One person critically injured in 21st and Denny apartment building fire

At least one person was reported injured in a fire in an apartment building at 21st and E Denny Wednesday night.

Seattle Fire was called to the scene at 2112 E Denny Way just after 7 PM to reports of smoke coming from the building. The address is the location of the Avant Apartments, a six-story building that opened to residents in 2019.

Seattle Fire said its firefighters were responding to the blaze. According to SFD radio updates, one injured person was removed from the fire scene. Seattle Fire says its crews rescued an adult male in critical condition and paramedics were attempting lifesaving efforts.No additional occupants were found inside.

Streets in the area were closed to traffic during the response.


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Capitol Hill church fundraising to repair historic windows damaged during protests

Central Lutheran Church sits at the corner of 11th and E Olive and holds its place in the middle of the communities around Cal Anderson Park including hosting religious services and providing space to feed the hungry in partnership with the Capitol Hill Community Lunch nonprofit.

The old church has also found itself in the middle of the protests that have continued in the area around the park and the East Precinct and, like many buildings near Cal Anderson, has suffered property damage during the unrest.

Some blows have hurt more than others. In August and again in September, Central Lutheran’s historic stained-glass windows were damaged. It is now hoping to raise $60,000 to repair the broken glass.

“Please help us restore our windows to their former appearance so that we can continue our service to the Capitol Hill community and greater Seattle for another 117 years,” the church’s Central Council writes.

You can learn more and give here.

‘It’s urgent’ — Mayor says launching initiatives to open Cal Anderson, remove East Precinct wall amid encampments and ongoing protests

Video images from Matthew Brian posted by @spekulation

Mayor Jenny Durkan tells CHS that her office will “in coming weeks” launch two initiatives planned with local businesses and community representatives to “restore” Cal Anderson Park and take down the barricades around the East Precinct.

“It’s urgent,” the mayor said Tuesday. “It is our densest neighborhood with a very high ratio of people who are renters. There’s very little open space.” The mayor said business and property is also at the front of the discussion after months of demonstrations and ongoing police and protester clashes around the precinct, the park, and the Capitol Hill core.

Beyond reopening a park and clearing the sidewalk at 12th and Pine, the initiatives would be most important for their implications for the neighborhood’s homelessness crisis and the ongoing, nightly protest and unrest. Continue reading

State Supreme Court will consider appeal in Sawant recall case in January

(Image: @try_thinking0 via Twitter)

December will bring new developments in Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant’s appeal of the recall case against her to the State Supreme Court.

Sawant’s legal team launched the appeal in October following a King County Superior Court judge’s decision that allowed the recall effort against the District 3 representative and longest serving member of the council to move forward.

The Supreme Court is scheduled to take up and decide on the appeal January 7th in a session in which legal briefs from Sawant’s team and lawyers for the Recall Sawant campaign will be considered but there will be no oral arguments. Continue reading

Seattle U’s Jim and Janet Sinegal Center for Science and Innovation on track to open for 2021 school year

Seattle University said its new five-story, 111,000-square-foot science and tech building designed as the school’s new main entrance on 12th Ave will be completed in May and ready for next year’s fall quarter as it announced the building will be named to honor two longtime benefactors.

The Jim and Janet Sinegal Center for Science and Innovation will serve the university’s growing science, technology, engineering and mathematics student population as well as make a new home for campus radio station KXSU. The new building will also house the university’s Center for Community Engagement, which runs the Seattle University Youth Initiative.

The University Services building, a former Canada Dry bottling facility, was demolished to make way for the project.

The school says the Sinegals have been a longtime part of the campus community: Continue reading

Below The Reef, La Rue Creperie and Espresso adds a new Capitol Hill counter on E Olive Way

La Rue’s Basic Bitch features organic pumpkin butter with a spiced cookie crumble (Image: La Rue)

The challenging times of COVID-19 bring the occasional small joys including new reasons to celebrate Capitol Hill’s great walk-ups. The newest addition to the Hill’s counter scene is on E Olive Way beneath The Reef pot shop where La Rue Creperie and Espresso is now serving the neighborhood every Wednesday through Sunday.

