911 | Police: Driver arrested after allegedly trying to run over pedestrians in dispute over Capitol Hill street performer

 

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See something others should know about? Email CHS or call/txt/Signal (206) 399-5959. You can view recent CHS 911 coverage here. Hear sirens and wondering what’s going on? Check out Twitter reports from @jseattle or tune into the CHS Scanner page.

  • Alleged SUV assault: A former Capitol Hill business owner was taken into custody early Saturday after police say he drove his SUV onto a sidewalk and allegedly tried to run over two people along Bellevue Ave in an attempted assault sparked by a confrontation with a street performer. According to SPD, the 2 AM Saturday incident started with some kind of dispute between the driver and the performer in which the suspect allegedly use a racial slur. Police say a man and woman confronted the man who made threatening statements. “A short time later, witnesses saw the suspect behind the wheel of an SUV as he drove up onto the sidewalk in the 1700 block of Bellevue Avenue toward the two victims,” the police brief on the arrest reads. Police say the driver allegedly made a u-turn and “unsuccessfully attempted to strike the victims again” before driving from the scene. The victims told police they escaped by ducking into a nearby store. Police say the driver returned to the scene on foot before fleeing once more. Officers found the SUV parked nearby and used registration information to track down and arrest the suspect in Queen Anne. According to King County Jail records, the man was booked for investigation of assault and held until being released Tuesday morning. The 46-year-old suspect, who previously has been part owner of Capitol Hill food and drink businesses, has not been charged. There were no reported serious injuries in the incident.
  • Judkins Park fight: A fight involving multiple juveniles brought a large police response and television media to Judkins Park Monday. Police were called to the report of a group of young people fighting in the park around 12:30 PM. “When officers attempted to engage with potential victims the group became hostile,” the SPD brief on the incident reads. Seattle Fire was called to the scene to treat non-life threatening injuries and at least one person was taken into custody, according to East Precinct radio updates.
  • Deadly I-5 crash: The southbound lanes of I-5 were shut down for nearly six hours Tuesday morning after a victim in an early morning crash fell into the waters below the Ship Canal Bridge. WSDOT says the two-car rollover DUI crash happened around 4:40 AM in the freeway’s southbound lanes. One of the victims was missing after the crash. SPD divers recovered the body in the water below the bridge and the freeway was reopened around 8 AM. The Washington State Patrol said the surviving driver was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence.
 

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A Pike/Pine IPO, Capitol Hill apartment building lined up to be first in Seattle to go public

(Image: Solis)

Wall Street is near bear territory putting investors on the hunt for stock market alternatives. Would you invest your money in an IPO for a Pike/Pine mixed-use apartment building?

In a first for Seattle and Capitol Hill, the “ultra-luxury, ultra-sustainable” Solis at 13th and Pike is being lined up for an initial public offering.

Why Pike/Pine? Jake Weyerhaeuser, vice president for the Seattle region for Lex Markets and co-founder and CTO Jesse Daugherty say it is because the neighborhood is now home to the kind of people they hope take notice of this new type of investment.

Lex, they say, is “targeting retail investors,” “the same kind of people who would live in this building.”

“It’s an exciting place to be,” Weyerhaeuser said.

Even the challenges of CHOP and the social unrest of 2020 can be a market factor.

“For a neighborhood like Capitol Hill, this investment plays in these nationally known communities,” Weyerhaeuser said. “People have heard of it.” Continue reading

Seattle City Council to vote on compromise SPD hiring incentive legislation

The Seattle City Council is set to vote on compromise hiring incentive legislation hoped to break a stalemate on Seattle Police funding and give City Hall more flexibility in recruiting new police officers and other “hard-to-fill city jobs.”

Sponsored by West Seattle’s Lisa Herbold, the legislation up for a final vote Tuesday afternoon would change city rules to allow departments to more easily pay moving expenses for recruits for jobs like police officers, carpenters, truck drivers, The bill also allows SPD to spend funds already in its budget to help with those expenses for new police hires and to add a police recruiter to SPD, among other things. Continue reading

911 | Armored truck guard prompts school lockdown, Broadway bank heist, First Hill carjacking

 

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See something others should know about? Email CHS or call/txt/Signal (206) 399-5959. You can view recent CHS 911 coverage here. Hear sirens and wondering what’s going on? Check out Twitter reports from @jseattle or tune into the CHS Scanner page.

  • SCC lockdown: The paramilitary appearance of a private guard reportedly providing security during a cash pickup at the nearby Walgreens set off concerns and a brief lockdown at Seattle Central College Friday afternoon. According to an update from the school posted to Twitter, the lockdown happened around 12:20 PM after school security received a report of “an armed individual wearing military fatigues” near the Walgreens on E Pine and Broadway. According to the update, SCC security contacted Walgreens and “learned the individual was an armored guard hired to handle their cash transfers” and the school’s lockdown was lifted. Seattle Police were also called to reports of man suffering a possible mental crisis and behaving erratically in the area at the time, complicating the response. Continue reading

Judge denies class action in CHOP ‘deliberate indifference’ lawsuit against city

SDOT officials were on hand as the city placed barriers around the CHOP protest zone in June 2020 (Image: @mmitgang)

A legal bid that could have added hundreds of Capitol Hill residents and businesses to the federal lawsuit against the City of Seattle over “deliberate indifference” in its response to the CHOP occupied protest zone in the summer of 2020 has been denied.

