Angels in Seattle, updated with I-90 bridge closure schedule


See also the DOT Bridge closure schedule:

Which roads and ramps will be closed?

Interstate 90 will be closed to all vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists, eastbound and westbound, mainline and express lanes, between Interstate 5 in Seattle to Island Crest Way on Mercer Island:

  • Thursday, Aug. 2:  9:45 a.m. – noon & 1:15 – 2:30 p.m., (Practice)
  • Friday, Aug. 3:  12:45 p.m. – 2:40 p.m., (Practice)
  • Saturday, Aug. 4:  12:45 p.m. – 2:40 p.m., (Full show)
  • Sunday, Aug. 5:  12:45 p.m. – 2:40 p.m., (Full show)

* The bridge highrises will still be accessible to pedestrians and cyclists. However, no one on foot or bike can travel beyond the highrises up to 30 minutes prior to posted closure times.

 

 

 

 

Obama visit traffic advice

TRAFFIC

The trip is expected to significantly disrupt traffic because Obama is scheduled to arrive during the evening rush hour.

The presidential motorcade is expected to drive north through Seattle from Boeing Field on I-5, then to SR 520. Drivers should anticipate a rolling closure on I-5 as the president passes, then the 520 floating bridge will be shut down to allow Obama’s cars to drive across. The motorcade should exit at 84th Avenue Northeast and continue to Hunts Point.

Overall, avoid I-5 and 520 between 5:30 and 6:30 p.m. To avoid the worst backups, try to leave Seattle before 5:00 p.m.  (from KING 5)

Help protect our play fields

Please call 911 if you see anyone letting off fireworks on Miller or Bobby Morris play fields: the plastic playing surface is easily destroyed by fireworks.

NEWS RELEASE

Mike McGinn, Mayor                         

Christopher M. Williams, Acting Superintenden

For immediate release                                                                      July 2, 2012               

Contact:          Karen O’Connor, 206-684-8020

                        e-mail: karen.o’connor@seattle.gov

LIGHTS WILL BE TURNED ON AT SYNTHETIC FIELDS JULY 4

 Seattle Parks and Recreation will activate the field lighting on synthetic ballfields throughout the city on the evening of Wednesday, July 4, to protect the synthetic surfaces. The ballfield lights will be turned on at approximately 8:45 p.m. and will be turned off at either 10 p.m. or 11 p.m., depending on the field. 

The lights will be turned on to discourage the use of fireworks.  Fireworks are illegal in the City of Seattle and will destroy the artificial turf on the fields.  The approximate replacement cost for synthetic carpet based on per average full size field (110,000 square feet) is $1.2 million. All the fields have been renovated over the past five years and benefit field users including soccer, football, baseball, Ultimate Frisbee and lacrosse.     

 Seattle Parks and Recreation appreciates all the community involvement in the field restorations and reminds the community to be good stewards of the synthetic fields. 

 The lights will be turned on at 8:45 p.m. at the following fields, and turned off at the time noted:

(relevant ones from their list)

  • Bobby Morris at Cal Anderson Park off at 11 p.m.

1635 11th Ave

  • ………
  • Miller Playfield off at 10 p.m.

330 19th Ave. E

……….

 

  • For additional questions or information please contact Seattle Parks and Recreation security officer Lisa Harrison at 206-423-0526.

 

# # #

Karen O’Connor

Communications Strategic Advisor

Seattle Parks and Recreation

100 Dexter Ave. N, Seattle 98109

206.684.8020 (o)

206.909.6849 (c)

Library Bond vote on August Primary: Pro and Con

(East District Council member, and First Hill representative, Jim Erickson has kindly allowed me to circulate these notes he circulated after the Library Bond presentation at the last East District Council meeting)

Recently, at the East District Council Meeting, I listened to Peter Steinbrueck and Chris Leman debate the issue of Seattle Proposition 1. In an era of reduced revenue, it has been necessary to cut library services. The Seattle Primary Election Ballot asks the voter to approve or disapprove Seattle Proposition 1 which would increase property taxes by about $52 per year for seven years starting in 2013. This library levy will deposit $17.3 million annually in The Library Fund that will address keeping libraries open for more hours, continuing to acquire books and materials, improving computer and online services and maintaining buildings. Oversight will be provided by a five-member citizen panel. Each year the Library must submit a plan to the Mayor and the Council.

I have attached copies of two double faced documents that were provided by Chris and Peter.

Chris Leman argued that the library has traditionally been part of the Mayor’s budget submittal and removing the Library from the general budget will create a short sighted precedent. When this proposed tariff ends in 2019 there will be no space in the general budget and the voters will be forced to renew the tariff. The Library Levy supplements the General Fund for this important public service using a separate tax base for seven years, but as Chris points out – there is no coming back.

