This week in CHS history | 2020 full COVID-19 ‘stay home’ restrictions, anti-duckling measures at Volunteer Park, Sawant recall attempt begins

Recall Sawant representative Harry Bridger (Image: CHS)

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2021

 

Plan for new City Market building: eight stories, mass timber, and a new home for the longtime Capitol Hill grocery — UPDATE

What the duck! Capitol Hill waterfowl question Seattle Parks over anti-duckling measures at Volunteer Park lily ponds


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This week in CHS history | 2020’s first COVID-19 lockdown, Seattle passes Mandatory Housing Affordability plan, ‘Occupy’ Chase 5 verdict


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2021

 

‘The most precarious situation that we’ve ever seen’ — Seattle considers right to counsel and extending COVID-19 crisis eviction moratorium through 2021 — UPDATE


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This week in CHS history | First ‘presumptive positive’ COVID-19 case in King County, Holy Names underground parking fight, the Marion Apartments come down

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2021

 

On path for ‘70%,’ Seattle announces location for mass vaccination mega site

City has few answers in neighborhood meeting over Miller Playfield encampments


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This week in CHS history | Dreams of the Capitol Hill gondola, First Hill McDonald’s demolition, Unicorn birthday, Amazon Go arrives on Hill


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2021

 

Surrounded by taller buildings with room for more people on all sides, two 1906-built houses set to finally make way for development on Bellevue Ave E

One struck and killed, driver to hospital in 10th Ave E crash


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This week in CHS history | Snowbruary 2021, Mexican Consulate comes to Capitol Hill, Mamnoon plans


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2021

 

QFC to shutter 15th Ave E grocery as company axes two Seattle stores over COVID-19 hazard pay — UPDATE

Snowbruary 2021: Capitol Hill pictures and videos of snowiest day since 1969

Seattle Fire Department employee arrested after ‘threats to councilmember’ — UPDATE


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This week in CHS history | Overhauled Seattle Asian Art Museum reopens, 23rd and Jackson Red Apple demolished, Snowbruaries past


Here are the top stories from this week in CHS history:

2021

 

Everyday Music’s planned closure will leave CD-sized hole in Capitol Hill’s record shop scene

Suspect shot and killed by police in Central District was maintenance man with history of threats at Urban League Village apartments


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This week in CHS history | 2019 snow, The Stranger leaves Hill, R Place loses lease, goodbye to Basic Plumbing


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2021

 

It will be affordable and environmentally innovative but here’s why a neighbor is fighting plans for the cross-laminated timber Heartwood Apartments

Capitol Hill gay club R Place loses lease and begins search for new home


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CHS Classics | Capitol Hill’s (smaller than you might think) place in Seattle grunge music history

CHS first ran this list of Capitol Hill’s shorter than expected list of grunge era landmarks a decade ago. Nice thing about history — things don’t change much. With KEXP in full nostalgia mode on its 50th anniversary and thanks to some inspiration from this poster for a 1987 show at the Canterbury unearthed by the PNW Music Archives, CHS is again counting it down.

Seattle may have birthed the hard crunch of rock and roll grunge but most of Capitol Hill’s stages we know weren’t born when it happened. The ones that were there have mostly faded away. There is no live music at today’s Canterbury — and the pounding of Soundgarden would most definitely not be welcomed by the apartment dwellers above. How they felt about it in 1987? Unclear. A decade ago, CHS described Capitol Hill’s role in grunge history as overstated thanks to Cameron Crowe. Grunge was, indeed, “born” around Belltown, the International District, and Pioneer Square. But the rockers did live and drink here. And, according to the histories, more played here than you might remember.

Here is a quick and dirty look at some points of interest from Capitol Hill’s place in Seattle’s grunge history. If you were here and know of a landmark or two we should consider, add a comment.

  • Odd Fellows Hall: Before the growth of the Hill’s live music and nightlife scene, one of the most important performance venues on the Hill was the Odd Fellows Hall. It was also a much different place than the overhauled building we know now. The U-Men, possibly the first “true” grunge band, rocked the old rafters. Today, we’re betting a U-Man or two may have sampled a delicious Oddfellows brunch. Continue reading