Here’s why there are ‘Black Teen Wearing Hoodie’ images up and down 12th Ave

The 12th Ave arts and business community has responded to an act of vandalism targeting a work exploring the visual legacy of the Black Panther Party by incorporating the image damaged in the attack into their storefronts and buildings.

12th Ave’s Photographic Center Northwest is at the center of the effort: Continue reading

Paper sign in the window season: Goodbye Octo, recover soon Fogon, welcome YoYo Station

An artist rendering of a new sign set to replace the paper sign that went up announcing Broadway’s Tea Republik is no more

When a business dies on Capitol Hill, it can often be a quiet affair — especially in summer, the season of printed paper “closed for remodel” messages. Thanks to CHS readers, we hear about a lot of these signs during the summer months. Not all of them are bad news. Below, as part of CHS’s ongoing duty to keep track of the comings and goings of Capitol Hill, here are some of the signs and business changes we’ve been asked about. Remember that behind every business are people and hopes and dreams so no need to speak ill of the dead and paper-signed. Continue reading

‘A period of redesign’ — Activists say, as planned, new youth jail will be ‘catastrophic’ to county coffers

The coalition formed to stop construction of the new county youth jail facility on 12th Ave said Tuesday that Dow Constantine’s officials have warned that the project could be “catastrophic” to county coffers.

Nikkita Oliver and the No New Youth Jail and People’s Moratorium efforts held a press conference and rally Tuesday morning to announce the findings outside the fences where construction continues on the $200 million-plus youth justice facility that will create a new incarceration facility, and new court and administrative buildings on the county’s campus at 12th and Alder.

“This system is going to traumatize children and separate families,” Oliver said Tuesday.

Continue reading

The last Capitol Hill pizza joint without a pop-up DJ bar

(Image: Southpaw)

Much of Capitol Hill’s recent food and drink news has been about putting existing spaces to use for new projects.

Add Southpaw to the list — though, in the case of John Sundstrom’s 12th Ave pizza joint, the summer news is about making space to add something new.

Starting Thursday, Southpaw will undergo a nightly, weekends-only transformation with a Pop Up Bar from longtime Lark server Fernando Pacheco: Continue reading

Exit Interview: Velocity Dance’s Tonya Lockyer on 16 years in the arts on Capitol Hill

Tonya Lockyer (Image: Bettina Hansen with permission to CHS)

Tonya Lockyer began as a touring artist and educator, eventually finding her roots in Seattle after joining Velocity Dance Center as an artist and completing graduate school at the University of Washington. She went on to be Velocity’s programs and communications manager, and eventually its executive director.

In June, Lockyer announced she will be stepping down from her post this fall after 16 years with the organization.

Entering Velocity in a time of instability, debt, and amid an emergency capital campaign, Lockyer implemented operational and artistic direction and, in just two years, had Velocity operating in the black.

With accolades like the Mayor’s Artz Award, Tonya’s tenure has brought national visibility to the dance center and its residents, acting as the “portal to Seattle dance,” and a destination for touring choreographers. Her leadership influenced exceptional growth in audiences and artist residencies, with consistently sold-out community events and classes.

CHS spoke with Lockyer about how she got involved with Velocity and Seattle’s dance scene, her proudest moments as Artistic Executive Director, the importance of dance for our community, and what’s next for her.

How did you get involved with Velocity?: When I first moved to Seattle, I was teaching and I ran into a Seattle choreographer and said that I was moving to Seattle. She said, “Seattle is great, and my friend KT Niehoff needs someone to stay in her house!” So the very first place I ever lived was in the home of the co-founder of Velocity, KT Niehoff. Continue reading

Northwest Film Forum search open for new leader

(Image: NWFF/Elisa Huerta Enochian)

In April, CHS reported on the planned exit of Northwest Film Forum’s executive director Courtney Sheehan after the former intern successfully transitioned the organization to a new mission beyond the screen.

NWFF is now searching for a new director to take over after Sheehan’s departure:

The Executive Director is a collaborative, visionary leader joining Northwest Film Forum (NWFF) in an exciting time of programmatic and operational evolution. No longer focused on film as art for art’s sake, NWFF’s current model centers equity, collective action, and community coalition-building as instrumental to creating and presenting film and media arts. The Executive Director will leverage collective resources to build and maintain community alliances and equitable operations. Our current growth is marked by vibrant programs overseen by a talented team, increases in membership and public attendance, grassroots community partnerships, and positive fiscal health. The Executive Director will champion the organization and build resources and capacity for NWFF’s mission and programs. As leader of a small but mighty organization, the Executive Director will balance high level roles and responsibilities to oversee NWFF’s artistic vision, strategic and financial direction, charting a dynamic course for the organization’s ongoing evolution and growth.

