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Final designs take shape for new four-story neighbor behind Dingfelder’s Deli

The latest design for 14th and Pine from Revolve

A four-story building could rise from the empty lot behind Dingfelder’s Deli at 14th Ave E and E Pine as early as this summer.

The project at 1320 E Pine is being built by Seattle-based Revolve Development, and it is set to come before the Design Review Board Wednesday.

The proposal would create an L-shaped building that will wrap around the existing deli (the building housing Dingfelder’s is not part of the development and will remain) and touch both 14th Ave and Pine next to Seattle Fire Station 25. The plans call for 79 residential units, with a mix of studio, 1 – and 2-bedroom units, the bulk of which will be studios. It will also have about 1,700 square feet of commercial space along Pine.

John Schack, founder of Revolve, said the development company plans to install a type 1 shaft in the commercial space which would allow for a potential restaurant tenant to operate a full kitchen. Schack said the plan is to have either a restaurant, other food and drink type establishment, or retail in the space.

“We are committing to food and beverage, or some type of retail that would create some type of interactive space on the street,” he said.


1320 E Pine St

Land Use Application to allow a 4-story, 79-unit apartment building with retail. Parking for 29 vehicles proposed. Early Design Guidance Review conducted under 3032046-EG. View Design Proposal  (34 MB)    

Review Meeting
January 27, 2021 5:00 pm

Meeting: https://bit.ly/Mtg3033207

Listen Line: 206-207-1700 Passcode: 146 053 1378
Comment Sign Up: https://bit.ly/Comment3033207
Review Phase
REC–Recommendation  

Project Number

Planner
David Sachs — Email comments to PRC@seattle.gov


 

Schack said they also pulled back the building’s frontage along pine to allow for outside dining, should a restaurant tenant come in.

The building will have 28 parking spaces, which will access to 14th. Schack said that his company has seen a drop in demand for parking, even just since 2014 when a different project had about 60 percent of residents seek parking spaces. Now that number is closer to 30 percent, which Schack said is an overall positive. All parking would be set aside for residents.

There are plans for a private courtyard on the ground floor and a rooftop deck with a greenhouse among other amenities.

The façade along 14th calls for what looks like irregularly stacked boxes. The boxes will have metallic edges, and be interspersed with windows and cedar siding. These boxes will wrap around the back of the building facing away from Pine, toward the existing residential buildings. The ground floor apartments along 14th will have their own entrances.

The same design concept will follow along the parts of the residential portion which touches Pine Street. The commercial space, wedged in between the existing building and the fire station, will be a double-height area to give it more visibility. Inside there are plans for a mezzanine in the back of the space.

The same box concept will be in place for the parts of the building which will be over the exiting deli, and the parts which face the fire station. However, those areas will not have windows.

The development team recently presented the design proposal to the Pike-Pine Urban Neighborhood Council. It was very well received, and for at least one council member, brought to mind another of the developer’s Capitol Hill projects, The Yardhouse, at 14th Ave E and E Republican.

“It has among the highest levels of care in its design and detailing of any multi-family project we have seen in the last decade. My confidence in saying that is in part due to the way that the applicant’s previous project – The Yardhouse – has aged as well as it has during its 8-year life. Their new project has a similar, if not even greater, level of care in its execution,” said John Feit, chair of PPUNC — the Pike/Pine Urban Neighborhood Council.

If permitting and other administrative steps go as planned, Schack said they hope to break ground on construction this summer. Construction will likely take about 18 months.

Details about the proposal are available online. The Design Review Board meeting is scheduled for 5 PM Jan. 27. As with all review meetings currently, this will be held virtually. Information about how to provide comments and how to watch the meeting are available on the city’s website.


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Nope
Nope
3 months ago

That “private courtyard” will be a dark and dreary place. Nothing will grow there except moss and a few ferns.

UghWhy
UghWhy
3 months ago

I’m sure the residents and restaurant patrons are going to LOVE the blaring sirens from the fire station next door.

caphiller
caphiller
3 months ago
Reply to  UghWhy

One imagines the rent prices in the building will reflect this downside vs comparable units on quieter blocks…

CD Neighbor
CD Neighbor
3 months ago
Reply to  UghWhy

I don’t know that I’d want to have to sleep that close to the station, but as far as patronizing a restaurant, I can’t say that the fire house has ever been bothersome or kept me away from the 3 that sit kitty corner to it on 14th, so I doubt next door would be a problem either.

dave
dave
3 months ago

cool – I love the use of wood siding

Nah
Nah
3 months ago

Guessing the courtyard may also amplify/echo those sirens for all the interior units?

With all the construction and traffic, maybe the City will also repair 14th Ave potholes.

Sigh
Sigh
3 months ago

This plot of land would have benefitted the community more by being turned into a park. Not sure if the developers spend much time in the area because those sirens are LOUD and frequent.

The Ghostt of Capitol Hill
The Ghostt of Capitol Hill
3 months ago

Any objections to relocating our unsheltered neighbors to that courtyard while it’s under construction??

Ryan Packer
Ryan Packer
3 months ago

Are warm, city owned properties already full?

JCW
JCW
3 months ago

This is a joke, right? Obviously you’ve never been near an active construction site.

Spencer Fairbanks
Spencer Fairbanks
3 months ago

Awful, ugly stacked upon eyesore. Bit by bit they are destroying Capitol Hill with these boxes that all look the same. Sad. At least the excellent Dingfelders will remain.

Marco
Marco
3 months ago

The houses they tear down are in really poor condition though. I don’t understand why so many home owners didn’t take care of them for decades.

Sigh
Sigh
3 months ago
Reply to  Marco

They are building this on a current gravel parking lot, you know this yes?

Bob
Bob
3 months ago
Reply to  Sigh

There is a deli there now, you know this yes?

Okayyy
Okayyy
3 months ago
Reply to  Bob

The deli isn’t being torn down, it’s the parking lot around it being developed. Read, people.