Peter Steinbrueck argued that under the restraint of the recession, combined with the Eyman tax cut initiatives, the libraries have already experienced severe cuts in services and without the approval of Seattle Proposition 1, further cuts will cause painful reductions in service.

Please encourage your friends and neighbors to prepare to vote on Proposition 1.

Voter’s Guide:      http://www2.seattle.gov/ethics/votersguide.asp?e=20120807&p=02_01

Chris Leman:     cleman@oo.net

Peter Steinbrueck:     petersteinbrueck@comcast.net

Post Script – The subject of the Library Levy was squeezed into a busy agenda and it really deserved more attention. I thank Chris Leman and Peter Steinbrueck for volunteering to take sides in a discussion that ended too soon. In the room, a few comments centered on how the boxes called Library are timely and relevant in our individual lives. I talked about a Bookmobile that my neighbors enjoy. Kristin O’Donnell said that it is all right if the Library is a comfortable place for street people to rest, as long as they behave. A young man asked – In this digital age when bookstores are closing and books can be transmitted over the internet, do these library plans consider the advantages of technical innovations?

In reflection, I think it is not about what goes on in the box, but, instead it is about who pays the bill. In effect, Chris argues that our elected leaders are responsible to make choices on how we should learn to live within our means. While Peter argues that if Property Owners foot the bill, we can have more generous library privileges. The Library Levy permanently shifts this important public service to a separate source of revenue and as Chris points out – there is no coming back.

(and later)

When Chris Leman and Peter Steinbrueck recently discussed the Library Levy in the East District Council meeting, several people raised questions about the future of Seattle Libraries. In my outmoded thinking I had a mental picture of my early years when I learned to use the Dewey Decimal System and manually fingered through drawers of index cards. Kristin O’Donnell referred to a social space where people could come in and get out of the rain. And a young man asked if the seven year budget forecasts considered the digital revolution where book stores are closing and the printed word does not need paper.

Thanks to Chris Givens, I want to share with you the first nine minutes of a TED video, that describes how coming in out of the rain; book stacks arranged in Dewey order; and the digital revolution were all factors in the design of Seattle’s world famous Central Library.

“Architect Joshua Prince-Ramus takes the audience on dazzling, dizzying virtual tours of three recent projects: the Central Library in Seattle, the Museum Plaza in Louisville and the Charles Wyly Theater in Dallas.”

http://www.ted.com/talks/joshua_prince_ramus_on_seattle_s_library.html

Please encourage your friends and neighbors to prepare to vote on Proposition 1.

Voter’s Guide:      http://www2.seattle.gov/ethics/votersguide.asp?e=20120807&p=02_01

Jim Erickson

Miller’s Little Learners Preschool

Capitol Hill’s Miller Community Center (330 -19th Ave. E.) is starting a preschool this Fall, and invites you all to come and check it out. Center Director Lori Van Norman  (206-684-4753) will be happy to tell you more.

Miller’s Little Learners

Ages: 3 – 5

This class is a great way to prepare your child for kindergarten while having fun with friends in a safe and nurturing environment. Children will explore their ABCs, 123s, music, art, singing, story time, and physical activities. No class 11/12 and 11/23.

9/10-10/5 M/W/F 9:30 am-12:30 pm $216

10/8-11/2 M/W/F 9:30 am-12:30 pm $216

11/5-12/5 M/W/F 9:30 am-12:30 pm $216

Location: Miller Community Center

Call for more information or to register: 206-684-4753

Quickstart Tennis for kids 7 to 10 at Miller Community Center

A new program at Miller Community Center (330 – 19th Ave. E; 206-684-4753), as described by Center Director Lori Van Norman:

For parents looking for a fun, but inexpensive summer activity for their children, QuickStart Tennis is the program for you. The QuickStart Tennis League is designed as a FUN play-based approach to tennis for kids 7-10 years old. The program uses age-appropriate courts and equipment in order to guarantee that all children have a successful experience.  Kids will be active and learn important skills, while having fun. Practices are held on Tuesday at Miller Community Center from 6-7 p.m. for children 7-8 years old and 7-8 p.m. for children 9-10 years old. Children will participant in league play on Thursday between 6-8 p.m. The program runs from June 26 to August 18. Cost is $35.

You can learn more about the program by calling the Center at (206) 684-4753, E-mailng Lori (Lori.VanNorman@seattle.gov) or by visiting this website.

New Parks or Green Spaces for Capitol Hill?

