‘Zero waste’ Scoop Marketplace makes Earth Day debut at The Works on 12th Ave

(Image: The Scoop Marketplace)

(Image: The Scoop Marketplace)

12th Ave DIY community, class, and retail provider The Works has sprouted a new friend to help with your zero waste ambitions this Earth Day. The growing 12th Ave class and retail space is now home to Scoop Marketplace, a grocery dedicated to efficient and package-free shopping.

The new market debuts Monday with a sale, giveaways, along with The Works hosting an Earth Day plant swap.

“Scoop Marketplace was founded out of a need for a grocery store that facilitates low impact living,” Scoop founder Stephanie Lentz says. “Our family was always naturally inclined toward environmentalism, but we didn’t realize just how much thoughtless consumerism we were taking part in. Once we embraced the zero waste lifestyle, we were eager to change our family routines, and eliminate waste. The changes definitely haven’t happened overnight, but the slow process has helped us better understand our relationship with food, possessions, and the things we throw away.” Continue reading

Will workers bring Little Big Burger’s Little Big Union to Capitol Hill? — UPDATE: Now open

(Image: Little Big Union)

Portland’s Little Big Burger is coming to Capitol Hill soon. iIs workers could bring a fast food labor movement here, too.

In mid-March, Little Big Burger workers in Portland, led by staff at one location, went public with their decision to unionize, a rarity for fast food personnel, following issues of safety, scheduling, and what it says are inadequate pay raises. After talking to workers at other locations of the chain, workers realized that their concerns were widespread across restaurants.

“Conditions, you know, needed to change,” said Cameron Crowell, a union member who has worked at Little Big Burger in Portland for two years.

The union’s demands include $5 raises, two weeks of both paid sick leave and vacation time, fair and consistent scheduling ahead of time, and time and a half for all federal holidays, according to its website. Continue reading

Old Capitol Hill makes a comeback at Scratch Deli turned Capitol Hill Vaudeville vintage market and cafe

Ferdous Ahmed
(Image: Orlin Nedkov)

Early this year, Lisa Sandoval — who goes by Vera Violet — was having coffee on the hill but felt like a hearty sandwich. She decided to go to Scratch Deli. When she got to the door, she learned, to her surprise, that it was closed. “So I ran down to Bergman’s [Lock & Key] next door, and I’m like: What happened?”

It turned out that the beloved 12th Ave. sandwich shop had shuttered for good in December after six years on the Hill.

Now, Sandoval is renting the over 100-years-old house herself. Mid-March, during the Capitol Hill Art Walk, she and Capitol Hill fixture Ferdous Ahmed reopened Scratch Deli as Capitol Hill Vaudeville, a DIY vintage market, and cafe. Continue reading

Hooters ‘coming soon’ to Capitol Hill

A Capitol Hill future prophesied by pranksters in 2007 is becoming reality. It is true. Hooters is coming to Capitol Hill.

Kind of.

Portland-born Little Big Burger, gobbled up by North Carolina-based Chanticleer Holdings in 2015, is rumbling toward an opening at 12th and Pike in a long-awaited buildout of tenant space in the Beryl Apartments mixed-use development that rose on the corner more than three years ago. Continue reading

Yes, there is a Nazi connection to these Capitol Hill chains

Craft beer. Journalism. Coffee. Sometimes issues in the global industrial marketplace reverberate all the way to 12th Ave thanks to Capitol Hill business connections to worldwide conglomerates.

Fascism watchers of Seattle social media, you can stop messaging CHS. We’ll make sure people are aware. If it helps inform your latte buying decisions, know that Panera Bread and Stumptown Coffee have, well, a Nazi past:

“It is all correct,” family spokesman Peter Harf, who is one of two managing partners of JAB Holdings, told Bild. “Reimann Senior and Reimann Junior were guilty. The two men have passed away, but they actually belonged in prison.”

Reports document the use of forced labor and support for Hitler by the German family whose company owns controlling stakes in a massive portfolio of companies with brands familiar to Seattle consumers including Stumptown. Continue reading

Capitol Hill’s 12th Ave Arts hoped to be a sign of things to come with Seattle’s Mandatory Housing Affordability expansion

Mayor Jenny Durkan and city officials were on Capitol Hill Wednesday to sign the city’s new legislation expanding Mandatory Housing Affordability requirements and upzoning to Seattle’s densest neighborhoods, the largest step yet in addressing the city’s ongoing affordability crisis, and likely part of more to come if Seattle is to reach its ambitious goals for new affordable units over the next decade. The signing took place in the lobby of 12th Ave Arts where the 88 units of affordable housing are an example of how the new development fees will be put to work creating new places to live in an increasingly expensive city.

