low-wage jobs are disproportionately held by people of color, women and immigrants, so the wage increase in Seattle is also a win for racial, gender and social equality . . . I’d rather see our local government be creative and issue property tax credits to landlords who provided rent forgiveness, or rent reduction to retail tenants, or waive all 2021 business license fees. Any additional relief in licenses, fees, and taxes will positively impact our businesses and hopefully save hours for workers.”

Molly Moon Neitzel, founder of Molly Moon’s Homemade Ice Cream chain, is already a few steps ahead of the increase. Although Molly Moon’s discontinued tipping in 2018, mooncrew members start at $18 per hour. After six months of employment, employees are eligible for Career Pathways, an in-house training that can lead to positions at $23.50 per hour. Other benefits include a 401k program, subsidized transit passes, and paid family or medical leave. The company also provides free healthcare for employees who work 20 hours a week or more.  During COVID-19 the company suspended the hours minimum, so anyone who was already insured will keep their plan despite decreases in hours. During the pandemic, Molly Moon’s has also provided $100 gift cards to Safeway to any employee who needed them, no questions asked.

“I was a political activist before I started Molly Moon’s,” Neitzel said. “My goal was never to build a big company that profits and doesn’t take care of its people. The whole reason I started Molly Moon’s was actually to see if I could build a for-profit company that did everything that I think a company should do to take care of people. And I’m doing it, it’s possible.”

Having worked in nonprofits before launching Molly Moon’s in 2008, Neitzel worked with the Mainstreet Alliance in 2014 to advocate for the seven-year increase in minimum wage for Seattle, and again in 2016 to lobby for Initiative 1433 which increased the minimum wage of workers state-wide. Though it might be an extra burden to employers now, Neitzel affirms that putting more money in the hands of wage-earners is critical, especially as the city makes its way out of the pandemic.

“What we know about how mainstreet economies work is that when people have more money in their pockets, the first place they spend it is in restaurants and on food . . . I think our citizenry having more money in their pockets coming out of the pandemic is going to be very, very good for restaurant businesses and for small retail in general,” Neitzel said.

For struggling businesses, help is on the way in the form of a second wave of PPP loans, and the GSBA has trained staff ready to help with the process. “What GSBA does is we work with the lenders and the SBA to help people apply,” Rosén explained. “You can call some of our trainers and staff. They will help people navigate how to fill out the forms, and what forms they’re asking for . . . [the PPP loan] can make a difference for people if they want to keep their employees paid.”

Check out the GSBA’s COVID-19 Resources page for more info.


THANKS! WE DID IT! 1,000 CHS SUBSCRIBERS -- We asked, you answered. Thanks for stepping up!
Support local journalism dedicated to your neighborhood. SUBSCRIBE HERE. Join to become a subscriber at $1/$5/$10 a month to help CHS provide community news with NO PAYWALL. You can also sign up for a one-time annual payment.


Subscribe and support CHS Contributors -- $1/$5/$10 per month

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
34 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Beth
Beth
3 months ago

Great, that will help (NOT!) the already hurting small businesses!

Jon
Jon
3 months ago
Reply to  Beth

Why small business over people?

Beth
Beth
3 months ago
Reply to  Jon

Small business owners are people too. They provide the jobs for most people. If we don’t help small businesses, more people will be out of work. Forcing small businesses to pay their employees more…where does that money come from? Should they lower the benefits for their employees? Charge more for their product and bankrupt the company=no jobs for employees? Layoff some employees to cover their costs of having to pay higher wages? See, hurting small businesses hurts more people. Support small businesses and you help more people/employees. Minimum wage is not supposed to be “livable wage” it was meant to be for folks first jobs out of high school. If you want more pay….you have to have more skills/education/experience. Our states minimum wage is one of the highest in the country. It used to be “what can I do/bring to the company to help it be more successful, so that they can pay me more” now it is seems to be “the company owes me”. I would love for minimum wage to be higher, but it just doesn’t make economic sense for entry level jobs. Christopher….why are you so against business owners, who are people just like you and me, who put their heart and soul into starting a business, all the sleepless nights worrying about being able to pay their employees, often not taking a paycheck themselves, so that they can pay their employees, having the government constantly raise their taxes, and required benefits. It is such a tight balance. Can you tell I am a small business owner? I would love to pay my employees much more, but if I did, my business could not compete and I would go out of business=many jobs lost. My employees love working for my small business instead of a large corporation. I promote my employees as they gain experience=higher pay. As a country, we used to see a successful business owner and think “that’s what I want to do, how can I do that, how can I work my way up, what can I do for the company to help it be successful which will help me be more successful?!” Now it is…what can the company do for me? They owe me. They are sneaking on their phones doing who knows what when I am not around. They steal from me. And yet….I’m the bad guy, because I am a small business owner (just a person trying to make a living just like everyone else, and provide jobs for others). I hope one day, my small business will be more successful and everyone, including me can enjoy higher wages. My business is not a failure because I can not do that now. If all the small businesses went away because they can’t pay their employees as much as you think they should…there would be an unbelievable amount of unemployed workers, and so many valuable businesses, services, restaurants…gone forever. We can all just shop at big box stores and food chains. MarciaX…you say I should sell or close and try something else? You think I should start a new business that is an instant success, paying my employees high starting wages while making a profit? Please, tell me what kind of business that is and I will gladly do it. I suppose you never shop/eat/get services at small businesses. It would be sad day if they were all gone, and all of those workers out of a job. I am definitely for people…you have no idea how many people I have helped. How many have you helped?

