CHS Pics | From gray to rainbows with Capitol Hill 2018 Pride celebrations

Gray skies gave way to a sunny Broadway celebration of Pride this year. Appropriately themed Rain to Rainbows, PrideFest drew a large crowd of glitter and rainbows-adorned LGBTQ+ Seattleites and their allies to Broadway and Cal Anderson.

PrideFest Capitol Hill again turned Broadway from John to Roy into a party street. Hosted by local teen drag queen Rainbow Gore Cake, its main stage featured a variety of DJs, live performances, and special drag guests. An all-day karaoke stage drew performers across a variety of genres, drumlines and street performers wowed crowds, and the cast of Julia’s on Broadway put on a spectacular drag show. Continue reading

Trans Pride Seattle shares its stage with immigrant rights to start off 2018 Pride weekend on Capitol Hill

With reporting and photography by Alex Garland

Trans Pride, the feistiest of Seattle’s annual Pride celebrations, also proved to be the most inclusive Friday night, making space for the fight for rights for trans and gender non-conforming people and the cause of ending the separation of immigrant families at the southern border.

Graciela Nunez Pargas of the Washington State Immigrant Solidarity Network was invited by Trans Pride organizer the Gender Justice League to speak about the effort to reunify families.

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Here’s everything happening on Capitol Hill for Pride weekend 2018

You know it. #stillherestillqueer #prideseattle #capitolhillseattle

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With more street parties and the return of the neighborhood’s annual events, the gayborhood is busier than ever this Pride. Here is everything happening on Capitol Hill for Pride 2018.

With so many new parties joining Pride weekend classics at the Cuff and the Wildrose, they City of Seattle decided to produce a map for 2018 showing all the street closures: Continue reading

Doghouse’s leather and kink retail project set to kick new life into 107-year-old Pike/Pine building with a (probably) racy past

A Capitol Hill leather and kink shop is set to be at the heart of an overhaul of an overlooked but history-packed 107-year-old building on a key E Pike block.

Doghouse Leathers is starting in on design planning for a new home at 715 E Pike in the 1911-built building sandwiched by Saint John’s and Stitches and Babeland that is one of the few auto row-era structures still standing that has not yet been transformed for the new Pike/Pine.

“In my 35+ years dealing with Pike/Pine, I have never seen anything in that location other than the construction office for Pike Motorworks,” Doghouse owner Jeff Henness tells CHS. Continue reading

Pride in your work(s of art) — Capitol Hill’s Queer Art Walk tonight

Not everything made the map — check out Surreal Soirée!, free at Fred Wildlife Refuge (Image: @cybeles_spells)

With the celebration of Capitol Hill’s “only holiday” in full swing, Thursday night brings a special “Queer” edition of the neighborhood’s monthly art walk. A map of the special events, shows, and performances is below. Continue reading

Here’s why there are no Pride banners on Broadway

The 2018 Dyke March will bring plenty of rainbows to Broadway

Nobody seemed to notice when the snowflakes didn’t go up around Christmas. But a few readers have asked CHS to check in on a symbol of Pride missing from the Broadway streetscape again this year. There are no Pride banners on the street’s utility poles.

A representative for the Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce tells CHS that the nonprofit’s banner program had to be discontinued last year “due to increased costs associated with installation.” Continue reading

Here’s why this weird little Capitol Hill park is hosting a weekly summer DJ set

PlayThey: Top row (left to right): Jasper Fox, Brian is Ze, Jazz Goldman
Bottom Row: Kara Phoebe, Neve Be, Joy Ma
Not pictured: Christian Radler

A triangular park in front of one of the most unique office buildings in the world isn’t your typical venue for summer DJ dancing. THiRST, a weekly all-ages party, is putting the unassuming McGilvra Place Park along E Madison at 15th into motion every Friday through summer.

‘THiRST is a queer/femme DJ event. I started off go-go dancing in the gay scene being kind of like the ‘hot oddity,’ in the room,” Kara Phoebe says.

After working in many different entertainment industries and watching friends barred from different venues and areas for being “too intersectional,” Phoebe was inspired to start a collective of seven queer artists with the goal of being as accessible as possible. Continue reading

CHS Pics | Butts and trash make way for glitter and rainbows as month of Capitol Hill Pride events begins with clean-up

Sunday kicked off a month of Pride events on Capitol Hill with a clean-up of Cal Anderson Park and nearby sidewalks and streets. Volunteers and the Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce sported gloves and this year’s Clean Sweep “Cap Hill” shirts as they collected cigarette butts and other assorted trash from Broadway and Pike/Pine. It’s time to make room for the glitter.

June brings a steady flow of the events that have grown into traditions on Capitol Hill in recent years — and a few new ones. A full slate of Capitol Hill Pride events is below. Continue reading

With Seattle City Hall flag raising, new stripes for Pride in 2018

Celebrating six years of raising the Pride flag over Seattle’s City Hall, the Seattle LGBTQ Commission, in partnership with SEqual Seattle, and Mayor Jenny Durkan unveiled a new Pride flag Friday featuring five additional colors.

As the conversation of gender spectrum and people of color grows in prominence within the LGBTQ/queer community, the Seattle LGBT Commission aimed at representing all aspects of the community in one, increasingly inclusive flag.

The event organizers explain the inspiration behind the updated flag: Continue reading

Premiering at SIFF, The Most Dangerous Year documents frontline struggle for trans rights in Washington

Images from The Most Dangerous Year, a documentary that follows a group of Washington State families with transgender kids who joined the fight against the wave of discriminatory anti-transgender legislation

In December of 2015, Vlada Knowlton and her family were adapting to the realities of their five-year-old daughter Annabelle’s transgender identity, and after a difficult period of adjustment things were going great. Then she got a phone call. It was Aidan Key, founder of Gender Diversity, a support group for parents of trans kids that had helped the Knowlton family navigate the often-frightening process of affirming a child’s gender identity. Key had bad news. A new wave of anti-trans legislation was about to hit Washington, and he had a difficult request for Knowlton: Would she be willing to apply her skills as a filmmaker to document the coming struggle?

“I never intended to make a film about transgender people, because for me it was such a personal thing,” Knowlton says, “I’d already gone through that trauma and thought things were gonna get good in our lives again. But it became clear to me after this conversation that I had to use whatever skills I had to start fighting, not only for my own child but for all people like her.”

(Official) Trailer for “The Most Dangerous Year” from Marymoor Productions on Vimeo.

The result is a full-length documentary, The Most Dangerous Year, which chronicles the struggle of people like Knowlton and her family as they fought multiple legislative efforts to deny civil rights to trans people. The film makes its world premiere on Capitol Hill at The Egyptian Theater as part of the Seattle International Film Festival.

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