(Yes, there are multiple parks projects in the works for our area. However as Capitol Hill, already the densest neighborhood in the NW, continues to get denser, it would be wise to capture all the Green Spaces we can)

For immediate release                                                                                  May 18, 2012

Contact:          Karen O’Connor, 206-684-8020

                        Email: karen.o’connor@seattle.gov

 2012/2013 Parks and Green Spaces Levy Opportunity Fund

Proposal letter is simple first step to apply for funding

 The 2008 Parks and Green Spaces Levy allocates $15 million in funding for community initiated park development or property acquisition projects. Seattle Parks and Recreation is looking forward to receiving Proposal Letters, due by 4 p.m. on Monday, June 11, 2012. The Proposal Letters are the first step of the Opportunity Fund process for projects; the official application packet is due in September.

 

Parks hosted three technical assistance workshops over the last month to announce the 2012/2013 cycle of the Parks and Green Spaces Levy Opportunity Fund. In the first round, $7 million was allocated to projects throughout Seattle. Rainier Beach Urban Farm, Bitter Lake Park Enhancement, Lewis Park Reforestation and an acquisition of a site at 19th and Madison are among the fifteen projects that received funding in the first round. There is up to $8 million for distribution in this second round.

 If you were unable to attend the meetings and would like assistance in submitting a Proposal Letter, please contact one of the project planners listed below.

 Seattle voters passed the Parks and Green Spaces Levy by a 59% vote in November 2008. The $146 million Levy provides acquisition funding for new neighborhood parks and green spaces and development funding for projects such as improved playfields, reservoir lid parks, renovated playgrounds, community gardens, and safety upgrades at city owned cultural facilities.

 For additional information about the process, please visit the Opportunity Fund website at http://www.seattle.gov/parks/levy/opportunity.htm or contact Seattle Parks and Recreation Planners: Susanne Rockwell at 206-684-0902 or susanne.rockwell@seattle.gov, or Emily Lofstedt at 206-684-7047 or emily.lofstedt@seattle.gov

More Parks /Green Spaces for Capitol Hill?

(Yes, there are new parks in the works, but our area is the most dense in the NW, and getting denser, so we should capture as much open space as we can)

2012/2013 Parks and Green Spaces Levy Opportunity Fund 

For immediate release                                                                                  May 18, 2012

Contact:          Karen O’Connor, 206-684-8020

                        Email: karen.o’connor@seattle.gov

Proposal letter is simple first step to apply for funding

 The 2008 Parks and Green Spaces Levy allocates $15 million in funding for community initiated park development or property acquisition projects. Seattle Parks and Recreation is looking forward to receiving Proposal Letters, due by 4 p.m. on Monday, June 11, 2012. The Proposal Letters are the first step of the Opportunity Fund process for projects; the official application packet is due in September.

 

Parks hosted three technical assistance workshops over the last month to announce the 2012/2013 cycle of the Parks and Green Spaces Levy Opportunity Fund. In the first round, $7 million was allocated to projects throughout Seattle. Rainier Beach Urban Farm, Bitter Lake Park Enhancement, Lewis Park Reforestation and an acquisition of a site at 19th and Madison are among the fifteen projects that received funding in the first round. There is up to $8 million for distribution in this second round.

 If you were unable to attend the meetings and would like assistance in submitting a Proposal Letter, please contact one of the project planners listed below.

 Seattle voters passed the Parks and Green Spaces Levy by a 59% vote in November 2008. The $146 million Levy provides acquisition funding for new neighborhood parks and green spaces and development funding for projects such as improved playfields, reservoir lid parks, renovated playgrounds, community gardens, and safety upgrades at city owned cultural facilities.

 For additional information about the process, please visit the Opportunity Fund website at http://www.seattle.gov/parks/levy/opportunity.htm or contact Seattle Parks and Recreation Planners: Susanne Rockwell at 206-684-0902 or susanne.rockwell@seattle.gov, or Emily Lofstedt at 206-684-7047 or emily.lofstedt@seattle.gov

East District Council Meeting — Plus, more Capitol Hill community meetings

The dull but essential East District Council meets again, in the Capitol Hill Library at 6PM on Monday May 14th.

We will:

  • hear about (and ask questions about) the upcoming streetcar construction
  • accept nominations for East District Council officers: no reason why you should not be a candidate.
  • wish our District Coordinator Tim Durkan well as he heads off to Africa
  • welcome our interim Coordinator, Karen Ko, who will presumably still be covering the North Region of the City while she covers for the absent Tim.  

(The City is continually cutting back on support for District Councils. I doubt if this will make life any easier for Karen or us  )

    See DRAFT minutes of April meeting (attached)