John
John
3 months ago
Reply to  Beth

Minimum wage should most definitely be a minimum wage.

John
John
3 months ago
Reply to  Beth

Minimum wage should most definitely be a living wage.

jojo
jojo
3 months ago
Reply to  Beth

How about reading the seattle min wage study and actually see what actual researchers that are qualified to speak on this talk about instead of putting an uneducated comment here trying to disade people from actually living at 30k a year. $15 min wage is 30k a year. Only reason why people hate it is because they think itll devalue their money. It’s more of a Selfish propaganda. The study concluded that the min wage increase had no effect on grocery stores and prices. Most increased their qualify of life.

Beth
Beth
3 months ago
Reply to  jojo

Ohhhh, “actual researchers” know a whole lot more than a person actually running a business, hahahahaha!
If you have never started your own business and actually hired people, you have no idea what you are talking about. Why is everyone making the business owner the bad guy? When they are the ones CREATING the jobs for others??? No small businesses means no jobs. Forget about minimum wage. Covid, high taxes has hurt small businesses so much, and now this? Goodbye small businesses, goodbye jobs. Minimum wage is for high school students and first jobs for people, with no job experience or skills. Like I said, if you are an adult earning minimum wage…then you have not done anything to increase your education or job skills beyond a high school student.

Sara
Sara
1 month ago
Reply to  Beth

No, Beth, minimum wage was always meant to be a liveable wage. It stopped being one when Nixon was in the White House. Which is when wages technically went staginate.

Which is also around the time women started working more because their husband’s income wasn’t enough to provide for their family.

It never ceases to amaze me on how uneducated Americans really are.

Do yourself a favor and go look up the average income for a adjunct professor, which is someone with more than a high school education. According to Glassdoor, their salary is under $25k per year.

Just a little FYI for you. The disc jockeys you hear on the radio over the weekend, chances are, they’re paid min. wage. How do I know this? Because I worked in radio in the mid-1990, even went to school and got my AAS in radio broadcasting. Worked a regular shift on Sundays. My pay and the pay for every other part-time jock was min wage. I worked for them for well over a year. Improved over that year and not once was I ever given a raise.

Mike
Mike
2 months ago
Reply to  Beth

It is interesting to note that more small businesses have opened than closed since the wage increase took place.

MarciaX
MarciaX
3 months ago

$15 per hour for any kind of useful work is a pittance. If you seriously can’t pay at least that much, your business is probably a net minus for society as a whole, as you and your employees are likely receiving more in public benefits than you’re paying in taxes. Sell or close it and try something else.

Business Owner
Business Owner
3 months ago
Reply to  MarciaX

Marciax, I’m sorry, but it’s harder than you might think, and your comment is uncharitable at best. I own a restaurant/bar in Seattle that is widely considered to be one that is weathering the COVID storm really well. We are as full as we can be all the time, and my staff are paid every single dime I can figure out how to pay them. My bar manager has been paid $15 an hour for years, with a bonus tied to profits and tips, of course. After tips and bonus, he makes $70k a year, or $37 an hour, if you look at it that way. Our other bartenders just made the jump from $13.50 to $15.00 and hour, and after tips (before the wage hike) made about $32 an hour. My kitchen staff get paid $16 an hour plus a share of tips based on food sales and average around $23-24 an hour. As soon as the minimum wage hike went into effect, I got requests for raises from two employees that were making more than minimum wage. Last year, I made about $9k and averaged 70hrs a week, which puts me at about $2.50 an hour. If the wage hike were applied to last year’s numbers, I wouldn’t have made a dime, and for the record, I pulled in a whopping $40k the year before the pandemic. My husband has a great job, and is the only way we are alive still. We couldn’t legally or responsibly be much busier. Our price point isn’t cheap, and we have a pretty efficient operation. We are beloved in our neighborhood. My concern is this attitude that small business owners are all getting rich while their employees suffer. It fuels the mindset that there’s never enough for the worker, and fosters a very inhuman response to ownership. Please understand that the boss in many, if not most, small businesses, may really, actually be run by someone that is suffering greatly. They may be terrified to speak publicly about it, as I am, because this city fuels such a downright hateful view of anyone in a position of authority. Please try to see the human behind the paycheck.

