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They won landmarks protections — Now residents of Capitol Hill’s La Quinta apartments want chance to buy the building

(Image: Viva La Quinta/Jesse L. Young)

With an early start, the residents and neighbors of Capitol Hill’s Frederick Anhalt-designed La Quinta apartments have already worked together to win landmarks protections for the 1927-built complex at 17th and Denny.

Now they are in a rush to try to rally together to buy the landmarked building before a sale closes that will move the property into new hands after the death of longtime owner Ken Van Dyke in early 2020.

Residents have started a petition calling on the ownership company set up for the building to hold off on a planned sale and give the neighbors a chance to match the price:

Less than two weeks ago, we discovered that our home was being put on the market. As tenants, we are willing and able to purchase La Quinta collectively, as a cooperative. However, our landlord has refused us the opportunity to purchase, preferring to sell to a buyer who can purchase in cash.

(Image: Viva La Quinta/Jesse L. Young)

We’ve started a petition to help advocate for our chance to match the highest bidder and buy our home! We are on a tight deadline: the sale is expected to close tomorrow, Wednesday, and we are asking for an extension on that deadline with the help of everyone’s signatures:

Help Us Buy Our Home, La Quinta, and Preserve Affordable Housing on Capitol Hill

“Many of us organized more recently to get La Quinta recognition as a historic landmark, and were successful,” the petition reads. “No matter what happens, the exterior of the building will remain preserved for future tenants or homeowners, however the interior may not be so lucky. Additionally, if purchased by the current buyer, it will likely become unaffordable to live in this place that we have worked hard to preserve.”

CHS is reaching out to the Van Dyke family to ask more about the extension request and planned sale.

 

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Nope
Nope
3 months ago

I hate to say it, but it really isn’t that interesting of a building from an aesthetic perspective. It also looks like someone needs to do a lot of maintenance. One of the joys of owning a building I guess…

Frank
Frank
3 months ago
Reply to  Nope

It’s just an old building. If this was proposed today, neighbors would complain about it being too boxy, not having enough color, the lack of parking in the area.

Good luck to the tenants, but there’s nothing worth of landmark designation.

Salamanturd
Salamanturd
3 months ago
Reply to  Nope

Around here, now, it’s a very interesting building, and becoming more so by the year. It’s always had a rough-around-the-edges charm. I don’t equate that with looking like it needs a lot of maintenance.

Phil Mocek
3 months ago

Good luck, everybody!