Snowbruary 2019: Our 50+ favorite Capitol Hill pictures and videos

It’s been a month of snow and ice on Capitol Hill. Here are 50 (and a couple more) of our favorite pictures and videos from the run of CHS “Snowbruary 2019” coverage. Thanks for sharing your wintry scenes with CHS. We’ve included many images from the crowd in the mix along with some of our favorite shots and clips from CHS. Something we missed? Let us know in comments. Continue reading

On the List | Valentine’s Capitol Hill Art Walk, Noir City, Capitol Hill Dandy Flea Market

Sure, we’ve seen the Snowpocalypse or Snowmageddon hashtags, but here at CHS, it is all about “Snowbruary.” Find stuff to do during the second week of this month of snow and ice on the CHS Calendar (but please check on social media or by phone about cancellations and closures), or find a list of things that will warm up your soul, and perhaps your Valentine, below.

THURSDAY, Feb. 14: Whether you’re looking to escape V-day or planning on taking date night to new, artsy levels, this month’s Capitol Hill Art Walk is the place to be with a slew of promising art openings. Over at Cupcake Royale, check out I Am Andy Warhol by Seattle artist Blake Blanco, who exhibits a series of portraits painted using Andy Warhols’ Polaroids. Find heartbreak, love, bananas, and ponies at The Factory and burgers plus a concert by Tarsier Eyes during Requiem for Burgerland over at the FoodArt Collection. Various locations Continue reading

SNOWBRUARY 2019 — Wednesday update: Snow routes, schools closed (parents sad), levies renewed (kids happy)

Banks of dirty, wet snow line the edges of Capitol HIll’s streets while sidewalks remain a slushy mess. Cars probably won’t be spinning out once they make it to the street but the new spectator sport is watching people try to dig their cars out. Maybe lend a hand. Here are some wrap-up notes on Snowbruary 2019’s Wednesday.

  • Snow routes: Metro will restore most of its service and buses will operate on snow routes Wednesday morning “on a route-by-route basis,” the county says:
    Riders are encouraged to visit Metro’s MetroWinter.com website for route specific information on Wednesday morning before traveling and sign up for alerts. Online updates are underway for over 200 bus routes and will be available by Wednesday morning.

  • No school: If the parents, grandparents, guardians, and child care pros in your life seem a little rundown, consider that Wednesday is yet another snow day. While the main streets are mostly clear, the soppy conditions moved Seattle Public Schools to declare yet another snow day:
    Schools will be closed on Wednesday, Feb. 13 due to adverse weather conditions. We thank the City of Seattle for their continued and diligent efforts to clear roads including many near our schools. Yet, many sidewalks and walkways are not cleared of ice and slush, and side streets in the north and south ends of the district continue to be icy. All activities, athletics and public meetings are canceled. There will be no preschool or Head Start.
    As for make-up days, the district reminds there are two scheduled — June 21 and 24 — but says the state won’t consider any waiver requests “until after the threat of further weather closures has passed.” UPDATE: Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan said Wednesday the city has been working with Seattle Public School and King County Metro “to discuss immediate next steps to try and get our children back into schools as quickly as possible.” Seattle Schools has workers out clearing sidewalks near its campuses and SDOT road crews are out again pre-treating roads in anticipation of another freeze Wednesday night. As for garbage, crews are out for Monday/Tuesday customers Wednesday with other customers on a one-day delay.
  • Levies: The district is declaring victory in Tuesday’s vote on two school levies. “These two levy replacements will help fund critical day-to-day operations for Seattle Public Schools, including salaries, textbooks and materials, as well as the rebuild of eight aging schools, improved safety and security, increased technology access, and added capacity across our district,” a statement on the successful votes reads.

 

Design review: Is this 20th Ave townhouse project part of Seattle’s ‘missing middle’?

Just build it already. Wednesday night brings a design review for a 20th Ave project that seems like nobody really needs to review — four four-story townhouse buildings creating sixteen new homes replacing a set of two 1909-built single-family style structures that have seen better days.

But the East Design Review Board will give the projects a final once-over Wednesday:

Design review: 1711 20th Ave

Continue reading

Capitol Hill Historical Society | American Sutra book launch at Elliott Bay and remembering the Koba family of Capitol Hill

Normally the story of the period of illegal incarceration of Japanese Americans is told as if they were homogeneous and of one voice. In fact, beyond obvious differences like living in the country or the city, or being American citizens or not, there were other discreet groups within the population of ethnic Japanese in America. An event this week at Elliott Bay Book Co. is a reminder of this diversity and one Capitol Hill family and its apartment building’s place in this history.