Meanwhile, a handful of Pike/Pine and 12th Ave small businesses that had been part of the suit have dropped out as it continues into its third year of litigation seeking damages from the city over the protest zone.

In a ruling earlier this month, a U.S. District Court judge denied the effort at class certification in the CHOP lawsuit, rejecting arguments from plaintiffs that people living and doing business in a 16-block area near the unrest amid dangerous clashes between campers, demonstrators, and police in the protest zone should be eligible to join the potentially multi-million dollar suit.

Judge Thomas Zilly ruled the lawsuit does not meet the requirements for a class action because of the specific damages to each plaintiff.

“Plaintiffs in this case claim they were subject to diverse harms (violence, vandalism, harassment, blocked streets and sidewalks, excessive noise, and reduced business revenue) caused by the City’s actions, or inaction, in relation to CHOP,” Zilly writes, noting that cases of class action precedent include plaintiffs alleging the same “unlawful harm” like “mass arrest without probable cause,” for example.

Former Mayor Jenny Durkan’s missing text messages from the period continue to loom in the background of the case. Continue reading

Design review: 8-story mixed-use at 12th and Fir

Plans for a new 8-story mixed-use building at 12th and Fir will come before the Central Area Design Review Board Thursday night.

The proposal from developers Kamiak with designs by Hybrid and Hewitt would create an 8-story, 127-unit apartment building with street level retail above a 42-space underground parking garage. Continue reading

Pikes/Pines | Splendor in the grass: The bees and — the what the heck is that-s! — you’ll find in the lawns of Capitol Hill

A yet to be identified bee found nesting in my lawn. (Image: Brendan McGarry)

 

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One of the major benefits of paying attention to the natural world is that no matter how long you’ve been doing it, there’s always more to learn. Within the last five years I’ve gone from knowing honey bees, bumblebees, and mason bees to devoting many hours to the breathtakingly nerdy pursuit of studying the wealth of Washington’s native bees.

The best thing about this real life Pokemon pursuit, (I’ll take running around like an idiot staring at zipping dots any day to chasing things that only exist on my phone), is that I don’t actually have to go that far to get stumped. I can just hang out on a lawn and be a lawn-chair melittologist.

With projects like Pollinator Pathways and Capitol Hill Connections it shouldn’t be surprising that you can find interesting insects on the Hill, let alone a bunch of cool bees. The thing about many invertebrate species is that while some require very specific conditions and host plants that are lacking in urban spaces, they also don’t need the same physical space that, say, a wolf does. Some scrubby ground, some flowers with sufficiently tasty nectar, and a dearth of pesticides and a lot of species make it work or even flourish on the Hill even if we don’t get the same diversity a native prairie would have. Continue reading

This week in CHS history | First Capitol Hill vaccination requirements, Capitol Hill church shuts down, Travelers says goodbye, how they dust the Capitol Hill Station jets

Here are the top stories from this week in CHS history:

2021

 

WANTED: Habitat for Humanity’s search begins for owners for new affordable-for-Seattle condos on Capitol Hill

Amid pandemic’s hate, Seattle Parks considers options for offensive monument in Volunteer Park


Continue reading

Capitol Hill ‘goth shop’ legend The Cramp back from the dead on Broadway

From Olivia in the CHS Facebook Group: “”

KEXP is celebrating World Goth Day, Bauhaus is playing the Paramount.

And The Cramp is ready to haunt Broadway again — and bring traffic to a standstill once more — with its mix of gothic fashion, loud music, and, maybe, live window shows.

Backed by original ownership, the infamous 1988-born Broadway shop has slowly re-materialized — from online presence, to street pop-up at sister store The New York Xchange, and earlier this year into its current incarnation upstairs inside the Broadway Alley building.

Now it is preparing for a full return from the dark fashion grave, braving the daylight of a sidewalk-fronting space in the building and a return to Broadway’s streetlife. Continue reading

Here’s what (good things) happened when residents of Capitol Hill’s La Quinta apartments couldn’t buy their (landmarked) building

 

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(Image: Viva La Quinta/Jesse L. Young)

Declared a historic landmark last year after a lengthy campaign coordinated by a group of residents, La Quinta apartments has been under new ownership since late August. Though its residents were unable to purchase the Spanish-inspired building for themselves as they had originally intended, one tells CHS the new owners have been respectful of their tenants and the historic property.

“At the start of the pandemic we heard word that the building was going to be sold,” said La Quinta resident Chelsea Bolan.

In response, Bolan and fellow residents of the apartments sprang into action with the Viva La Quinta effort, which sought to gain landmark protections for the building and to raise funds for its tenants to purchase the property themselves. CHS reported here on how Seattle’s Notice of Intent to Sell ordinance could help residents like those living in La Quinta buy time to bid on their home property.

But at La Quinta, that never happened. The building sold to a real estate developer. It turns out, so far, everything is fine.

Though the group was ultimately unable to purchase the property before it was sold to its new owners, they were successful in pushing for La Quinta to gain historic landmark status in collaboration with local development authority Historic Seattle. Continue reading