cindy
cindy
2 months ago
Reply to  Business Owner

Totally understand. So many people think they know everything about owning a business even though they’ve never owned one. I owned a restaurant for 3 years and it was an eye opener for me. After working 100 hours a week for almost no money, I closed the doors…and this was before the pandemic. I can’t imagine how it would be today. I just shake my head when I hear someone criticizing restaurant owners when they have no idea what they’re talking about.

John
John
3 months ago

Does this mean no more mandatory tipping?

A.Joy
A.Joy
3 months ago
Reply to  John

Why would it? ! Only if you are a jerk. 15 an hour is still not a livable wage as long as cost of living stays so high. People depend on those tips in order to help make ends meet.

LinkRider
LinkRider
3 months ago
Reply to  John

Hopefully! Tipping is often discriminatory and associated with sexual harassment. It feels really weird not to tip, even though I know what was formerly the portion of staff earnings coming from tips has been priced into the bill, so it’s like tipping on a receipt where the tip was already automatically added. I just wish there was a way to signal to the staff that I really appreciate them that felt as uplifting. You really have to make tips against the rules to get people to stop tipping, so there’s no obvious way to thank people for their excellent service. Maybe we’ll just be saying thank you? I would also be happy to contribute to a tip pool that would raise the hourly wage for all staff, but I think it would just enable the management to have a lower base rate.

ballardite
ballardite
3 months ago

Let’s see what the cost of living index does in the next few years. We should have been under that already because I believe it is going down and it is not right to ask small businesses to pay yet another increase when COL index goes down.

Christopher
Christopher
3 months ago
Reply to  ballardite

If small businesses can’t pay employees livable wages, then your business is a failure. Why are you defending business owners over the workers? They should get more support, not a business owner.

A.Joy
A.Joy
3 months ago
Reply to  Christopher

I absolutely agree! If you own a business and worry more about your pocket then the people you use to pad that pocket you should do us all a favor and close. It’s people like this that make the cost of living continue rising while not wanting to be responsible to pay an actual living wage. You do not matter more than the people you’ve been stepping on to feel a little higher on the totem pole of life! Rights AND responsibilities!

Lori H
Lori H
2 months ago
Reply to  A.Joy

Spoken like a true millenial!

A.Joy
A.Joy
3 months ago
Reply to  ballardite

15 an hour only helps when the COL doesn’t go up. But of course it marches on even when it hits bumps, paused, or even goes down for a short time, and wages never seem to keep up always falling behind. Does 15 an hour afford a single person to rent an apartment? No. Not even full time. Not without being seriously rent burdened. What we need is for wages to go up while putting a freeze on cost of living, especially rent cost. Rent control that is coming from a place of taking care of the workers (who support the lifestyle of higher income earners) over the supposed rights of rich people’s wish to be rich. Rent control! Now! Right AND responsibilities!

RWK
RWK
3 months ago

I think it would have been helpful to small business if the latest increase in wages had been put on hold until after the pandemic is over.

A.Joy
A.Joy
3 months ago
Reply to  RWK

I know cafe vita just sold to new owner but I’m using them as an example of why I don’t agree. They were/are considered small local business. I recently saw an episode on “evening” about the (recent) owners and how they were selling their island mansion in order to move to a new one. Am I really supposed to worry that these people will maybe have to sell their mansions and won’t be able to afford thousands of square feet per person in a new home? I say move! Turn mansions and Mcmansions into truely affordable studio apartments that your low pay workers you use to pad your pockets can afford! I personally don’t think anyone needs more than 1000sf per person and that’s if you want to stay selfish and feel like you are better than your low wage workers. Stop hording more than a person needs while so many are literally desperate for even a nibble of that slice of pie! It’s glutinous and shameful. With privilege comes responsibilities!

Bill Smith
Bill Smith
1 month ago
Reply to  A.Joy

If you cant afford your rent, the simple solution is to move. It really is that easy. Plenty of choices for you to pick a place where you are successful. Stop expecting the world to revolve around you and makes poverty the norm for all.

