This week in CHS history | COVID-19: Restrictions extended, grocery store changes, 2018: 30 years of Vivace, 2011: Block Party adds third day


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2020

 

Washington extends COVID-19 restrictions another month

More COVID-19 tweaks to Capitol Hill grocery shopping: lines to get in, one-way aisles, U-Scan bottlenecks, and $2/hour ‘hero’ pay


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This week in CHS history | COVID — masks? Plus, tofu shortage!, 2018 — Club Z building sale, 2016 — Ingrid Lyne murder


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2020

 

In fight to survive pandemic crisis and save 600 jobs, Capitol Hill-headquartered Rudy’s Barbershops declares bankruptcy

Solving the great Capitol Hill COVID-19 tofu shortage of 2020


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This week in CHS history | COVID: ‘Peak’ outbreak predicted, 2019: Orion challenges Sawant, 2011: Pine/Pike prank


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2020

 

New views of Seattle’s COVID-19 crisis: a forecast for ‘peak’ outbreak and a count of confirmed cases around Capitol Hill and the Central District — UPDATE


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This week in CHS history | COVID — Cal Anderson cleared and ‘stay home’ restrictions, 2018 — March for Our Lives, 2011- Pot on Broadway


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2020

 

Seattle Police clear Cal Anderson Park over COVID-19 concerns — ‘Your current conduct is placing yourself and your fellow Seattleites in danger’

‘Hunker down’ — Washington implements full COVID-19 ‘stay home’ restrictions — UPDATE: List of industries and businesses that can remain open


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This week in CHS History | First COVID-19 restrictions, Ghost Note Coffee and Dino’s Tomato Pie grand openings, Capitol Hill Station debut


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2020

 

Washington steps up COVID-19 restrictions — Seattle restaurants and bars must close or go takeout or delivery only

A trip to a Central District grocery store during an outbreak in Seattle: picked over shelves, heroic workers, and ‘at risk shopper’ hours


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This week in CHS history | First COVID-19 headlines, Bonney Watson demolition, Capitol Lounge debut


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2020

 

With first ‘presumptive positive’ COVID-19 case in King County, here’s what officials are saying about spread and preparation — UPDATE: First U.S. death here


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Celebrate the Central District’s jazz legacy as this weekend’s 2021 Jackson Street Jazz Walk goes virtual

The Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio

South Jackson’s celebration of its jazz legacy returns this weekend with a virtual version of the annual Jackson Street Jazz Walk.

“One of the hottest jazz spots in the country in the 1940s was along Seattle’s Jackson Street, with clubs that saw early performances from then-local stars Ray Charles, Quincy Jones and Ernestine Anderson,” KNXK says about the street’s history.

Saturday and Sunday, you can enjoy the Jackson Street Jazz Walk from home as the event returns following its 2020 postponement. 2021’s performances will include the Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio, Eugenie Jones Jazz Band, a Lewis vs. Lewis Drum-off with David Lewis, D’Vonne Lewis, and Donovon Lewis), Alex Dugdale, Julio Jáuregui, Rafael Tranquilino, and the Darrius Willrich Trio. Continue reading

This week in CHS history | Amazon Go opens, Unicorn turns 10, Hot Mama’s comedy


Here are the top stories from this week in CHS history:

2020

 

Amazon Go Grocery now open on Capitol Hill

You’ve heard about H Mart, here’s how the rest of Capitol Hill Station’s mix of retail, food, drink, daycare, and new home for the farmers market is shaping up


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This week in CHS history | Salt and Straw Capitol Hill opens, Club Z building hits market, ‘another night of SPD protests’


Here are the top stories from this week in CHS history:

2020

 

One of Broadway’s ‘earliest extant buildings’ the next facing demolition plans in wave of redevelopment — UPDATE

A chain that lasted 10 years on Capitol Hill, Panera Bread set to close on Broadway


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A monument of Capitol Hill’s restricted Black history, Cayton-Revels House considered for landmarks protection

Susie Revels Cayton

Capitol Hill’s Cayton-Revels House, once home to Susie Revels Cayton, daughter to the first U.S. Senator of African descent and a writer, newspaper editor and leader in Seattle’s black community, will be considered for official landmarks protections later this month.

The 1902-built 14th and Thomas Mercer structure now used as a rental triplex is marked as both a historical residence of an important Black family in Seattle history and a manifestation of structural racism.

“Horace Roscoe Cayton, his wife Susie Sumner Revels Cayton, and their family lived at 518 14th 1​ Avenue East from 1902 ​to 1909,” the nomination proposal reads. “The Caytons were one of only three Black American families living in today’s definition of Capitol Hill​ before racial restrictive covenants barred non-white residents in 1927.​”

CHS reported here on the restrictive covenants of the era that shaped the modern Capitol Hill and Central District neighborhoods. Continue reading