On Thursday, February 14 Elliott Bay is hosting a book launch event for Duncan Ryūken Williams’s book American Sutra. It’s the history of Japanese American Buddhists during World War Two.

Williams tells us that the largest group — and the least understood by other Americans — was the Buddhists. The racial discrimination we’re familiar with was not the whole story. It was exacerbated by religious discrimination as well. Buddhists were the focus of early FBI raids, their leaders were subject to separate imprisonment, and their religious activity was often suppressed. Continue reading

Monsoon marks 20 years — and ‘a little bit’ of growth — on Capitol Hill

(Image: Monsoon)

Brother and sister restaurateurs Sophie and Eric Banh are marking 20 years of business on 19th Ave E. Their Vietnamese Seattle classic Monsoon will have a “20 Bucks for 20 Years” menu starting this weekend featuring “a handful of dishes that were very popular in the early years” and are still popular today.

We’re going to bet that the drunken chicken made the list.

Surviving two decades on the Hill’s quieter side, Monsoon has grown — literally — along with the neighborhood’s food and drink offerings. In 2014, it doubled its capacity, incorporating a bar, and adding a rooftop patio to the restaurant. “It’s amazing how the world turns around,” Eric Banh told CHS about Monsoon’s survival and expansion. “We almost became homeless in 2007. We survived. And now we’re growing. A little bit.” Continue reading

Central District e-bike showroom Electric Lady shutting down

Alex Kostelnik is getting out of the e-bike biz

One of the more future-looking retail ventures in the area is calling it quits. Here is why Electric Lady, the Central District e-bike shop in a building part of the wave of new development at 23rd and Union, is going out of business.

“(T)he business is doing well financially, but he is not enjoying the work needed to navigate what he sees as an unreliable industry where companies start up, go under, fire staff and get bought constantly,” the Seattle Bike Blog writes aboutowner Alex Kostelnik’s decision.

But Kostelnik tells SBB he was also having trouble connecting with his customers:

“They’re first time riders, but they’re not first time riders that are stepping up to the plate to hear about the community or join the community. They’re sort of strange outsider, know-it-all lonely people who aren’t really part of our community, and I don’t know where to begin with them.”

It’s not all sour grapes. Kostelnik will continue to run 20/20 Cycles just up the E Union hill and plans to include some electric bike models in his inventory. Continue reading

Central District’s Union Market held up at gunpoint in Tuesday morning robbery

Police were searching for a suspect seen fleeing on foot through the icy slush after a Tuesday morning armed robbery at the Central District’s Union Market.

The just before 9:30 AM hold-up of the corner market involved a suspect seen pointing a handgun as he grabbed cash from the register of the corner store at 21st and Union. Continue reading

SNOWBRUARY 2019: Tuesday update — Capitol Hill’s slow melt, trees vs. wires, and, yay, more Seattle snow history

UPDATE 8:45 PM: Sorry, parents. No school again Wednesday.

Original report: The rains came but so did more snow as a month of ice and cold on Capitol Hill has continued into its second Tuesday.

The expected warmer air did arrive and brought an overnight of sleet following a bout of even more wet, heavy snow that pushed Seattle much closer to the bring of the feared “snowmageddon.” Around 20,000 were without power at points of the night with reports of trees and branches giving way to the heavy snow. Large trees were reported down throughout the Arboretum and blocking streets including 19th Ave E. A car was smashed by one fallen tree near Interlaken Park. Seattle City Light reported one of the biggest problems is actually the melting snow — large branches relieved of the melting snow suddenly spring up and strike utility wires. Continue reading

Seattle’s homelessness response is lacking — Here is some of what is broken

With reporting by SCC Insight

Last week, the Seattle City Auditor released its review of the city’s homelessness response related to early outreach, hygiene services, and evaluation. The report was critical of the city’s execution on all three.

“The City does not currently use a robust systematic approach for managing homeless outreach field operations, which involve nine nonprofit organizations, multiple City agencies, and King County,” the report reads. “Outreach providers, including the Navigation Team, need direct access to diversion resources to better serve newly unsheltered individuals, and the Human Service’s Department’s December 2018 diversion guidelines represent a significant positive step.”

The report is part of an ongoing evaluation of the city’s response to the crisis and comes as Kshama Sawant has moved to block Mayor Jenny Durkan’s nomination of Jason Johnson as Director of the Human Services Department in a battle over how the city manages its homelessness resources. It also comes as Capitol Hill’s business community awaits progress at City Hall on an agreement about how money from the neighborhood’s chamber of commerce will be spent to power a homelessness outreach effort here on Capitol Hill. Continue reading