It’s a cool job for an organization that has played an important role in providing a space for arts on 12th Ave. If you are interested or know somebody who be a good fit, applications are being accepted through July 20th.

CHS Pics | France vs. Uruguay on 12th Ave

Fans at Cafe Presse

World Cup drama continued Friday morning as France took on Uruguay in the first quarterfinal match of the tournament. The crowd at 12th Ave’s Cafe Presse was as partisan as you might expect. Warning: Contains spoilers!

The game was relatively tame until Uruguay’s Martin Caceres came inches away from turning a header past Hugo Lloris, but the French goalkeeper made a full-stretch save with the tip of his fingers to keep the score tied at zero. Minutes later, the tide turned in favor of the French. Continue reading

Northwest Film Forum performance art will explore dance, taxidermy, and 12th Ave history

(Image: Bret Doss with permission to CHS)

Earlier this year, CHS told you about the coming departure of Northwest Film Forum executive director Courtney Sheehan from the Capitol Hill nonprofit and the continuation of her work to transition the organization beyond the screen with events, speakers, and gatherings. Later this month, the final NWFF event before Sheehan makes her exit will be a showcase of the organization’s most important qualities.

What is Home will be “a participatory experience” that encompasses “movement installations, interactive exhibits, dance films, and a layered dance theater performance.”

“The work has many points of entry for both film and dance audiences, with a central question about home, belonging and change that will resonate with all walks of Seattle life,” Sheehan tells CHS. “There will be a lot of history of Capitol Hill and specifically the NWFF building woven into the piece.”

CHS talked with the show’s Christin Call of Coriolis Dance to discuss the inspiration behind What is Home, and the place performance art has in communities like Capitol Hill. Call explores the lessons from the “booms” and “crashes” in life, and the importance and meaning of “home.” Call also has plenty to say about the history of Capitol Hill, the current scope of a booming city, and what we can take away from performance art and stories from our communities in how we live day-to-day.

You describe What Is Home as a participatory experience,” “absurdly imaginary,” and “ridiculously ornate.” What does it all mean? It is a multimedia piece, with installation, with film, with live performance, and it is designed to be an event that immerses the audience. Pulling from a lot of resources is why it is ornate. This comes from the idea that we can’t help but to do that, to create, psychologically, these super intricate webs of relations between ourselves and how we fit into this web, and we just do it naturally. We don’t really have to try, sometimes, to dismantle these types of things. Continue reading

Capitol Hill Community Post | 12th Avenue Stewards donate chairs to 12th Ave Square Park

From the 12th Avenue Stewards 

In time for the 4th of July, 12th Avenue Stewards donated five movable “adirondack” chairs to 12th Avenue Square Park at 12th and E. James Court. The colorful chairs provide impromptu seating for visitors to relax and soak up the sunshine.

12th Avenue Square Park includes the Cloud Veil sculpture and the bouncy, blue, round informal stage. The sculpture features 9 convex mirrors gathering and reflecting the scene. An oversized picnic table is one of the popular features in the park. Continue reading

Neighborhood grant will help power new South Asian literary festival from 12th Ave’s Tasveer

12th Ave’s Tasveer’s grant will help power a new literary festival (Image: Tasveer)

The Seattle Department of Neighborhoods has selected four District 3 projects to receive more than $200,000 in 2018 Neighborhood Matching Fund support. The awards are part of more than $1 million in matching funds for 22 community-based projects announced this week.

Included in the District 3 grants is money to support a December literary event from 12th Ave-headquartered Tasveer, a nonprofit dedicated to South Asian films and art.

The full roster of District 3 awards is below:

  • $60,000 to Tasveer for the Desi X NW festival, a six-day literary and storytelling event in December featuring poets, novelists, and other writers from the South Asian community. The festival includes workshops on writing fiction, comedy, screenplays and graphic novels. (Community match: $37,500)
  • $96,000 for the Borealis Festival of Light, a nightly display of light art in South Lake Union Park and surrounding areas this October. The festival will feature live music, street art performances, lighting art installations, and multi-media projections on surrounding structures. (Community match: $162,800)
  • $28,000 to African Ethnic Media of Seattle for the Community Connect Through Ethnic Media project training ten youth ages 16 to 21 in video production, broadcast techniques, interview and research practices, journalistic writing, and documentary methods. (Community match: $30,300)
  • $28,000 to BEGO, Inc. for the Ethiopian Heritage Arts and Music Festival 2018, a free all-day event featuring Ethiopian musicians, dancers, artists, food, family activities, and multi-cultural performances in collaboration with the Duwamish community. (Community match: $69,500)