About jseattle

Justin is publisher of CHS. You can reach him at chs@capitolhillseattle.com or call/txt (206) 399-5959. Follow @jseattle on Twitter or be best pals on Facebook.

Here’s what owner Stowell says about closing Anchovies and Olives

(Image: Anchovies and Olives)

After eight years of business, Anchovies and Olives will close to end 2017. Seattle restaurateur Ethan Stowell, one of the city’s most prolific chef/owners, says not to try to read too much into the closure. It’s not always about trends and demographics. Sometimes, it’s just time for restaurants to close.

“We’ve loved this restaurant,” Stowell said Thursday after the announcement of its planned December 31st last night of service at 15th and Pine. “You never want to close down a business. You wish everything was a home run.” Continue reading

Westman’s Bagels and Coffee bringing ‘morning culture’ to E Madison

Highly anticipated Westman’s Bagels and Coffee is nearly ready to serve up its first boiled and baked masterpieces with just the right amount of schmear — maybe even opening in time to enjoy a few of the final days of Chanukah. Sometimes big expectations get packed into small spaces on Capitol Hill.

“People are passionate about their bagels,” Monica Dimas tells CHS. “Their expectations can be based on a perfect bagel they had in New York 12 years ago.”

Dimas, a big player in making small spaces work, and baker Molly Westman hope to meet some of those expectations and bring a little NYC to E Madison when they hope to finally debut the new streetside cafe and bagel counter next week after months of anticipation. Continue reading

Starbucks making Capitol Hill ‘move’ of its Broadway/Republican cafe

Broadway and Denny’s coming soon Starbucks

The Seattle-based coffee giant is pretty much ruining the joke. There won’t be a Starbucks on every corner on Broadway.

Employees at the Broadway and Republican location are telling customers that, come 2018, the shop will be “moving” to the new 101 Broadway building, across from Capitol Hill Station at Broadway and Denny.

CHS reported this summer on plans for a new Starbucks in the new mixed-use building near the busy transit station. Now it appears Starbucks corporate has deemed the old Broadway and Republican location unnecessary.

The closure will mark the second Starbucks to shutter on Capitol Hill to end 2017. Earlier this year, the 15th Ave E Starbucks — at one time an indie-styled experiment by the company — shuttered and will make way for a new Full Tilt ice cream shop.

Starbucks, meanwhile, isn’t the only big coffee chain closing cafes on the Hill. CHS reported on the lawsuit and the tax problems behind the closure of Tully’s after 20 years at 19th and Aloha.

As for what is next at Broadway and Republican, CHS doesn’t allow itself to indulge in straight up rumors too often but the exit of Starbucks on this end of Broadway might connect to persistent gossip we hear of a big brand pizza chain looking to expand its Capitol Hill presence. Feel free to speculate further in comments.

The Broadway and Republican Starbucks is slated for its final day of business on January 8th.

 

Victrola expanding coffee roasting operations off Hill but Pike’s small-batch beans will stay

Inside Pike Victrola’s roasting room (Image: Victrola Roasters)

Capitol Hill remains fertile ground for coffee bean roasting but the area’s tight quarters will mean one player is downsizing its on-Hill operations. Victrola has announced it is moving its largest roaster to Lynnwood to focus its growing wholesale production in a new facility:

One of Seattle’s original specialty coffee roasters is getting a strong shot of focused energy and experience with the addition of Torsten Gohre as Director of Wholesale, as well as the establishment of a new production facility. Tor joined Victrola in July 2017, bringing his talents and expertise from 10 years as Western Region Sales Director for a Fortune 500 corporation, where he managed a portfolio of business across 13 states, contributing to 20% year-over-year growth for 10 consecutive years. Tor’s role at Victrola is to define and implement an optimal structure for wholesale operations and oversee all client relationships, including day-to-day service, education and new accounts. He will lead all business development and account management strategy, with a focus on expanding into new market segments such as lodging, airport, college and university, business and industry, and healthcare channels.

Victrola owner Dan Ollis tells CHS “space has become a real concern” at Victrola’s Pike roastery and cafe. “I’m sure you have seen the loading/unloading craziness,” he writes. “The Bigger Roaster will move, and the original roaster will stay in its place at 310 East Pike St.” Continue reading

Blotter | Victim reports hate crime in Broadway pepper spray assault

See something others should know about? Email CHS or call/txt (206) 399-5959. You can view recent CHS Crime coverage here.

  • Broadway pepper spray assault: A man reported a possible hate crime after a pepper spray attack last Thursday night on Capitol Hill. Police and Seattle Fire were called to CC Attle’s on E Olive Way around 8:30 PM on December 7th to a report that a man had been pepper sprayed in the face. The victim told police he believed he was attacked because he is gay:

    Police say the victim described his attacker as an unknown race male, 5’10”, with a slim build and dreadlocks. He was wearing a dark overcoat at the time of the assault. Seattle Fire responded but the victim did not need to be taken to the hospital. SPD is investigating. There were no immediate arrests reported.

