This week in CHS history | COVID-19: Restrictions extended, grocery store changes, 2018: 30 years of Vivace, 2011: Block Party adds third day


Here are the top stories from this week in CHS history:

2020

 

Washington extends COVID-19 restrictions another month

More COVID-19 tweaks to Capitol Hill grocery shopping: lines to get in, one-way aisles, U-Scan bottlenecks, and $2/hour ‘hero’ pay


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SDOT: E Union will finally get its protected bike lanes this month

(Image: 2020 Cycle)

The Central District’s 2020 Cycle is surely geared up for the occasion. Construction is set to begin for the remarkably speedy installation of new protected bike lanes running by the shop serving E Union between Capitol Hill and MLK.

Here is the latest from the Seattle Department of Transportation on the project:

We’re scheduled to construct the E Union St Protected Bike Lane on the weekend of April 24 – 25*! Our crews will begin site preparation work as soon as April 19. We will be installing a protected bike lane on both sides of E Union St between 14th Ave and 26th Ave and an uphill protected bike lane with downhill sharrow (permanent marking on the road to indicate shared lane between vehicles and bicycles) between 26th Ave and MLK Jr Way.

SDOT has distributed a construction notification, embedded below, in the area around the route. Continue reading

CHS photographer honored for rendering aid — and getting the picture — in 11th and Pine protest shooting

Photographer Alex Garland chats with Daniel Gregory at the Martin Luther King Jr. Day march in January (Image courtesy: Michael Barkin)

Seattle photographer Alex Garland has added a lot to CHS news coverage of Capitol Hill over the years. Last summer, Garland, as usual, found himself in the middle of an important neighborhood news story and, as usual, he got the picture.

But as gunfire rang out in a crowd of hundreds of people and dozens of police and National Guard troops in a June protest at 11th and Pine, Garland’s role became much more than photojournalist as he moved to quickly render aid to Dan Gregory, an unarmed Black Lives Matter protester shot as he tried to disarm Nikolas Fernandez, the brother of an East Precinct officer, after Fernandez drove into a demonstration crowd at 11th and Pine.

This week, the National Press Photographers Association recognized Garland with its Humanitarian Award as part of its 2020 honors:

On June 7, 2020, Garland, a freelance photographer, reporter and writer, was photographing a protest against police brutality and racism in Seattle. Garland was closeby when Dan Gregory was shot in the arm as he attempted to stop the driver of a vehicle that appeared to be heading towards a throng of protesters.

“I care deeply about documenting the moment, but ultimately I see myself as a community member as much as a journalist,” Garland writes about the moment at 11th and Pine when he decided he needed to put aside his camera and act. Continue reading

The PPP of live music and theater, Shuttered Venue Operators Grant program could boost recovery of Capitol Hill clubs and stages

(Image: Neumos)

Capitol Hill’s struggling live music, theater, and performance venues can join thousands of businesses across the country Thursday as the Small Business Administration finally begins accepting Shuttered Venue Operators Grant applications.

SVOG is the PPP of club and theater rescue plans with $16 billion lined up to help venues recover from a year of pandemic shutdowns. The first come, first served grant program is open to live music venues, performance theaters, small movie theaters, and even destinations like museums and aquariums.

CHS reported here on worries about potential losses in Capitol Hill’s live music and performance scenes as venues like Neumos and Chop Suey as well as small theaters struggled through pandemic restrictions. Velocity Dance has already announced the closure of its 12th Ave studio and a search for a new home after 24 years on Capitol Hill.

For applicants, SVOG joins a complicated matrix of federal assistance including PPP and Economic Injury Disaster Loans. The Seattle Office of Economic Development is offering assistance to help the city’s venues weigh options and apply for help. Continue reading

New salon and spa suite rental space on Broadway has its first customer — Pike/Pine’s Emerson Salon moving in

(Image: Emerson Salon)

A new hair and beauty venture set to open on Capitol Hill is already shaking up the neighborhood salon scene.