Beth
Beth
3 months ago

Minimum wage is supposed to be entry level wages.
Look below how much higher Washington and Seattle are!
Why does that matter? Jobs will leave the city/state for other states/countries.
My little manufacturing company can not compete with Mexico or China, so I will probably have to close, and layoff all of my workers. That’s what higher minimum wage will do to businesses. We already have to pay high insurance rates, half of social security for employees, B&O taxes (for the pleasure of doing business in Washington), and many more taxes, benefits for time off…..just can’t compete. I don’t live in a mansion, in fact, I make less than my top employees right now….as do a lot of small business owners. (See my previous post) Don’t compare us to big businesses. If small businesses are not helped, they will go out of business and we will be left with jobs at Amazon and big box stores, as well as food and products from them (China). That is where we are headed. Minimum wage is not meant to be a livable wage. It is an entry level job wage. People who do not finish high school, or can not do basic math, or spell, that have no job experience, no skills yet……that is who starts out at minimum wage. If you are an older adult still making minimum wage and trying to live on it….you have not tried hard enough to better yourself to make more money. Think about the big picture. Hurting small businesses means losing more jobs and hurting more people. We can all work at and eat from Costco and Amazon and say goodbye to small and unique businesses/restaurants forever.

State 2020 Minimum Wage 2021 Minimum Wage

Alabama $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)
Alaska $10.19 $10.34
Arizona $12.00 $12.15
Arkansas $10.00 $11.00
California $13.00 $14.00*
Colorado $12.00 $12.32
Connecticut $12.00 $13.00 (effective 8/1/21)
Delaware $9.25 $10.25
Washington D.C. $15.00 $15.00
Florida $8.56 $10.00 (effective 9/30/21)
Georgia $5.15 (Employers subject to Fair Labor Standards Act must pay the $7.25 Federal minimum wage.) $5.15 (Employers subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act must pay the $7.25 Federal minimum wage)
Hawaii $10.10 $10.10
Idaho $7.25 $7.25
Illinois $10.00 $11.00
Indiana $7.25 $7.25
Iowa $7.25 $7.25
Kansas $7.25 $7.25
Kentucky $7.25 $7.25
Louisiana $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)
Maine $12.00 $12.15
Maryland $11.00 $11.75**
Massachusetts $12.75 $13.50
Michigan $9.65 $9.65
Minnesota $10.00 $10.08***
Mississippi $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)
Missouri $9.45 $10.30
Montana $8.65 $8.75
Nebraska $9.00 $9.00
Nevada $8.00 $8.75 (effective 7/1/21)****
New Hampshire $7.25) $7.25
New Jersey $11.00 $12.00*****
New Mexico $9.00 $10.50
New York $11.80 $12.50******
North Carolina $7.25 $7.25
North Dakota $7.25 $7.25
Ohio $8.70 $8.80
Oklahoma $7.25 $7.25
Oregon $12.00 $12.75 (effective 7/1/21)******
Pennsylvania $7.25 $7.25
Rhode Island $10.50 $11.50
South Carolina $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)
South Dakota $9.30 $9.45
Tennessee $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)
Texas $7.25 $7.25
Utah $7.25 $7.25
Vermont $10.96 $11.75
Virginia $7.25 $9.50 (effective 5/1/21)
Washington $13.50 $13.69
West Virginia $8.75 $8.75
Wisconsin $7.25 $7.25
Wyoming $5.15 (Employers subject to Fair Labor Standards Act must pay the Federal minimum wage.) $5.15 (Employers subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act must pay the $7.25 Federal minimum wage)

John
John
3 months ago
Reply to  Beth

Minimum wage should be a livable wage.

Lori H
Lori H
2 months ago
Reply to  John

Why? Why should a nonskilled, entry level job be a high wage job? Why shouldn’t the burden of bettering yourself fall on your shoulders? Why should someone else be responsible for the choices you made in your life?

anyways
anyways
1 month ago
Reply to  Lori H

excuse you Lori? you have no idea how privileged you sound. how can people better themselves when tuition costs are incredibly expensive, the loan interest rates are ridiculously high. Not everyone has the luxury of being able to “better themselves” you need to humble yourself. Wanting people to live a liveable wage isn’t impossible. $15 an hour is the bare minimum i.e. minimum wage it won’t affect you if you have a better paying job but i can make a huge difference in someone else’s lives. Hopefully you stop seeing the world as black and white because it is quite embarrassing for you

jojo
jojo
3 months ago
Reply to  Beth

Instead of passing off information about what happens economically when you arent qualified to give any advice regarding economics as a business owner please visit for actual studies done regarding this topic. Its so sad to see so much hate against people who are just trying to live a living wage. 15 dollars is 30k a year! https://depts.washington.edu/urbanuw/news/what-happened-when-these-places-raised-the-minimum-wage-to-15/