  • QFC ‘crack’ assault: An employee at the Harvard Market QFC suffered an unusual assault after trying to deal with an unwanted visitor to the Pike and Broadway store last Friday. Police and Seattle fire were called to the scene just before noon to a report the employee was feeling dizzy after having what he believed to have been crack cocaine smoke blown in his face while trying to remove a trespasser from the property. SFD was called to treat the employee. We do not know what the substance was determined to be. There were no arrests.

‘Pick two of your favorites from these images’ — Take this survey to help shape the next decade of Capitol Hill development

In November, CHS reported on the process to update the Capitol Hill Design Guidelines — Rule #1: No ugly buildings, we quipped. The guidelines, which haven’t been updated since 2005, serve as a neighborhood-specific vetting framework for projects that go through the city’s broader design review process. These guidelines inform how design review boards evaluate the exterior aesthetic of proposed projects (the guidelines include metrics such as building materials and building shape).

Community groups and neighbors highly engaged in the effort have provided feedback to shape the update — but officials are also collecting preferences from respondents via this Capitol Hill Design Guidelines Update survey:

Continue reading

Design review: Pratt Fine Arts Center development in the CD, ‘upscale’ small efficiency project on Capitol Hill

A development set to create market-rate housing and reshape a key block of Central District arts and culture and a project that proves Capitol Hill microhousing is not dead will both take their debut bows in front of the East Design Review Board Wednesday night.

1900 S Jackson
The plan announced in spring to create a full-block expansion of the Pratt Fine Arts Center in conjunction with a six-story, 160-unit mixed-use will move forward Wednesday night as developer Daniels Real Estate brings its proposal up for early design guidance.

CHS reported in April on the Pratt project as the Central District cultural center that serves more than 4,000 art students a year marked its 40th anniversary by announcing the venture with Daniels Real Estate. The art center today has 19,000 square feet of studio space in its two existing buildings, which will remain open during the expansion. The expansion will grow the campus by adding 75% of the block between S Jackson and S Main and 19th and 20th Aves. Underground parking will have space for 100 cars. Continue reading

CHS Pics | Hillary Clinton draws a crowd — and cookies, capes, and cheers — on Seattle’s Capitol Hill

Bigly loser Hillary Clinton still has lots of fans on Capitol Hill. Readers carrying her new book, What Happened, lined up on a chilly Tuesday outside 10th Ave’s Elliott Bay Book Company where the politician who nearly became the nation’s first woman president made a signing appearance.

Plenty of Capitol Hill luminaries found a place in line. Some like Linda Derschang whose Little Oddfellows operates inside the bookstore, came armed with gifts like HRC cookies. Others let their Hillary Clinton super capes do the talking.

Continue reading

Seattle labor opposition continues for New Seasons plans at 23rd and Union

Pro-labor advocates opposed to the grocery chain’s planned arrival in the Central District gathered outside the office of Lake Union Partners Monday afternoon to hand over a letter asking the developer to reconsider plans for Portland-based New Seasons to anchor the East Union mixed-use project.

“As​ ​more​ ​upsetting​ ​news​ ​surfaces​ ​about​ ​New​ ​Seasons,​ ​we​ ​ask​ ​that​ ​you​ ​work​ ​with​ ​members​ ​of the​ ​Good​ ​Jobs​ ​Coalition​ ​who​ ​live​ ​in​ ​the​ ​Central​ ​District​ ​to​ ​address​ ​our​ ​concerns​ ​about​ ​New Seasons,” the letter reads.​ “​We​ ​don’t​ ​believe​ ​New​ ​Seasons​ ​is​ ​a​ ​good​ ​fit​ ​for​ ​our​ ​community,​ ​and​ ​we​ ​want​ ​to​ ​work with​ ​you​ ​to​ ​find​ ​a​ ​solution​ ​that​ ​meets​ ​the​ ​needs​ ​of​ ​long-time​ ​Central​ ​District​ ​residents.” Continue reading

CHS Pics | Punk Rock Flea Market makes Central District Red Apple temporary home

Given the coming changes at 23rd and Jackson, the shuttered Red Apple in the shopping center acquired for Vulcan redevelopment can be a symbol of pretty much anything you want — gentrification, displacement, change. But last week, it was simply a giant shuttered space full of old grocery infrastructure that needed to be cleared out. The Punk Rock Flea Market was in full scramble mode to find its 2017 one-weekend home after previous plans fell through. So those shelves — and much much more — needed to come out.

“It looked like a grocery store,” PRFM organizer Josh Okrent tells CHS. “It had all the infrastructure of a grocery store. We just started tearing it all down.” Continue reading