Emerson Salon, one of the first new Capitol Hill business CHS reported on when it opened more than a decade ago in Pike/Pine, is undergoing a shift in ownership and making a big change — leaving its longtime E Pike shopfront to be part of the new Mosaic Salon and Spa Studios on Broadway.

“Lancer and I are VERY excited to continue serving hair clients as individual service businesses on Capitol Hill inside Emerson Salon. It will stay a SAFE SPACE for LGBTQIA & BIPOC in Seattle,” D’Arcy Harrison said in the announcement of the change.

As part of the changes, Harrison said she is taking over full ownership with former co-owner Lancer Forney-McMahon staying on as a stylist with the new Emerson. Continue reading

To protect those living in cars, Sawant calls for end of Seattle’s ’72-hour rule’

District 3 City Council representative Kshama Sawant is calling for the city’s to reinstate its suspension of restrictions that prohibit motor vehicles from being parked on streets for more than 72 hours.

Mayor Jenny Durkan and SDOT officials reinstated the rule this month after a year of pandemic moratoriums.

“For people forced to live in their cars – many of them working people – Durkan’s move could be catastrophic, costing them not only their vehicle, but also their only shelter and all their possessions,” Sawant writes. “The pandemic has worsened the severe housing crisis. We need affordable, social housing – not harassment of neighbors struggling to survive.”

The easing of Seattle parking restrictions last March including the city’s “72-hour rule” was positioned as a way to help residents get through stay at home restrictions during the COVID-19 crisis. Many on Capitol Hill celebrated the temporary end of having to shuffle their cars around the neighborhood’s high demand street parking every three days to avoid a ticket. Continue reading

City honors outgoing chief librarian after ten years of Seattle Public Library service

(Image: Seattle Public Library)

The City of Seattle is honoring a decade of service from the Seattle Public Library’s chief librarian and executive director Marcellus Turner as he is stepping down from the position.

The Seattle City Council honored Turner on Monday with a proclamation recognizing his contributions to the city’s literary culture.

“Turner led the Seattle Public Library during two successful levies in 2012 and 2019. He prioritized equality by eliminating overdue fines and allowing people without proof of residence access to library materials,” the announcement of the proclamation reads. “Additionally, Turner led pioneering programs such as adding wi-fi hotspots to circulation so more households have access to the internet, and installing a social worker at the Central Library to better serve Seattle’s homelessness communities.” Continue reading

Pondering future growth and development, St. Mark’s receives major property gift

(Image: St. Mark’s)

The St. Nicholas building, north of the cathedral (Image: St. Mark’s)

By Jethro Swain

A major gift is helping an important Capitol Hill spiritual community shape the future of its 10th Ave E home.

This fall, Capitol Hill’s St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral was donated full ownership of the St. Nicholas school building by the Laura Ellen and Robert Muglia Family Foundation. The property is worth $8.4 million according to the latest county appraisal.

The St. Nicholas building, adjacent the church and purchased from the Cornish College of Arts in an LLC partnership by Saint Mark’s and the Muglia Foundation in 2003, is primarily used by two independent schools, the Bright Water Waldorf School and Gage Academy of Arts, but is also a hub for a variety of nonprofits in the community. Continue reading

This week in CHS history | COVID — masks? Plus, tofu shortage!, 2018 — Club Z building sale, 2016 — Ingrid Lyne murder


Here are the top stories from this week in CHS history:

2020

 

In fight to survive pandemic crisis and save 600 jobs, Capitol Hill-headquartered Rudy’s Barbershops declares bankruptcy

Solving the great Capitol Hill COVID-19 tofu shortage of 2020


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Capitol Hill’s Seattle Asian Art Museum set for May reopening

(Image: Seattle Asian Art Museum)

Most people have never seen the overhauled and expanded Seattle Asian Art Museum in person. The Volunteer Park museum shuttered in mid-March 2020 as COVID-19 numbers climbed. Only weeks earlier that February, the building had reopened after three years of closure and construction to overhaul and expand the museum.

Starting May 28th, SAAM will be ready to welcome visitors again: Continue reading