A.Joy
A.Joy
3 months ago
Reply to  Beth

There are many walks in life that lead down different pathways. There are also many obstacles to stop a person from accessing some of the paths that would make the journey earlier to navigate. Once upon a time minimum wage was a stepping stone to other paths but that just isn’t reality anymore. Even if everyone was lucky enough to not have life circumstances keep them off entitled paths and made it through college to as you say better themselves, there wouldn’t be enough high wage jobs for all. Unfortunately a system has been built for too long now that relies on low paid workers but doesn’t value them. Poor people are kept poor so the middle class can feel superior and spend all time focusing on how the poor are coming for them and not look at the people who are really making a mess of all aka the very wealthy. Razzle dazzle! Keep the workers fighting so they don’t notice when the rich secret away resources and pull up the ladder behind them. I think truely small business just starting out should be getting all the help they can get, but what is allowed to be called a small business need to be reexamined. Again cafe vita was/ is considered small business while (previous) owners are selling an island mansion so that they can move to a new mansion. You don’t live in one, I get it, but it sounds like you still feel like you should as a business owner have the chance to do so. I disagree. We all should have a right to a decent and safe place but to what end? Does a giant home make you a better person? No. Does paying too much for a brand name make you a better person? No. I guess when you are a startup and your highest paid workers are making more than you I will agree this makes you a better person. If your business succeeds while treating employees fairly then congratulations! You are a success! And eventually you will have the choice to buy into McMansion life if you so choose (I hope you don’t) you too can become a resource hoarder! (I hope you don’t)
In the meantime good luck to your business, but remember min wage jobs are keeping people from becoming homeless, are feeding babies, are paying for much needed medicine, are keeping senior citizens from going under etc… A business owners supposed right to profit should not ever outweigh a very real need to support oneself.

Beth
Beth
3 months ago
Reply to  A.Joy

Thank you for your considerate reply. There are folks on both sides, and it just drives me crazy when people assume things about small business owners. Some small business owners are good, some are bad. Some employees are good, some are bad. It’s like that everywhere. I grew up extremely poor and I started working when I was 14. I worked full time during all school breaks. I worked two full time jobs after I graduated. I could not afford college. I gained work skills, I worked my way up. I started my own business. I give so much to my employees, things that I always wished my previous employers would have done for me…flex time to help with childcare, opportunity to work your way up as I did, loaned money, my car, on and on. I am a very giving person, I love my employees. I start them out at minimum wage with the opportunity to prove themselves, learn skills and move up and make more money. I have the state and federal government and insurance companies constantly increasing taxes and fees that I have to pay. Covid hurts. The economy hurts. I eat that loss, as I keep paying my employees more. I pay them first before I pay myself. (Sometimes I don’t take a paycheck). I love what I do and how I help people. So, I just don’t understand why so many people think I’m the bad guy. Honestly, if I pay everyone more, I just could not stay in business, period. I would love to pay everyone more, but I just can not, especially right now. Everyone thinks a business owner is bad and rich and selfish….that is so not me, and my other business owner friends.

The Ghostt Of Capitol Hill
The Ghostt Of Capitol Hill
3 months ago

$15 an hour helped me out a lot after it passed. It’s a blessing for so many who live here!

Living Wage Warrior
Living Wage Warrior
2 months ago

Consider yourself lucky! It’s $7.25 in my city with no way to increase it. Everyone’s broke.

Mitch Smith
Mitch Smith
2 months ago

From the story, an interview with Joey Burgess, owner and operator of Queer/Bar, Grims Provisions, and The Cuff. Mr. Burgess “…is unequivocally in favor of the march to $15. I’d rather see our local government be creative and issue property tax credits to landlords who provided rent forgiveness, or rent reduction to retail tenants, or waive all 2021 business license fees. Any additional relief in licenses, fees, and taxes will positively impact our businesses and hopefully save hours for workers.”.

So Mr. Burgess wants others to pay, but when it’s his turn to pay not so fast. Hypocrisy much?

Living Wage Warrior
Living Wage Warrior
2 months ago

The minimum wage should be like $20 nationwide and $30 in Seattle. The tears of the Chamber of Commerce would be worth it.