“The reason 12th Ave Arts was selected for this event is that the housing component was funded in part by city Incentive Zoning funds, the precursor to MHA,” Chris Persons, CEO of 12th Ave Arts nonprofit developer Capitol Hill Housing, said Wednesday.

“What was built here is far more than 88 units of affordable housing. We built community. The mission of Capitol Hill Housing is not simply to build housing. Our core purpose is to build vibrant and engaged communities”

Monday, the Seattle City Council voted unanimously to pass the legislation expanding its MHA program to 27 neighborhoods across the city including Capitol Hill. MHA ties those upzones to the creation of affordable units either by requiring a portion of new housing to be made available at affordable rates or by requiring developers to pay into funding to build affordable housing elsewhere across the city.

The expansion signed Wednesday will also transition a reported 6% of Seattle’s current single family-zoned property to allow denser development.

The city says more than 45,000 Seattle households spend greater than 50% of their income on housing. MHA-generated housing will create a rent-restricted two-bedroom apartment for a family of four earning $60,200 would be $1,353, the city says. For an individual making less than $42,150, a one-bedroom would cost $1,128.

In a sample of recent ad listing for Capitol Hill apartments, a one-bedroom unit currently lists for around $1,800 — up only about 3% from a sampling we made this time of year in 2015 when rents had already exploded across the region.

The most significant changes to Capitol Hill zoning will come along Broadway from around Cal Anderson Park all the way north to Roy with plans to implement 75-foot height limits and “neighborhood commercial” zoning to allow seven-story buildings with commercial use throughout. Continue reading

A Violet man: After years in Amazon-town, Seattle chef William Belickis arrives on Capitol Hill

(Image: Karel Tomanek)

The blue street sign, propped up against an exposed-concrete pillar in the middle of the new Capitol Hill restaurant Violet, is easy to miss at first. Somewhat hiding behind a large table lamp, it reads “Place du Mistral.”

A dedicated fan of William Belickis’ Belltown and Denny Triangle restaurants Mistral and Mistral Kitchen once stole it from a village in the Provence and brought it back as a tribute.

It is the sole memento the veteran Seattle chef brought from his previous restaurants to his new endeavor Violet. Belickis’ new American-Mediterranean restaurant took over from the Durango-flavored restaurant Chavez, which closed after four years on 12th Ave.

For about 16 years, Belickis ran two restaurants with Mistral — which is the name of a strong Mediterranean wind— in the name. His intimate, 40-seat Belltown restaurant Mistral closed after eight and a half years, as did the highly-regarded and high-end 5,000-square-foot Mistral Kitchen early last year. Continue reading

CHS Pics | A Washington Beer Open House at Capitol Hill’s Outer Planet Brewing

It may be Seattle Cocktail Week but Capitol Hill’s pocket of craft beer brewers — large and really small — opened their doors last Saturday for the annual Washington Beer Open House, a statewide celebration of the brewing industry.

CHS stopped by the teeniest of the bunch to enjoy the festivities. 12th Ave nanobrewery Outer Planet Brewing — yes, it really is located at street level below microhousing — just marked its fourth year brewing on Capitol Hill with new faces joining ownership including Jeff Linse and Gabriel Villenave. Continue reading

CHS Pics | No New Youth Jail Valentines at 12th and Alder

Activists may have lost in court but they haven’t given up on winning hearts in their battle against the new youth jail at 12th and Alder.

Saying she and fellow activists were there to celebrate Valentine’s Day and “what it means to love community and love young people,” activist and attorney Nikkita Oliver said a group gathered outside the under construction King County Youth and Family Justice Center would be delivering No New Youth Jail Valentines to officials and judges.

“We are here to uplift ourselves and love ourselves and say we’re not going to allow buildings like this to be built and invested in,” Oliver said. Continue reading

Ready for big decisions on center’s future on Capitol Hill, Velocity Dance names new executive director

(Image: Ron Rogers/Velocity Dance Center)

Catherine Nueva España (Image: Timothy Mowrer)

Catherine Nueva España is the new executive director of Velocity Dance Center. Nueva España, a Seattle-based nonprofit consultant, dancer, and teacher, has been chosen to fill the shoes of Tonya Lockyer, who departed Velocity after 16 years with the organization.

Former associate producer Erin Johnson, who has taken on the role of interim artistic director in December, will oversee programming in 2019 as Velocity “explores different options for how to fill the role of artistic director in the future.”

Nueva España will start on February 19th. She comes to Velocity from local nonprofit 501 Commons, where she served as the program manager for arts and development and consulted with arts organizations and nonprofits to streamline and stabilize operations. Continue reading