You’ve got Seattle Democracy Vouchers, here’s how to use them

$2? Thanks for nothing

Seattle’s effort to change the game around campaign financing has already become an issue in the 2019 race for District 3 as who will — and who won’t — be participating in the progressive program has become a dividing issue in the earliest days of the race. Seattle’s Democracy Vouchers for the 2019 election have already been sent out and you may have been looking at the unopened envelope wondering what to do next.

  1. First, don’t lose them. Registered Seattle voters can use the four $25 a piece vouchers through the end of November.
  2. You’ll need to make a choice. But it doesn’t necessarily need to be about District 3. “Your 2019 Democracy Vouchers can be given to any participating City Council candidate, including candidates within or outside your council district,” the city writes. You can give all four of your vouchers to one candidate or you can engage in a little democratic roulette and spread the love around your favorite deserving candidates for city council who are participating in the program. The list of eligible 2019 recipients to-date is here. The mayoral race will not be eligible for the program until 2021 as the voucher fundraising limits are higher and the program needs more time to accumulate funds.
  3. Please print clearly. You can cash in your Democracy Vouchers directly to a candidate’s campaign, to the Seattle Ethics and Elections Commission, or by dropping them off at one of the designated locations. Vouchers must have your signature and the candidate’s name clearly written to be processed. Drop off locations and email addresses for the program can be found here.
  4. Or wait until the online portal is launched on February 28th. You can also make your Democracy Voucher online starting at the end of the month if everything goes as planned. Tune in here for details.

Registered voters in Seattle should automatically receive the $100 in vouchers in the mail. Seattle residents who are at least 18 and are either a U.S. citizen, U.S. national or a lawful permanent resident can apply for vouchers here. You can request replacement vouchers here.

More information is available at seattle.gov/democracyvoucher.

Capitol Hill Community Post | Run- DO NOT WALK to Save Small Business

Washington State legislature aims to dramatically impact your business, income or access to affordable services

From D’Arcy Harrison Co-Owner of Emerson Salon

Apparently, state politicians feel small businesses need to add to their already high costs while simultaneously heaping on new restrictions that severely limit their business freedoms. If you are a big company, corporation, organization or union you hire a a lobbyist to speak on your behalf to help protect your legal interests…. Continue reading

Capitol Hill Community Post | Seattle Central hosts Day of Remembrance for interned Japanese American students

From Seattle Central College
Seattle Central College will host a day of remembrance on Feb. 19, 2019 for the students whose lives and careers were derailed by the forced internment of Japanese Americans in 1942.

Starting at 10 a.m. Seattle Central will show the documentary “And Then They Came For Us” in the Broadway Performance Hall, followed by a discussion.

Beginning at noon, the campus will hold a candlelight remembrance at the campus’s historic Tsutakawa Fountain. Students in Japanese language classes will read the names of over 150 students of Japanese descent who were forced to leave Broadway High School, the school that later became Seattle Central College. Continue reading

CHS Pics | An erotic Capitol Hill Art Walk (MSFW)

Contemplating the love of art and the art of love at Love City Love

Love and sex was in the air Thursday night as February’s Capitol Hill Art Walk got all mixed up and sloppy with Valentine’s Day. CHS stopped through Ghost Gallery’s The Art of Tarot III exhibition, Blue Cone Studio’s Erotica Art Walk and Love City Love’s Tongue Jockey Heart Breakers group show and found plenty of penises, vulvas, and boobs. And, hearts, too. Maybe safe for work? Mostly safe for work? Or just wait until you get home. Love, CHS.

Continue reading

CHS Pics | No New Youth Jail Valentines at 12th and Alder

Activists may have lost in court but they haven’t given up on winning hearts in their battle against the new youth jail at 12th and Alder.

Saying she and fellow activists were there to celebrate Valentine’s Day and “what it means to love community and love young people,” activist and attorney Nikkita Oliver said a group gathered outside the under construction King County Youth and Family Justice Center would be delivering No New Youth Jail Valentines to officials and judges.

“We are here to uplift ourselves and love ourselves and say we’re not going to allow buildings like this to be built and invested in,” Oliver said. Continue reading

Should the state spend $20M more to save the Montlake Market?