“I was working my way just to be a sous chef,” owner Alex Villa tells CHS, “but this opportunity kind of leveled me up.”

Villa says he came up with the idea for La Rue after learning about The Reef’s search for a chef to put its lower level space along E Olive Way into motion with a new concept. Taylor Cheney, who opened E Olive Way walk-up spot Yalla last year hooked Villa up with Reef owner Adam Simon who liked his pitch and was open to taking a chance on the first-time business owner inspired by his work and knowledge gained during travel in Europe. Villa says the fact that he lives next door probably also helped sell Simon on the idea. Continue reading

Oh Hello Again is a new Capitol Hill book shop organized in a bibliotherapeutic notion

(Image: Oh Hello Again)

In the wake of another “record breaking” Cyber Monday for Seattle retailing giant Amazon, a new bookstore with a twist in how it organizes its shelves and helps its customers find new and useful things to read is preparing to open on Capitol Hill.

“You can find the topic you’re interested in. Or a book maybe you weren’t even looking for,” owner Kari Ferguson tells CHS about Oh Hello Again, her new “bibliotherapy” bookstore opening this week on 15th Ave E.

Bibliotherapy? Ferguson describes it as “the notion that novels and reading can help individuals process, work through, and deal with different issues and concerns in their lives.”

The approach means Oh Hello Again is organized by topics — “mental health, everyday problems, bettering yourself, relationships, travel, and many more” — but don’t expect shelves of self-help books. The sections contain a mix of novels, picture books, young adult books, and graphic novels that address the themes of the areas a reader might want to explore. Continue reading

Four arrests after broken glass and graffiti as black bloc marchers mark ‘May 30th’ protest

Dozens of “direct action” protesters marched across Capitol Hill Monday night marking six months since the May 30th clash between demonstrators and police that brought fire, tear gas, and gunfire to Seattle’s core and sparked continuing unrest following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Police reported four people were arrested Monday night out of the group of around 100 for “property damage” and “obstructing a law enforcement officer.”

The “black bloc” marchers spray painted buildings, damaged banks, and reportedly used a baton to smash windows at a business. Images posted by SPD showed a damaged and tagged ATM, and shattered glass at the Broadway Starbucks. Later in the night following the arrests, police reported more attempts to break glass using bricks and an illegal fire at 11th and Denny. Continue reading

Capitol Hill Community Post | BIPOC-owned small businesses in Seattle may now apply for support from Comcast Rise — SPONSORED

By Comcast Washington — Sponsored

U.S. small businesses have been particularly hard hit by the pandemic. A recent study from the National Bureau of Economic Research found that the number of U.S. active business owners dropped from 15 million to 11.7 million from February to April. The study cited that Black-owned small businesses were hardest hit, suffering the steepest decline (41 percent), followed by Hispanic and Asian American-owned small businesses.

In response, Comcast Corporation launched the Comcast RISE program to help strengthen and empower these Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC)-owned small businesses hard hit by COVID-19. Comcast RISE will help thousands of small businesses over the next three years by offering grants, marketing and technology upgrades, including media campaigns and connectivity, computer and voice equipment, as well as free marketing insights to all applicants. Continue reading

CHS Pics | The corner of 34th Ave E and Douglas Q. Barnett Street

E Union at 34th Ave E has a new honorary street name. Now, to find the former home of Seattle’s Black Arts/West Theatre, just look for Douglas Q. Barnett Street.

The new designation was celebrated last week before the Thanksgiving holiday with a ceremony at the corner where Barnett founded and led the theater from 1969 until it lost funding and was closed in 1980. Barnett passed away last year at the age of 88.

“I had none,” said Tee Dennard tells CHS of his acting experience before finding Black Arts/West Theatre. “I came out here on a bet — on an audition. And I got the part.” Denard eventually became artistic director and has enjoyed a lifetime as a working actor. Continue reading