Some Montlake neighbors are calling on the Washington State Department of Transportation to add some 45 days and $20 million of construction to a key SR-520 project in order to save the neighborhood’s grocery and quick stop market.

Thursday is the final day of an online survey process WSDOT is using to gauge public interest in three main possible scenarios — preserve the Montlake Market but close it during construction, preserve the market and allow the store to continue operating through construction, or tear it all down. You can take the WSDOT survey here through 5 PM Thursday. Continue reading

SNOWBRUARY 2019 — Wednesday update: Snow routes, schools closed (parents sad), levies renewed (kids happy)

Banks of dirty, wet snow line the edges of Capitol HIll’s streets while sidewalks remain a slushy mess. Cars probably won’t be spinning out once they make it to the street but the new spectator sport is watching people try to dig their cars out. Maybe lend a hand. Here are some wrap-up notes on Snowbruary 2019’s Wednesday.

  • Snow routes: Metro will restore most of its service and buses will operate on snow routes Wednesday morning “on a route-by-route basis,” the county says:
    Riders are encouraged to visit Metro’s MetroWinter.com website for route specific information on Wednesday morning before traveling and sign up for alerts. Online updates are underway for over 200 bus routes and will be available by Wednesday morning.

  • No school: If the parents, grandparents, guardians, and child care pros in your life seem a little rundown, consider that Wednesday is yet another snow day. While the main streets are mostly clear, the soppy conditions moved Seattle Public Schools to declare yet another snow day:
    Schools will be closed on Wednesday, Feb. 13 due to adverse weather conditions. We thank the City of Seattle for their continued and diligent efforts to clear roads including many near our schools. Yet, many sidewalks and walkways are not cleared of ice and slush, and side streets in the north and south ends of the district continue to be icy. All activities, athletics and public meetings are canceled. There will be no preschool or Head Start.
    As for make-up days, the district reminds there are two scheduled — June 21 and 24 — but says the state won’t consider any waiver requests “until after the threat of further weather closures has passed.” UPDATE: Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan said Wednesday the city has been working with Seattle Public School and King County Metro “to discuss immediate next steps to try and get our children back into schools as quickly as possible.” Seattle Schools has workers out clearing sidewalks near its campuses and SDOT road crews are out again pre-treating roads in anticipation of another freeze Wednesday night. As for garbage, crews are out for Monday/Tuesday customers Wednesday with other customers on a one-day delay.
  • Levies: The district is declaring victory in Tuesday’s vote on two school levies. “These two levy replacements will help fund critical day-to-day operations for Seattle Public Schools, including salaries, textbooks and materials, as well as the rebuild of eight aging schools, improved safety and security, increased technology access, and added capacity across our district,” a statement on the successful votes reads.

 

Capitol Hill Community Post | Ami Nguyen Announces Candidacy for Seattle City Council in District 3

From Friends of Ami Nguyen

Public defender and former tenants’ rights lawyer Ami Nguyen is running for the Seattle City Council in District 3, which includes the Central District, Capitol Hill, Yesler Terrace, Mt Baker, Madrona, Leschi, Madison Park and Montlake.

Nguyen is entering the race to bring a strong and nuanced approach to policy change in Seattle focusing on municipal justice reform, homelessness prevention, and childcare access. “I want to see more direct policy changes to reflect the values we stand for as a city” says Nguyen.

“As a public defender who has worked with the most vulnerable populations at Seattle Municipal Court, I look forward to pressing for policy changes that eradicates discrimination and unfair treatment of people of color, poor people, and individuals suffering from mental illness or addiction. I will put forth policies where social services replace ineffective punitive systems that excessively drain our budget.”

“My experience as a renter and tenants’ rights attorney has given me the insight to develop policies that empowers renters so that the system is no longer a tool only for the rich.” Says Nguyen, “The City has the duty to enforce habitability laws and fine slumlords without displacing tenants.”

Ami recognizes the high cost of childcare, forcing long-term Seattle residents to move to other cities. “Childcare costs should not prohibit families from staying in Seattle. Our city needs to provide resources to make obtaining child care licensing more feasible and subsidize child care businesses.” She plans to participate in Seattle’s Democracy Voucher Program.